Catalogue


Alexandria goes to war : beyond Robert E. Lee /
George G. Kundahl.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Knoxville : University of Tennessee Press, c2004.
description
xii, 387 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1572333200 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Knoxville : University of Tennessee Press, c2004.
isbn
1572333200 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
5356433
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [361]-376) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
George G. Kundahl served as executive director of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and as a principal deputy assistant secretary at the Department of Defense.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2005
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Summaries
Short Annotation
On the eve of the Civil War, Alexandria, Virginia, was a bustling city with a rich cultural heritage and a booming economy. Alexandrians staunchly supported staying in the Union, and yet once Virginia voted to secede, the community sent its men off to fight for the Confederacy. Alexandria Goes to War chronicles the lives of men and women whose service made the city unique in the exceptional quality and variety of talent it provided to the Confederate cause.
Unpaid Annotation
On the eve of the Civil War, Alexandria, Virginia, was a bustling city with a rich cultural heritage and a booming economy. Alexandrians staunchly supported staying in the Union, and yet once Virginia voted to secede, the community sent its men off to fight for the Confederacy. This shift in political allegiance was not dissimilar to changes occurring across the Upper South. What made Alexandria significant was that a community of 12,600 residents provided leadership and excellence disproportionate to its numbers. Alexandria Goes to War chronicles the lives of men and women whose service made the city unique in the exceptional quality and variety of talent it provided to the Confederate cause. Some of these sixteen individuals are familiar to Civil War readers as their contributions to the Southern war effort brought them special notoriety: General Lee, of course, and his son Custis; Samuel Cooper, the senior general in the Confederate army; and Commodore French Forrest. For others less well known-attorneys George Brent and Douglas Forrest, engineer Wilson Presstman, politician Daniel Funsten, student Randolph Fairfax, and immigrant Patrick O'Gorman-the Civil War provided an opportunity to exercise their full talents. Alexandrians Orton Williams and Frank Stringfellow became celebrated for their colorful adventures. Montgomery Corse's life paralleled major developments in mid-nineteenth-century America. Alexander Hunter went on to become a noted author of Civil War remembrances. Kundahl also examines the fate of Anne Frobel, a Southern sympathizer who spent the entire war behind Union lines. The survey concludes by reflecting on the role of Edgar Warfield, who well represents those forlorn survivors of the Lost Cause. Taken as a whole, these profiles constitute a microcosm of the South's desperate gamble to secede from the Union and form its own nation. The accounts of their service represent not only a single community's contribution to the redefining contest in American life but also highlight the diverse endeavors that constituted the Southern war effort.
Unpaid Annotation
On the eve of the Civil War, Alexandria, Virginia, was a bustling city with a rich cultural heritage and a booming economy. Alexandrians staunchly supported staying in the Union, and yet once Virginia voted to secede, the community sent its men off to fight for the Confederacy. This shift in political allegiance was not dissimilar to changes occurring across the Upper South. What made Alexandria significant was that a community of 12,600 residents provided leadership and excellence disproportionate to its numbers. Alexandria Goes to War chronicles the lives of men and women whose service made the city unique in the exceptional quality and variety of talent it provided to the Confederate cause. Some of these sixteen individuals are familiar to Civil War readers as their contributions to the Southern war effort brought them special notoriety: General Lee, of course, and his son Custis; Samuel Cooper, the senior general in the Confederate army; and Commodore French Forrest. For others less well known--attorneys George Brent and Douglas Forrest, engineer Wilson Presstman, politician Daniet Funsten, student Randolph Fairfax, and immigrant Patrick O'Gorman--the Civil War provided an opportunity to exercise their full talents. Alexandrians Orton Williams and Frank Stringfellow became celebrated for their colorful adventures. Montgomery Corse's life paralleled major developments in mid-nineteenth-century America. Alexander Hunter went on to become a noted author of Civil War remembrances. Kundahl also examines the fate of Anne Frobel, a Southern sympathizer who spent the entire war behind Union lines. The survey concludes by reflecting on the role of Edgar Warfield, who well represents thoseforlorn survivors of the Lost Cause. Taken as a whole, these profiles constitute a microcosm of the South's desperate gamble to secede from the Union and form its own nation. The accounts of their service represent not only a
Main Description
On the eve of the Civil War, Alexandria, Virginia, was a bustling city with a rich cultural heritage and a booming economy. Alexandrians staunchly supported staying in the Union, and yet once Virginia voted to secede, the community sent its men off to fight for the Confederacy. This shift in political allegiance was not dissimilar to changes occurring across the Upper South. What made Alexandria significant was that a community of 12,600 residents provided leadership and excellence disproportionate to its numbers. Alexandria Goes to War chronicles the lives of men and women whose service made the city unique in the exceptional quality and variety of talent it provided to the Confederate cause. Some of these sixteen individuals are familiar to Civil War readers as their contributions to the southern war effort brought them special notoriety: General Lee, of course, and his son Custis; Samuel Cooper, the senior general in the Confederate army; and Commodore French Forrest. For others less well known-attorneys George Brent and Douglas Forrest, engineer Wilson Presstman, politician Daniel Funsten, student Randolph Fairfax, and immigrant Patrick O'Gorman-the Civil War provided an opportunity to exercise their full talents. Alexandrians Orton Williams and Frank Stringfellow became celebrated for their colorful adventures. Montgomery Corse's life paralleled major developments in mid-nineteenth-century America. Alexander Hunter went on to become a noted author of Civil War remembrances. Kundahl also examines the fate of Anne Frobel, a Southern sympathizer who spent the entire war behind Union lines. The survey concludes by reflecting on the role of Edgar Warfield, who well represents those forlorn survivors of the Lost Cause. Taken as a whole, these profiles constitute a microcosm of the South's desperate gamble to secede from the Union and form its own nation. The accounts of their service represent not only a single community's contribution to the redefining contest in American life but also highlight the diverse endeavors that constituted the southern war effort. Their stories reflect the sacrifices made throughout the region for a cause that became hopeless. George G. Kundahl served as executive director of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and as a principal deputy assistant secretary at the Department of Defense. After thirty-four years of commissioned service in the U.S. Army, he is now major general, US Army Retired. A graduate of Davidson College, he received an M.A. and Ph.D. in political science from the University of Alabama. Kundahl is the author of Confederate Engineer: Training and Campaigning with John Morris Wampler. He and his wife divide time between their home in Alexandria and the French Riviera.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Key Events in the Formative Years of Alexandriap. xiii
Introductionp. 1
General in Chief: Robert E. Leep. 19
Senior General: Samuel Cooperp. 31
Field Commander: Montgomery Corsep. 51
Presidential Aide: G. W. Custis Leep. 77
General Staff Officer: George Brentp. 101
Politician: David Funstenp. 127
Naval Officers: French and Douglas Forrestp. 143
Spy: Orton Williamsp. 167
Scout: Frank Stringfellowp. 181
Engineer: Wilson Presstmanp. 197
Flower of the South: Randolph Fairfaxp. 207
Immigrant: Patrick O'Gormanp. 227
Southern Sympathizer: Anne Frobelp. 241
Chronicler: Alexander Hunterp. 259
Veteran: Edgar Warfieldp. 279
Conclusionp. 299
Other Notable Charactersp. 303
Notesp. 311
Bibliographyp. 361
Indexp. 377
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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