Catalogue


New Turkes : dramatizing Islam and the Ottomans in early modern England /
Matthew Dimmock.
imprint
Aldershot, Hants, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate Pub., 2005.
description
viii, 243 p.
ISBN
0754650227 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Aldershot, Hants, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate Pub., 2005.
isbn
0754650227 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
5372228
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
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This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2005
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Early Modern England was obessed with the "turke." Following the first Ottoman siege of Vienna in 1529 the printing presses brought endless prayer sheets, pamphlets and books concerning this "infidel" threat before the public in the vernacular for the first time. As this body of knowledge increased, stimulated by a potent combination of domestic politics, further Ottoman incursions and trade, English notions of Islam and of the "turke" became nuanced in a way that begins to question the rigid assumptions of traditional critical enquiry. This book traces the shifting notion of the "turke" in English culture throughout the sixteenth century, revealing the central and revealing place this figure came to occupy in English cultural life. That the "new turkes" of the title were not Ottoman Muslims, but English Protestants, further serves as a timely riposte to the decisive rhetoric of contemporary conflicts.
Unpaid Annotation
New Turkes explores the ways in which print culture helped define and promulgate a European construction of "Turkishness" that was nebulous and ever shifting. By placing in context the developing encounters between the Ottoman and Christian worlds, it shows how ongoing engagements reflected the nature of the "Turke" in sixteenth century English literature. By offering readings of texts by artists, poets and playwrights-especially canonical figures like Spencer, Kyd, Marlowe and Shakespeare-a bewildering variety of approaches to Islam and the "turke" is revealed fundamentally questioning any dominant, defining narrative of "otherness." In so doing this book demonstrates how continuing English encounters, both real and fictional, with Muslims complicated the notion of the "Turke."
Main Description
Following the first Ottoman siege of Vienna in 1529, the printing presses brought endless prayer sheets, pamphlets and books concerning the 'infidel' threat of the 'Turke' before the English public in the vernacular for the first time. This volume traces the shifting notion of the 'Turke' in English culture throughout the sixteenth century, revealing the central place this figure came to occupy.
Bowker Data Service Summary
'New Turkes' traces the shifting notion of the 'turke' in English culture throughout the 16th century, from the Ottoman siege of Vienna to the 'new turkes' of English Protestantism, revealing the central place the figure of the 'turke' came to have in English cultural life.
Long Description
Early Modern England was obsessed with the 'turke'. Following the first Ottoman siege of Vienna in 1529 the printing presses brought endless prayer sheets, pamphlets and books concerning this 'infidel' threat before the public in the vernacular for the first time. As this body of knowledge increased, stimulated by a potent combination of domestic politics, further Ottoman incursions and trade, English notions of Islam and of the 'turke' became nuanced in a way that begins to question the rigid assumptions of traditional critical enquiry.New Turkes: Dramatizing Islam and the Ottomans in Early Modern England explores the ways in which print culture helped define and promulgate a European construction of 'Turkishness' that was nebulous and ever shifting. By placing in context the developing encounters between the Ottoman and Christian worlds, it shows how ongoing engagements reflected the nature of the 'Turke' in sixteenth century English literature. By offering readings of texts by artists, poets and playwrights - especially canonical figures like Kyd, Marlowe and Shakespeare - a bewildering variety of approaches to Islam and the 'turke' is revealed fundamentally questioning any dominant, defining narrative of 'otherness'.In so doing, this book demonstrates how continuing English encounters, both real and fictional, with Muslims complicated the notion of the 'Turke'. It also shows how the Anglo-Ottoman relationship - which was at its peak in the mid-1590s - was viewed with suspicion by Catholic Europe, particularly the apparent ritual and devotional similarities between England's reformed church and Islam. That the 'new turkes' were not Ottoman Muslims, but English Protestants, serves as a timely riposte to the decisive rhetoric of contemporary conflicts and modern scholarly assumption.
Table of Contents
The 'Turke' and 'Turkishness' in England, 1529-1571p. 20
Receiving 'great affection' from 'the Turke' : Anglo-Ottoman relations and the stagep. 87
George Peele and English perspectives on 'Alcazar'p. 112
'Mighty hath God and Mahomet made thy hand' : Tamburlaine and Islamp. 135
'The troublers of all Christendome' : dramatizing the Ottomans in the 1590sp. 162
Conclusion : 'all of our nation that knowe Turkie' : the Ottomans and English culturep. 198
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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