Catalogue


Conservatism and southern intellectuals, 1789-1861 : liberty, tradition, and the good society /
Adam L. Tate.
imprint
Columbia : University of Missouri Press, c2005.
description
ix, 402 p.
ISBN
082621567X (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Columbia : University of Missouri Press, c2005.
isbn
082621567X (alk. paper)
contents note
The old Republicans : John Taylor of Caroline and John Randolph of Roanoke -- Separating state and society : the political principles of the old Republicans -- John Taylor, John Randolph, and the good society -- Antebellum proslavery intellectuals : Nathaniel Beverley Tucker and William Gilmore Simms -- The political principles of Tucker and Simms -- Imagining the conservative slave society : the social thought of Tucker and Simms -- Whig humorists : Joseph Glover Baldwin and Johnson Jones Hooper -- The Whig political thought of Baldwin and Hooper -- The Whig social thought of Baldwin and Hooper.
catalogue key
5363155
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Adam L. Tate is Assistant Professor of History at Clayton College and State University in Morrow, Georgia.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Tate possesses a wonderful writing style, impeccable research skills, and a rigorous analytical mind. This excellent book should establish him as a serious and important historian."-- Douglas Ambrose
An exhaustively researched and carefully written account of the varieties of antebellum Southern conservatism." -- Paul Gottfried
"Tate possesses a wonderful writing style, impeccable research skills, and a rigorous analytical mind. This excellent book should establish him as a serious and important historian."
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2005
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Summaries
Short Annotation
In Conservatism and Southern Intellectuals, 1789-1861, Adam L. Tate discusses the nature of southern conservative thought between 1789 and 1861 by examining six conservatives whose lives and careers spanned the antebellum period: John Randolph of Roanoke, John Taylor of Caroline, Nathaniel Beverly Tucker, William Gilmore Simms, Joseph Glover Baldwin, and Johnson Jones Hooper.
Unpaid Annotation
Adam L. Tate discusses the nature of southern conservative thought between 1789 and 1861 by examining six conservatives whose lives and careers spanned the antebellum period: John Randolph of Roanoke, John Taylor of Caroline, Nathaniel Beverly Tucker, William Gilmore Simms, Joseph Glover Baldwin, and Johnson Jones Hooper.
Main Description
InConservatism and Southern Intellectuals, 17891861,Adam L. Tate discusses the nature of southern conservative thought between 1789 and 1861 by examining six conservatives whose lives and careers spanned the antebellum period: John Randolph of Roanoke, John Taylor of Caroline, Nathaniel Beverly Tucker, William Gilmore Simms, Joseph Glover Baldwin, and Johnson Jones Hooper. Tate contends that southern conservatism derived its distinctive characteristics from its acceptance of aspects of John Locke's political theory as it was articulated during the American Revolution. Locke argued that the state and society were two entities that could be reformed and manipulated by men. Showing that most southern conservative intellectuals accepted Locke's premise regarding separation of state and society, Tate examines both the political views and social vision of the six conservatives surveyed. He pays special attention to how these conservatives dealt with states' rights, republicanism, slavery, sectionalism, and religion, as well as western expansion and migration. Tate maintains that while southern conservatives forged a common political tradition based on Old Republican interpretations of the Constitution, they did not create a unified tradition of social thought. Even though most of them desired a cohesive southern intellectual movement, as well as a homogenous southern culture, their disagreements over the good society prevented them from creating a common southern social vision to accompany their states' rights political tradition.
Main Description
In Conservatism and Southern Intellectuals, 1789–1861,Adam L. Tate discusses the nature of southern conservative thought between 1789 and 1861 by examining six conservatives whose lives and careers spanned the antebellum period: John Randolph of Roanoke, John Taylor of Caroline, Nathaniel Beverly Tucker, William Gilmore Simms, Joseph Glover Baldwin, and Johnson Jones Hooper. Tate contends that southern conservatism derived its distinctive characteristics from its acceptance of aspects of John Locke’s political theory as it was articulated during the American Revolution. Locke argued that the state and society were two entities that could be reformed and manipulated by men. Showing that most southern conservative intellectuals accepted Locke’s premise regarding separation of state and society, Tate examines both the political views and social vision of the six conservatives surveyed. He pays special attention to how these conservatives dealt with states’ rights, republicanism, slavery, sectionalism, and religion, as well as western expansion and migration. Tate maintains that while southern conservatives forged a common political tradition based on Old Republican interpretations of the Constitution, they did not create a unified tradition of social thought. Even though most of them desired a cohesive southern intellectual movement, as well as a homogenous southern culture, their disagreements over the good society prevented them from creating a common southern social vision to accompany their states’ rights political tradition.
Main Description
In Conservatism and Southern Intellectuals, 17891861,Adam L. Tate discusses the nature of southern conservative thought between 1789 and 1861 by examining six conservatives whose lives and careers spanned the antebellum period: John Randolph of Roanoke, John Taylor of Caroline, Nathaniel Beverly Tucker, William Gilmore Simms, Joseph Glover Baldwin, and Johnson Jones Hooper. Tate contends that southern conservatism derived its distinctive characteristics from its acceptance of aspects of John Locke's political theory as it was articulated during the American Revolution. Locke argued that the state and society were two entities that could be reformed and manipulated by men. Showing that most southern conservative intellectuals accepted Locke's premise regarding separation of state and society, Tate examines both the political views and social vision of the six conservatives surveyed. He pays special attention to how these conservatives dealt with states' rights, republicanism, slavery, sectionalism, and religion, as well as western expansion and migration. Tate maintains that while southern conservatives forged a common political tradition based on Old Republican interpretations of the Constitution, they did not create a unified tradition of social thought. Even though most of them desired a cohesive southern intellectual movement, as well as a homogenous southern culture, their disagreements over the good society prevented them from creating a common southern social vision to accompany their states' rights political tradition.
Long Description
In Conservatism and Southern Intellectuals, 1789-1861, Adam L. Tate discusses the nature of southern conservative thought between 1789 and 1861 by examining six conservatives whose lives and careers spanned the antebellum period: John Randolph of Roanoke, John Taylor of Caroline, Nathaniel Beverly Tucker, William Gilmore Simms, Joseph Glover Baldwin, and Johnson Jones Hooper. Tate contends that southern conservatism derived its distinctive characteristics from its acceptance of John Locke's political theory as it was articulated during the American Revolution. Locke argued that the state and society were two entities that could be reformed and manipulated by men. Showing that most southern conservative intellectuals accepted Locke's premise regarding separation of state and society, Tate examines both the political views and social vision of the six conservatives surveyed. He pays special attention to how these conservatives dealt with states' rights, republicanism, slavery, sectionalism, and religion, as well as western expansion and migration. Tate maintains that while southern conservatives forged a common political tradition based on Old Republican interpretations of the Constitution, they did not create a unified tradition of social thought. Even though most of them desired a cohesive southern intellectual movement, as well as a homogenous southern culture, their disagreements over the good society prevented them from creating a common southern social vision to accompany their states' rights political tradition.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. IX
Introduction: Understanding Southern Conservatismp. 1
The Old Republicans: John Taylor of Caroline and John Randolph of Roanokep. 8
Separating State and Society: The Political Principles of the Old Republicansp. 30
John Taylor, John Randolph, and the Good Societyp. 77
Antebellum Proslavery Intellectuals: Nathaniel Beverley Tucker and William Gilmore Simmsp. 136
The Political Principles of Tucker and Simmsp. 152
Imagining the Conservative Slave Society: The Social Thought of Tucker and Simmsp. 189
Whig Humorists: Joseph Glover Baldwin and Johnson Jones Hooperp. 246
The Whig Political Thought of Baldwin and Hooperp. 270
The Whig Social Thought of Baldwin and Hooperp. 307
Conclusionp. 355
Appendixp. 357
Works Citedp. 373
Indexp. 397
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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