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Reluctant pioneers : China's expansion northward, 1644-1937 /
James Reardon-Anderson.
imprint
Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, 2005.
description
xvii, 288 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0804751676 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, 2005.
isbn
0804751676 (alk. paper)
contents note
The manorial experiment (1644-1740) -- From manor to market (1740-1850) -- The advance of the Qing (1850-1911) -- Sojourners -- Networks -- Refugees -- Commerce and trade (1644-1903) -- A tale of two cities : Newchwang and Dairen (1903-22) -- Agriculture : innovation and development?.
catalogue key
5370813
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [269]-281) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Reluctant Pioneers describes the migration of Chinese to Manchuria, their settlement there, and the incorporation of Manchuria into an expanding China, from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries. The expansion of Chinese state and society from the agrarian and urban core of China proper to the territories north and west of the Great Wall doubled the size of the empire, forming the "China" now so prominent on the map of Asia. The movement and settlement of people, clearing and cultivation of land, invasions of soldiers, circulation of merchants, and establishment of government offices extended the boundaries of China at the same time that the American expansion westward and the Russian expansion eastward created the other great landed empires that dominated the twentieth century and persist today. The chief purpose of this book is to describe the Chinese experience and what it tells us about the expansion of states and societies, drawing comparisons with Russia and America, and reflecting on the nature of what scholars since Frederick Jackson Turner have called "frontiers" and what Turner's critics now call "borderlands" or "middle ground." In addition, the book touches on several other issues central to our understanding of modern China, such as the development of the Chinese economy and the nature of Chinese migration.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-09-01:
Unlike the US or Russia, China's historical development in recent centuries has not conventionally been associated with frontier expansionism. Reardon-Anderson (Georgetown Univ.) rectifies that oversight in this clearly organized, exceptionally well written study of Manchuria's agrarian development over the course of three centuries. The region's transformation from being a Manchu dynastic, territorial reservation to an area culturally dominated and extensively settled by waves of Han Chinese cultivators is both analyzed and broadly compared to the the US and Russian historical processes of pioneering. Reardon-Anderson divides his discussion into three phases dealing successively with Manchuria's land, people, and economy. The Qing Dynasty's initially restrictive land policy notably failed to preserve Manchuria from the inroads of commoditization and Chinese migrants, and in fact was abandoned by late-19th-century officials anxious to thwart foreign imperialism. Manchuria's Han settlers proved themselves "reluctant pioneers," however, since they habitually saw colonization as a dire economic necessity rather than a field of opportunity. The author provocatively argues that, in essentially replicating the economic organization and technology of their north Chinese origins, the Chinese settlers opted for "growth without change" in Manchuria down to the era of total Japanese hegemony in the 1930s. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduate through professional collections. R. P. Gardella United States Merchant Marine Academy
Reviews
Review Quotes
"James Reardon-Anderson makes a valuable contribution to the burgeoning literature on the frontiers of China."The China Quarterly
"James Reardon-Anderson makes a valuable contribution to the burgeoning literature on the frontiers of China."-- The China Quarterly
"James Reardon-Anderson makes a valuable contribution to the burgeoning literature on the frontiers of China."--The China Quarterly
"This ambitious and elegant book covers a subject of vast scope."China Review International
"This ambitious and elegant book covers a subject of vast scope."-- China Review International
"This ambitious and elegant book covers a subject of vast scope."--China Review International
"Unlike the US or Russia, China's historical development in recent centuries has not conventionally been associated with frontier expansionism. Reardon-Anderson . . . rectifies that oversight in this clearly organized exceptionally well written study of Manchuria's agrarian development over the course of three centuries."CHOICE
"Unlike the US or Russia, China's historical development in recent centuries has not conventionally been associated with frontier expansionism. Reardon-Anderson . . . rectifies that oversight in this clearly organized exceptionally well written study of Manchuria's agrarian development over the course of three centuries." CHOICE
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2005
Choice, September 2005
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
"Unlike the US or Russia, China's historical development in recent centuries has not conventionally been associated with frontier expansionism. Reardon-Anderson . . . rectifies that oversight in this clearly organized exceptionally well written study of Manchuria's agrarian development over the course of three centuries."CHOICE "James Reardon-Anderson makes a valuable contribution to the burgeoning literature on the frontiers of China."The China Quarterly
Back Cover Copy
"Unlike the US or Russia, China's historical development in recent centuries has not conventionally been associated with frontier expansionism. Reardon-Anderson . . . rectifies that oversight in this clearly organized exceptionally well written study of Manchuria's agrarian development over the course of three centuries."CHOICE "James Reardon-Anderson makes a valuable contribution to the burgeoning literature on the frontiers of China."--The China Quarterly
Main Description
Reluctant Pioneersdescribes the migration of Chinese to Manchuria, their settlement there, and the incorporation of Manchuria into an expanding China, from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries. The expansion of Chinese state and society from the agrarian and urban core of China proper to the territories north and west of the Great Wall doubled the size of the empire, forming the "China" now so prominent on the map of Asia. The movement and settlement of people, clearing and cultivation of land, invasions of soldiers, circulation of merchants, and establishment of government offices extended the boundaries of China at the same time that the American expansion westward and the Russian expansion eastward created the other great landed empires that dominated the twentieth century and persist today. The chief purpose of this book is to describe the Chinese experience and what it tells us about the expansion of states and societies, drawing comparisons with Russia and America, and reflecting on the nature of what scholars since Frederick Jackson Turner have called "frontiers" and what Turner's critics now call "borderlands" or "middle ground." In addition, the book touches on several other issues central to our understanding of modern China, such as the development of the Chinese economy and the nature of Chinese migration.
Table of Contents
The manorial experiment (1644-1740)p. 18
From manor to market (1740-1850)p. 46
The advance of the Qing (1850-1911)p. 71
Sojournersp. 102
Networksp. 127
Refugeesp. 147
Commerce and trade (1644-1903)p. 171
A tale of two cities : Newchwang and Dairen (1903-22)p. 204
Agriculture : innovation and development?p. 218
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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