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Toussaint's clause : the founding fathers and the Haitian revolution /
Gordon S. Brown.
imprint
Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c2005.
description
xi, 321 p. : map.
ISBN
1578067111 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c2005.
isbn
1578067111 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
July 1790 -- St. Domingue -- White cockade, red cockade -- The cost of neutrality -- Trouble with Britain -- Trouble with France -- Toussaint's clause -- Creating a quarantine -- The St. Domingo station -- Jefferson equivocates -- The Leclerc expedition -- St. Domingo and Louisiana -- A risky trade -- The clearance act debate -- The trade suspended -- Embargo and neglect -- Epilogue.
general note
"An ADST-DACOR diplomats and diplomacy book."
catalogue key
5352972
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-12-01:
Brown, a retired ambassador, presents an outstanding analysis of the impact of the Haitian revolution on US foreign relations in the early republic. In 1790, Haiti represented the second largest market for US traders, making it crucial to US prosperity. Although they disagreed on many issues, Federalists and Republicans agreed on the need to protect the US from the third great revolution of the 18th century. Brown shows how US policy evolved from assistance to Toussaint L'Ouverture, the former slave who became governor-general and de facto lord of Haiti, to overt hostility to independent Haiti. Not surprisingly, the global crisis over the French Revolution and the Napoleonic wars, domestic disputes between Federalists and Republicans, regional differences over slavery, and the egalitarianism of the Haitian revolt all complicated the relationship. Thomas Jefferson, in order to placate France and consolidate control in the South, reversed US policy and placed the island in an embargo in which it languished for nearly half a century, in many ways resembling current US policy toward Cuba. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. General readers through professionals and practitioners. W. M. Weis Illinois Wesleyan University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2005
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Summaries
Main Description
In its formative years, America, birthplace of a revolution, wrestled with a volatile dilemma. John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, and many other founding fathers clashed. What was to be the new republic's strategy toward a revolution roiling just off its shores? From 1790 to 1810, the disagreement reverberated far beyond Caribbean waters and American coastal ports. War between France and Britain, the great powers of the time, raged on the seas and in Europe. America watched aghast as its trading partner Haiti, a rich hothouse of sugar plantations and French colonial profit, exploded in a rebellion led by former slave Toussaint L'Ouverture. Toussaint's Clause: The Founding Fathers and the Haitian Revolutionnarrates the intricate history of one of America's early foreign policy balancing acts and one of the nation's defining moments. The supporters of Toussaint's rebellion against France at first engineered a bold policy of intervention in favor of the rebels. But Southern slaveholders, such as Jefferson, eyed the slave-general's rise and masterful leadership skills with extreme alarm and eventually obtained a reversal of the policy-even while taking advantage of the rebellion to make the fateful Louisiana purchase. Far from petty, the internal squabbles among America's founders resolved themselves in delicate maneuvers in foreign capitals and on the island. The stakes were mortally high-a misstep could have plunged the new, weak, and neutral republic into the great powers' global war. In Toussaint's Clause, former diplomat and ambassador Gordon S. Brown details the founding fathers' crisis over Haiti and their rancorous struggle, which very often cut to the core of what America meant by revolution and liberty. During a thirty-five-year Foreign Service career, Gordon S. Brown served mainly in the Middle East and North Africa including assignments as General Norman Schwarzkopf's political advisor in the first Gulf War and ambassador to Mauritania. Since his retirement, he has written Coalition, Coercion, and Compromiseon the diplomacy of the first Gulf War and The Norman Conquest of Southern Italy and Sicily.
Main Description
In its formative years, America, birthplace of a revolution, wrestled with a volatile dilemma. John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, and many other founding fathers clashed. What was to be the new republic's strategy toward a revolution roiling just off its shores?From 1790 to 1810, the disagreement reverberated far beyond Caribbean waters and American coastal ports. War between France and Britain, the great powers of the time, raged on the seas and in Europe. America watched aghast as its trading partner Haiti, a rich hothouse of sugar plantations and French colonial profit, exploded in a rebellion led by former slave Toussaint L'Ouverture.Toussaint's Clause: The Founding Fathers and the Haitian Revolutionnarrates the intricate history of one of America's early foreign policy balancing acts and one of the nation's defining moments. The supporters of Toussaint's rebellion against France at first engineered a bold policy of intervention in favor of the rebels. But Southern slaveholders, such as Jefferson, eyed the slave-general's rise and masterful leadership skills with extreme alarm and eventually obtained a reversal of the policy-even while taking advantage of the rebellion to make the fateful Louisiana purchase.Far from petty, the internal squabbles among America's founders resolved themselves in delicate maneuvers in foreign capitals and on the island. The stakes were mortally high-a misstep could have plunged the new, weak, and neutral republic into the great powers' global war. In Toussaint's Clause, former diplomat and ambassador Gordon S. Brown details the founding fathers' crisis over Haiti and their rancorous struggle, which very often cut to the core of what America meant by revolution and liberty.During a thirty-five-year Foreign Service career, Gordon S. Brown served mainly in the Middle East and North Africa including assignments as General Norman Schwarzkopf's political advisor in the first Gulf War and ambassador to Mauritania. Since his retirement, he has writtenCoalition, Coercion, and Compromiseon the diplomacy of the first Gulf War andThe Norman Conquest of Southern Italy and Sicily.
Main Description
The story of an early American foreign policy crisis and its lasting effect on liberty and the Caribbean

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