Catalogue


Psychological reflections on cinematic terror : Jungian archetypes in horror films /
James F. Iaccino.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 1994.
description
xi, 217 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0275944913 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 1994.
isbn
0275944913 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
536018
 
Filmography: p. [195]-202.
Includes bibliographical references (p. [203]-207) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1994-11:
Iaccino probes the underlying collective images of the horror film genre by placing the narratives on a Jungian couch for psychoanalysis. His objective is to delve into the mind of the viewer to understand the desire to watch horror films. His manner is straightforward, uncluttered, and clear in introducing dominant archetypes such as the cursed wanderer (e.g., vampires and werewolves) or the shadow trickster. His interpretations and applications of Jungian perspectives into classic and contemporary horror movies are presented with able scholarship and accessible communication. He eschews the psychoanalytic jargon that encumbers some texts and offers intelligent and lucid reflections. Iaccino does an admirable job of explaining the basic concepts of Jungian archetypes and correlating them to specific and relevant plots. Though the work incorporates the theories of Jung and Carol Pearson, it is not conversant with other significant film literature (e.g., Noel Carroll's The Philosophy of Horror, 1990). But its objective is to focus on Jungian archetypes in horror films, and it accomplishes that task solidly. Recommended as a worthy introduction into the shadowy realm and meanings of the horror film. Academic libraries, all levels. T. Lindvall; Regent University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'¬úRecommended as a worthy introduction into the shadowy realm and meanings of the horror film.'¬Ě' Choice
"Recommended as a worthy introduction into the shadowy realm and meanings of the horror film."- Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 1994
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
In this examination of the psychology of terror, Iaccino uses Jungian archetypes to analyze significant works in the horror film genre. In the past, Jungian archetypes have been used to interpret mythologies, to examine great works of literature, and to explain why sexual stereotypes persist in our society. Here, for the first time, Iaccino applies such models as the "Cursed Wanderers," the "Warrior Amazons," the "Random Destroyers," and the "Techno-Myths" to highlight recurrent themes in a wide range of films, from early classics such as Nosferatu to the contemporary Nightmare on Elm Street and Alien series. With this innovative approach, Iaccino gains a new perspective on the psychology of the often powerful compulsion to be scared.
Long Description
In this examination of the psychology of terror, Iaccino uses Jungian archetypes to analyze significant works in the horror film genre. In the past, Jungian archetypes have been used to interpret mythologies, to examine great works of literature, and to explain why sexual stereotypes persist in our society. Here, for the first time, Iaccino applies such models as the Cursed Wanderers, the Warrior Amazons, the Random Destroyers, and the Techno-Myths to highlight recurrent themes in a wide range of films, from early classics such as Nosferatu to the contemporary Nightmare on Elm Street and Alien series. With this innovative approach, Iaccino gains a new perspective on the psychology of the often powerful compulsion to be scared.
Table of Contents
Preface
Introduction to the Horror Archetypes
Description of the Major Archetypes in the Horror Genre
An Historical Perspective on the Horror Archetypes
The Orphan Archetype in Horror From Psycho to The Shining: Victims of Cruel Surroundings
The Cursed Wanderer Archetype in Horror
Vampires: The Lonely Children of the Night
Werewolves: The Lonely Children of the Night
The Mad Magician
Archetype in Horror Frankenstein: The Alchemic "New Age" Creator
The Shadow Abomination
Archetype in Horror From Them to The Blob: Technologically
Produced Behemoths
The Changing Female
Archetype in Horror From Halloween to Aliens: Outdated Martyr to New Age Warrior
Avenging versus Random Destroyer
Archetypes in Horror
The Living Dead
Trilogy and Other Tales: Horrific Parables of Destruction More Contemporary
Archetypes in Horror From Dr. Phibes to Nightmare on Elm Street: The Dark
Humor Shadow-Tricksters From Re-animator to Lifeforce: The Techno-Mythic Archetypes
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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