Catalogue


The fountainheads : Wright, Rand, the FBI and Hollywood /
Donald Leslie Johnson.
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., 2005.
description
xii, 231 p.
ISBN
078641958X (illustrated case binding : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., 2005.
isbn
078641958X (illustrated case binding : alk. paper)
contents note
Wright -- Rand -- Wright and Rand -- Filmland, Wright and Rand -- Fountainheads.
catalogue key
5348661
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Donald Leslie Johnson grew up in Washington State and now lives in Kangarilla, Australia
Summaries
Main Description
Speculation abounds about the relationship between Frank Lloyd Wright and Ayn Rand. Was Wright the inspiration for Howard Roark, the architect hero of Rand's The Fountainhead? What can be made of their collaboration on the book's failed 1944 movie adaptation, and what can be gleaned from the 1949 Hollywood production of The Fountainhead? Where does the FBI--Wright was dubbed a communist sympathizer, and Rand was called before the House Un-American Activities Committee--fit into the story?Art, architecture, philosophy, film and politics come together in this exploration, which relies on the writings of Wright and Rand, FBI files, visual evidence and more to cement their connection. Chapters are devoted to Wright and Rand, the two together, their parts in both the failed production of The Fountainhead and the successful one, and the effect FBI harassment had on the movie and on their lives. Subsequent chapters discuss Wright's place as a Hollywood architect, and offer telling set designs and architectural images from the 1949 production of The Fountainhead. Several appendices supplement the illustrated text, and there is a filmography of movies mentioned in the book. A bibliography and index are also included.
Main Description
Speculation abounds about the relationship between Frank Lloyd Wright and Ayn Rand. Was Wright the inspiration for the architect hero of Rand's The Fountainhead? What can be made of their collaboration on the book's failed 1944 movie adaptation, or gleaned from the 1949 Hollywood production? Wright was dubbed a communist sympathizer, and Rand was a friendly witness for the House Un-American Activities Committee; what effect did FBI harassment have on the movie and their lives?
Main Description
Speculation abounds about the relationship between Frank Lloyd Wright and Ayn Rand. Was Wright the inspiration for Howard Roark, the architect hero of Rand's The Fountainhead? What can be made of their collaboration on the book's failed 1944 movie adaptation, and what can be gleaned from the 1949 Hollywood production of The Fountainhead? Where does the FBI--Wright was dubbed a communist sympathizer, and Rand was called before the House Un-American Activities Committee--fit into the story? Art, architecture, philosophy, film and politics come together in this exploration, which relies on the writings of Wright and Rand, FBI files, visual evidence and more to cement their connection. Chapters are devoted to Wright and Rand, the two together, their parts in both the failed production of The Fountainhead and the successful one, and the effect FBI harassment had on the movie and on their lives. Subsequent chapters discuss Wright's place as a Hollywood architect, and offer telling set designs and architectural images from the 1949 production of The Fountainhead. Several appendices supplement the illustrated text, and there is a filmography of movies mentioned in the book. A bibliography and index are also included.
Table of Contents
Wright
Frank Lloyd Wrightp. 5
Spring Green, Chicago, Tokyo, Los Angelesp. 7
Southwest architecturep. 12
Spring Green, Scottsdale, Moscow, London and beyondp. 20
Rand
Ayn Randp. 31
St. Petersburg, Petrograd, Leningrad, Chicagop. 32
Hollywoodp. 36
Wright and Rand
New York Cityp. 43
Roark and Wrightp. 54
Rand's Neutra housep. 60
Wright's Rand housep. 66
Filmland, Wright and Rand
Preproduction 1944p. 73
Redding, New York City, Hollywoodp. 76
Washington, D.C., Hollywood, paranoia and HUACp. 82
The movie revivedp. 100
Hollywood clientsp. 110
Hollywood friendsp. 121
The fountainhead's visual imagesp. 132
Hollywood clients, the 1950sp. 159
Fountainheads
Conclusionsp. 173
Frank Capra's bleeding-heart liberalsp. 185
Mrs. Walsh's extractsp. 187
Red charge, Marin County, 1957p. 188
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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