Catalogue


The underground reporters /
Kathy Kacer.
imprint
Toronto : Second Story Press, 2004.
description
xi, 155 p. : ill., maps, ports. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1896764851 (pbk.) :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Toronto : Second Story Press, 2004.
isbn
1896764851 (pbk.) :
catalogue key
5366402
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Reviews
Review Quotes
It joins the many valuable contributions to the body of literature for children on this topic. The Underground Reporters can also be an inspiration for children about how the human spirit can triumph over adversity. Highly recommended.
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews,
Booklist, February 2005
Voice of Youth Advocates, April 2005
School Library Journal, August 2005
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In Budejovice, a quiet village in the Czech Republic, during the Second World War, a plot of land by the river was allocated to the Jewish youth of the village. There, some brave young people decided to create a newspaper. This book chronicles the lives of the young people who were the newspaper's creators and contributors.
Description for Reader
In Budejovice, a quiet village in the Czech republic, laws and rules were introduced to restrict the freedom of Jewish people during the dark days of World War II. In a small shack on the small plot of land allocated to the village's Jewish youth, some brave young people decided to create a newspaper to show that despite the new dangers in their lives, they were still creative, energetic and adventurous. Though most of the village's Jews did not survive the war, copies of the newspaper did. The Underground Reporters chronicles how these youth held out hope for a peaceful world to come.
Main Description
A group of young Jewish friends create a newspaper during WWII to keep their spirits and hopes alive.
Main Description
In Budejovice, a quiet village in the Czech republic, laws and rules were introduced to restrict the freedom of Jewish people during the dark days of World War II. In a small shack on the small plot of land allocated to the village's Jewish youth, some brave young people decided to create a newspaper to show that despite the new dangers in their lives, they were still creative, energetic and adventurous. Though most of the village's Jews did not survive the war, copies of the newspaper did. The Underground Reporterschronicles how these youth held out hope for a peaceful world to come.
Unpaid Annotation
In a Czech village during World War II, Jewish youth created a newspaper to show that despite the new dangers in their lives they were still creative. Though most of the village's Jews did not survive the war, copies of the newspaper did. The Underground Reporters chronicles how these brave young people held out hope for a peaceful world to come.
Unpaid Annotation
IN BUDEJOVICE, a quiet village in the Czech Republic, laws and rules were introduced to restrict the freedom of Jewish people during the dark days of World War II. A small plot of land by the river was allocated to the village's Jewish youth. There they could go to swim and play games, while other parts of the village were off limits to them. On this land was a small shack that became the community center--a place to escape from persecution and discrimination. And it was there that some brave young people decided to create a newspaper, a magazine that would prove to themselves and their community that they were still creative, energetic, and adventurous. The magazine, "Klepy," was born on August 30, 1940, and over the next two years, twenty-two issues were created and circulated. The magazine included simple type-written stories, elaborate paintings, and editorials, all created in the midst of war. John Freund was one of the young "reporters" who contributed to the magazine. In April 1942, John and the other one thousand Jews of Budejovice were deported to the concentration camp Terezin. Most of these deportees were immediately sent on to Auschwitz and to their deaths. John was among a handful of Budejovice Jews who survived the war. He currently lives in Toronto. Remarkably, copies of "Klepy" also survived. "The Underground Reporters chronicles the lives of the young people who contributed to the newspaper. The story is full of adventure, mystery and excitement. With drawings, poems, stories and jokes, "The Underground Reporters looks at life with as much optimism as possible, providing hope for a peaceful world to come.

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