Catalogue


African Americans and the Gettysburg campaign /
James M. Paradis.
imprint
Lanham, Md. : Scarecrow Press, c2005.
description
xiv, 110 p.
ISBN
0810850303 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lanham, Md. : Scarecrow Press, c2005.
isbn
0810850303 (pbk. : alk. paper)
contents note
Before the storm -- African Americans in the Civil War -- The great rebel invasion -- In the wake of the storm -- Carrying the struggle on to victory -- Little note nor long remember.
catalogue key
5356415
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
James M. Paradis is a former licensed battlefield guide at Gettysburg National Military Park
Reviews
Review Quotes
From the Foreword: The significance of Gettysburg to all people, with an emphasis on Black America, is masterfully addressed by historian James M. Paradis in African Americans and the Gettysburg Campaign. The story of the borough and county's Black community caught up in an epic struggle makes for narrative history at its best. The book is people- and site-oriented. As such it encourages the ever increasing number of park and area visitors that delight in heritage tourism to view sites associatedwith Gettysburg's African American community. To facilitate the visitor's desire to walk in the steps of history, the author has included a chapter highlighting Black-associated sites ad structures, along with two very useful tour maps...
Paradis, a former licensed battlefield guide at Gettysburg National Military Park and former lecturer and participant in Civil War round tables, addresses the many ways black Americans participated in the Gettysburg campaign, their influence on the military outcome, and the impact of the Civil War on their lives. He examines the active prewar role of Gettysburg citizens, both black and white, by describing characters from the black community in Gettysburg, including farmers, blacksmiths, teachers, veterinarians, preachers, servants, and laborers. Maps, photographs, and illustrations appear throughout. Two appendixes are included: black residents and points of interest in the town of Gettysburg, and a modern tour of Gettysburg and African Americans.
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2005
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Summaries
Long Description
The role that African Americans played in the Gettysburg Campaign has now been largely forgotten. This work seeks to rectify this oversight by bringing to light the many ways that Black Americans took part in the crucial battle at Gettysburg, how they were able to influence the military outcome, and the impact the Civil War had on their lives. Author, James M. Paradis, a former licensed battlefield guide at Gettysburg National Military Park, examines the active prewar role played by Gettysburg citizens, both black and white, in dramatic rescues of the Underground Railroad. Readers are introduced to an impressive ensemble of characters from the black community in Gettysburg including farmers, blacksmiths, teachers, veterinarians, preachers, servants, and laborers. He also dispels the myth that no black men fought or were killed defending Gettysburg from the Confederate invasion. By filling in the missing pieces, this book will help African Americans take back their own history in this dramatic struggle for freedom. African Americans and the Gettysburg Campaign will appeal to scholars and general readers alike. Civil War buffs and potential Gettysburg visitors will find the tour for today and points of interest sections valuable tools for enhancing their experience of this sacred ground. Maps, photographs, and illustrations appear throughout.
Table of Contents
List of Maps and Illustrationsp. vii
Forewordp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introductionp. xiii
African Americans at Gettysburg before the Warp. 1
African Americans and the Civil Warp. 15
The Great Rebel Invasionp. 29
In the Wake of the Stormp. 55
Carrying the Struggle on to Victoryp. 65
Little Note nor Long Rememberp. 75
Black Residents and Points of Interest in the Town of Gettysburgp. 83
Gettysburg and African Americans: A Tour for Todayp. 87
Bibliographyp. 93
Indexp. 103
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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