Catalogue

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White Mughals : love and betrayal in eighteenth-century India /
William Dalrymple.
imprint
London : HarperPerennial, 2004, c2002.
description
xlix, 580, 10 p. : ill. (some col.)
ISBN
0006550967
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London : HarperPerennial, 2004, c2002.
isbn
0006550967
catalogue key
5359218
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Kiriyama Prize, USA, 2004 : Nominated
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Destined to become an instant classic' Amanda Foreman 'William Dalrymple is that rarity, a scholar of history who can really write. This is a brilliant and compulsively readable book' Salman Rushdie 'My favourite English book of the year, [an] irresistible masterpiece' Philip Mansel, Spectator Books of the Year 'A remarkable achievement: illuminating, thought-provoking, moving and entertaining' Tablet 'A bravura display of scholarship, writing and insight. Dalrymple manages the incredible feat of outpointing most historians and most novelists in one go. This is quite simply a stunning achievement' Independent on Sunday 'Gorgeous, spellbinding and important, [a] tapestry of magnificent set-pieces' Miranda Seymour, Sunday Times 'Enthralling…brilliant, as exhaustively researched as it is brilliantly written' Mail on Sunday
'William Dalrymple is that rarity, a scholar of history who can really write. This is a brilliant and compulsively readable book' Salman Rushdie 'Destined to become an instant classic' Amanda Foreman 'A bravura display of scholarship, writing and insight. Dalrymple manages the incredible feat of outpointing most historians and most novelists in one go. This is quite simply a stunning achievement' Independent on Sunday 'Gorgeous, spellbinding and important, [a] tapestry of magnificent set-pieces' Miranda Seymour, Sunday Times 'Enthralling … brilliant, as exhaustively researched as it is brilliantly written' Mail on Sunday
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
From the early 16th century to the eve of the Indian Mutiny, the 'white Mughals' who wore local dress and adopted Indian ways were a source of embarrassment to successive colonial administrations. This book uncovers a world unexplored by history, and places at its centre a tale of betrayal.
Long Description
'Dalrymple's India is as vivid as Naipaul's' Simon Jenkins, The Times White Mughals is the romantic and ultimately tragic tale of a passionate love affair that transcended all the cultural, religious and political boundaries of its time. James Achilles Kirkpatrick was the British Resident at the court of Hyderabad when he met Khair un-Nissa 'Most Excellent among Women' the great niece of the Prime Minister of Hyderabad. He fell in love with her and overcame many obstacles to marry her, converting to Islam and according to Indian sources becoming a double-agent working against the East India Company. It is a remarkable story, involving secret assignations, court intrigue, harem politics, religious and family disputes. But such things were not unknown; from the early sixteenth century, when the Inquisition banned the Portuguese in Goa from wearing the dhoti, to the eve of the Indian Mutiny, the 'white Mughals' who wore local dress and adopted Indian ways were a source of embarrassment to successive colonial administrations. William Dalrymple unearths such colourful figures as 'Hindoo Stuart', who travelled with his own team of Brahmins to maintain his templeful of idols; and Sir David Auchterlony, who took all thirteen of his Indian wives out for evening promenades, each on the back of their own elephant. In White Mughals, William Dalrymple discovers a world almost entirely unexplored by history, and places at its centre a compelling tale of seduction and betrayal. The product of five years' writing and research, triumphantly confirms Dalrymple's reputation as one of the finest writers at work today.
Long Description
The true story of a tragic and passionate love affair--and a testament to the Indian conquest of the British imagination. Conjuring all the sweep of a great nineteenthcentury novel, acclaimed author William Dalrymple unearths the fascinating story of the British Resident at the court of the Nizam of Hyderabad, James Kirkpatrick, who in 1798 fell in love with the great-niece of the Hyderabadi prime minister. To marry her, Kirkpatrick converted to Islam and even became a double agent working against the East India Company. Shedding light on the many eccentric Westerners during this period who "turned Turk," adopting Indian customs, dress, and religions, Darymple brings to life a compelling and largely unwritten story of Britain's rule over India.
Long Description
'White Mughals' is the romantic and ultimately tragic tale of a passionate love affair that transcended all the cultural, religious and political boundaries of its time. James Achilles Kirkpatrick was the British Resident at the court of Hyderabad when he met Khair un-Nissa 'Most Excellent among Women' the great-niece of the Prime Minister of Hyderabad. He fell in love with her and overcame many obstacles to marry her, converting to Islam and, according to Indian sources, becoming a double-agent working against the East India Company. It is a remarkable story, but such things were not unknown: from the early sixteenth century to the eve of the Indian Mutiny, the 'white Mughals' who wore local dress and adopted Indian ways were a source of embarrassment to successive colonial administrations. Dalrymple unearths such colourful figures as 'Hindoo Stuart', who travelled with his own team of Brahmins to maintain his temple of idols, and Sir David Auchterlony, who took all 13 of his Indian wives out for evening promenades, each on the back of her own elephant. In 'White Mughals', William Dalrymple discovers a world almost entirely unexplored by history, and places at its centre a compelling tale of seduction and betrayal.
Main Description
This compelling history of Britain's rule over India relates the true story of James Kirkpatrick, who converted to Islam and spied on the East India Company in the midst of an affair with the great-niece of the region's prime minister. Photos.

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