Catalogue


The Indian mutiny and the British imagination /
Gautam Chakravarty.
imprint
Cambridge, U.K. ; New York : Cambridge University Press, c2005.
description
xi, 242 p.
ISBN
0521832748
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, U.K. ; New York : Cambridge University Press, c2005.
isbn
0521832748
catalogue key
5359471
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'... the book will have an appeal beyond literary scholars among historians and social anthropologists.' The Times Higher Education Supplement
"meticulously researched and elegantly argued" Victorian Studies Shuchi Kapila, Grinnell College
"Chakravarty's impressive study considers the ways in which the Mutiny was imagined and re-imagined by the British, viewing the insurrection not only as a refusal to accept Anglicism and forced assimilation but also as an outright rejection of European modernity...Chakravarty presents an outstanding study of the myth-making surrounding the Mutiny across ninety tense years" - English Studies in Canada Grace Moore, The University of Melbourne
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Gautam Chakravarty explores representations of the Indian Mutiny of 1857 in British popular fiction and historiography and the wider context of British involvement in India. Drawing on a wide range of primary sources including diaries, autobiographies and state papers, Chakravarty shows how narratives of the rebellion were inflected by the concerns of colonial policy and by the demands of imperial self-image. The book has a broad interdisciplinary appeal and will be of interest to scholars of English literature, British imperial history, modern Indian history and cultural studies.
Main Description
Gautam Chakravarty explores representations of the Indian Mutiny of 1857 in British popular fiction and historiography and within the wider context of British involvement in India. Drawing on diaries, autobiographies and state papers, Chakravarty demonstrates how narratives of the rebellion were inflected by the concerns of colonial policy and the demands of imperial self-image. The book has a broad interdisciplinary appeal.
Description for Bookstore
Chakravarty explores representations of the Indian Mutiny of 1857 in British popular fiction and historiography. He draws on a range of primary sources including diaries, autobiographies and state papers. The book has a broad interdisciplinary base and will appeal to scholars of English literature, modern Indian history and cultural studies.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
Glossary
Introduction
From chronicle to history
Reform and revision
Romances of empire, Romantic orientalism and Anglo-India: contexts, historical and literary
The 'Mutiny' novel and the historical archive
Counter-insurgency and heroism
Imagining resistance
Epilogue
Notes
Bibliography
Index list
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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