Catalogue

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Chronology of public health in the United States /
Russell O. Wright.
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2005.
description
viii, 176 p.
ISBN
0786421940 (softcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2005.
isbn
0786421940 (softcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Disease causes of death versus actual causes, 2000 -- Ten leading causes of death, 1900-1940 -- Ten leading causes of death, 1950-2000 -- Ten leading causes of death, 1900-2000 -- Death rates per 100,000 for selected causes, 1900-2000 -- Discovery of disease organisms -- 1918 influenza and pneumonia deaths -- Drugs most frequently prescribed, 2001 -- Fatal occupational injuries, 2002 -- AIDS deaths and new cases, 1985-2002.
abstract
"This chronology tracks the development of public health in the United States. The work also includes extensive information on the immune system, along with data on death rates and life expectancies that provide the best measure of the success of public health in the United States"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
5363036
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Statistical analyst Russell O. Wright is the author of McFarland chronologies on communication (2004), transportation (2004), energy (2003), labor (2003), and stock market (2002), as well as several McFarland baseball books
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-09-01:
Wright (an independent scholar) has compiled many chronologies and statistical analyses. This new chronology tracks development in England and the US regarding community-based immunizations, vaccinations, and lifestyle issues. The extensive introduction describes some of the theories concerning disease prevention and the body's immune system, although not all sources agree with his B- and T-cell primer. The annual Statistical Record of Health & Medicine (CH, Jun'95, 32-5437), though offering deeper and broader coverage, costs significantly more than the slim Chronology. Although public health began millennia ago, major knowledge has increased since the late 18th century, when interest in sanitation and microorganisms became more widespread and public health developed as a field of medicine. This book is concerned with events taking place since 1796, mainly since 1900. In addition to infectious diseases, Wright discusses autoimmune and other factors that contribute to the health of US citizens. He includes various appendixes concerning causes of death, death rates, and other health information. Although this work cannot stand alone as a resource, it is a good beginning point for community health research; it should be considered for purchase, with some reservations. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Lower- and upper-level undergraduates; two-year technical/community college students. J. Q. Vance Walla Walla Community College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
SciTech Book News, June 2005
Choice, September 2005
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Aside from other humans, the strongest challengers to human beings are microscopic life forms and viruses. Public health specialists provide preventive measures by immunizing the masses and educating the public about health practices and lifestyle choices most likely to prevent disease and chronic illness. This chronology tracks the development of public health in the United States. It begins in 1796 with the vaccination for smallpox by Dr. Edward Jenner in England, soon adapted as the first public health initiative in America. It follows the course of public health through the development of the germ theory of disease and the subsequent focus on vaccines and antibiotics; the advent of penicillin in the 1940s and the Salk vaccine against polio in the early 1950s; and the gradual shift of public health efforts from combatting infectious diseases to understanding the diseases of aging. The work also includes extensive information on the immune system, along with data on death rates and life expectancies that provide the best measure of the success of public health in the United States.
Main Description
Aside from other humans, the strongest challengers to human beings are microscopic life forms and viruses. Public health specialists provide preventive measures by immunizing the masses and educating the public about health practices and lifestyle choices most likely to prevent disease and chronic illness.This chronology tracks the development of public health in the United States. It begins in 1796 with the vaccination for smallpox by Dr. Edward Jenner in England, soon adapted as the first public health initiative in America. It follows the course of public health through the development of the germ theory of disease and the subsequent focus on vaccines and antibiotics; the advent of penicillin in the 1940s and the Salk vaccine against polio in the early 1950s; and the gradual shift of public health efforts from combatting infectious diseases to understanding the diseases of aging. The work also includes extensive information on the immune system, along with data on death rates and life expectancies that provide the best measure of the success of public health in the United States.

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