Catalogue


Consuming splendor : society and culture in seventeenth-century England /
Linda Levy Peck.
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2005.
description
xvi, 431 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
ISBN
0521842328 (hbk.), 9780521842327
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2005.
isbn
0521842328 (hbk.)
9780521842327
catalogue key
5344599
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 360-404) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Linda Levy Peck is Columbian Professor of History at the George Washington University.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-11-01:
Peck (George Washington Univ.) is a distinguished scholar of early modern English political culture whose previous works concerning patronage, corruption, and court politics (e.g., Court Patronage and Corruption in Early Stuart England, CH, Jul'91, 28-6400) have been well received by scholars. This work, however, promises to outdo them all. It not only has a catchy title, it also makes powerful arguments that will refashion understanding of the early modern period and the rise of the modern state. The book is divided into nine chapters that consider early modern shipping, technology transfer, consumer demand, conspicuous architectural consumption and collecting, and the relationship of luxury consumption to war and society. Amid many illustrations, there is much fascinating detail and a welcome absence of flights into theoretical fancy on a fashionable subject. This volume redates the genesis of a luxury-oriented economy and treats the British civil wars as part of a continuous trend toward a consumption-oriented society that historians have previously associated with late-17th-century and 18th-century developments. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. M. C. Noonkester William Carey College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Peck is a distinguished scholar of early modern English political culture whose previous works concerning patronage, corruption and court politics... have been well received by scholars. This work, however, promises to outdo them all. It not only has a catchy title, it also makes powerful arguments that will refashion understanding of the early modern period and the rise of the modern state." -Choice
Peck is a distinguished scholar of early modern English political culture whose previous works concerning patronage, corruption and court politics... have been well received by scholars. This work, however, promises to outdo them all. It not only has a catchy title, it also makes powerful arguments that will refashion understanding of the early modern period and the rise of the modern state.” --Choice
Peck is a distinguished scholar of early modern English political culture whose previous works concerning patronage, corruption and court politics'¦ have been well received by scholars. This work, however, promises to outdo them all. It not only has a catchy title, it also makes powerful arguments that will refashion understanding of the early modern period and the rise of the modern state.” -Choice
'...Peck's admirable command of the primary evidence allows the reader to gain an intimate sense of the experience of being an aristocratic consumer residing in a London that was opening up to the riches of the world. This is a wonderful in which to dip for a plethora of insights into the growth of demand of luxuries and the attempts to both stimulate and to satisfy it.' Times Literary Supplement
"...Peck's book offers a comprehensive, highly readable, and informative study of what seventeenth-century England desired, bought, and collected." -Rachel Ramsey, Assumption College
"[Peck's] investigations carry her through a most impressive bibliography of references, brimming over with the most apposite quotations from contemporaries, and stiffened by multitudinous pieces of recent research...her emphasis on the wonders and the variety of the luxuries that burgeoned in the seventeenth century produce a thoroughly convincing argument....Peck's book is a magnificent survey of a luxury-ridden seventeenth century." -The Economic History Review
'Linda Levy Peck's Consuming Splendor lucidly and accessibly traces a variety of new economic practices and new patterns of manufacture and consumption through the English seventeenth century. She provides a wealth of previously unexamined materials - the architecture of shopping in Jacobean London, for example, or the ways in which consumers were trained in their new wants - and analyzes some of the ways England became first a great consumer of luxury goods and, later, a great producer of them. Pertinently illustrated, often with previously undiscussed examples, the book will interest literary scholars and cultural critics as much as historians and any reader attracted by a cultural watershed in early modern England.' A. R. Braunmuller, University of California, Los Angeles
.,."she sustains her major thesis convincingly. Her work and other recent studies have broadened the period within which modern consumption patterns can be seen to have emerged and have shown the centrality of elite culture in creating modernity in all its forms... an important contribution...." -Journal of Interdisciplinary History
"...she sustains her major thesis convincingly. Her work and other recent studies have broadened the period within which modern consumption patterns can be seen to have emerged and have shown the centrality of elite culture in creating modernity in all its forms... an important contribution...." -Journal of Interdisciplinary History
'There is no doubt that Linda Levy Peck has produced a major new work on the society and the economy of late sixteenth century England. She has offered new thoughts on the constitutions of luxury and its uses. peck has pushed the accepted advent of the division of retail shopping from wholesale and manufacturers forward by about one hundred years. At the same time she has caused a rethink on the effect of the English Civil wars and the Interregnum on trade and consumption of luxury. Consuming Splendor is well footnoted and has an extensive bibliography to and index. It would make a worthy addition to any interested party's bookshelf and at 320 (hardback) its a steal.' Open History
'This is a book which is at once highly readable and crammed with fascinating detail and which offers a fresh and valuable new perspective on the seventeenth century. These are virtues that usually get in the way of one another; but here we are enthralled and instructed in equal measure.' John Morrill, University of Cambridge
"This is a splendid survey of a complex issue and should inspire further interdisciplinary studies to extend the reassessment of economic politics further back into the sixteenth century." --Rebecca S. More, Brown University: Renaissance Quarterly Review
"This sumptuous book posits nothing less than a reappraisal of the standard narrative of the history of seventeenth-century England... effectively puts paid to the notion that it was the eighteenth century that invented modern consumer culture. Rather, that culture was fostered a century earlier by the much-maligned Stuart court." -The Historian
'Professor Peck's excellent book casts new light on the consumption of luxury goods during the latter part of the sixteenth century and the whole of the seventeenth century; what might be called a long seventeenth century ... There is no doubt that Linda Levy Peck has produced a major new work on the society and the economy of the late sixteenth and seventeenth century England. She has offered new thoughts on the constituents of luxury and its uses. Peck has pushed the accepted advent of the division of retail shopping from wholesale and manufacturers forward by about one hundred years. At the same time she has caused a rethink on the effect of the English Civil Wars and the Interregnum on trade and the consumption of luxury. Consuming Splendor is well footnoted and has a extensive bibliography and index. It would make a worthy addition to any interested party's bookshelf and at £20 (hardback) is a steal.' Open History: The Journal of the Open University History Society
"ÝPeck's¨ investigations carry her through a most impressive bibliography of references, brimming over with the most apposite quotations from contemporaries, and stiffened by multitudinous pieces of recent research...her emphasis on the wonders and the variety of the luxuries that burgeoned in the seventeenth century produce a thoroughly convincing argument....Peck's book is a magnificent survey of a luxury-ridden seventeenth century." -The Economic History Review
"This sumptuous book will doubtless become a classic treatment of seventeenth-century elite consumer culture in England, a volume beautifully illustrated and, in contrast to its topic, moderately priced. The author's extensive knowledge of Jacobean and Stuart courts and the careers of powerful personages, like Thomas Howard, Earl of Arundel, provide a unique context, with scenes richly figured by courtiers, virtuosi, and kings' favourites, their tastes shaped by Italy and France. The extensive illustrations are integral to many of the thematic sectors of the book...Linda Levy Peck addresses shopping, the cultivation of new tastes, the built environment --importantly, considering luxury expenditures on churches-- and explores the exceptional influence of the continent on English exiles, visitors, and their correspondents." -Canadian Journal of History
"Linda Levy Peck's much-anticipated study of the place of luxury, especially luxury goods, in seventeenth-century England is itself a beautifully produced publication from Cambridge University Press.... This book is an important study of the material world in seventeenth-century England and will be required reading for anyone contemplating the topics that Peck addresses here. Moreover, her work has properly placed yet another crucial development in the course of early modern England's rise to global power in the appropriate context'the early seventeenth century, prior to and during the Civil War and Interregnum." - Journal of British Studies, Sabrina Alcorn Baron, University of Maryland
'... handsomely produced and richly illustrated book ... The reader emerges full of admiration for the unusual and enlightening information it contains ... commendably wide-ranging research ... It would be churlish to ask for more.' The English Historical Review
"Beautifully illustrated and full of fascinating detail, Consuming Splendor makes important claims that should give rise to wide debate." - Journal of Social History, Pauline Croft, Royal Holloway University of London
'Consuming Splendor is an appropriately luxurious volume ... Professor Peck knows her subject. ... Clearly an academic suited to her field of study. From the perspective of history, she comforts the addicted ...' Times Online
"Consuming Splendor is an appropriately luxurious volume." -The Times, T2 Supplement
'Consuming Splendor is itself a lavish product of CUP, generous in size, with quality illustrations, but at the same time reasonably priced. ... Linda Levy Peck provides an accessible account of luxury shopping, collecting and patronage among the rich of Jacobean, Stuart and Civil War England, and mainly London. ... This book is itself a splendid collection, a juxtaposition of well-known accounts of courtly collecting and virtuosi projects together with detailed investigation of occasional episodes such as Lional Cranfield's London building projects or John Cheynes' commissioning of a funeral monument from the Bernini workshops for his wife, Lady Jane. ... Consuming Splendor brings together examples of collecting and displaying art, luxury goods, and scientific objects, which before have only been studied separately.' History Today
'Based on persuasive evidence from such diverse aspects of seventeenth-century English society and culture as government policy, travel, building, shopping, gardening, and collecting, Consuming Splendor shows convincingly that luxury consumption transformed the economy, material culture, and aesthetic standards well before the 'long' eighteenth century in which scholars have previously located a consumer revolution. Consuming Splendor also provides a new dimension to women's history and gender studies by showing that women as well as men enthusiastically embraced new roles as shoppers, consumers, and connoisseurs. Finally, it contributes to the ongoing revision of Stuart history by demonstrating that these developments continued uninterrupted during the upheavals of the Civil War.' Barbara Harris, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
'... an encyclopaedic survey of the origins of the shopping mall and consumer revolution in 17th-century London.' Sunday Herald
'Based on persuasive evidence from such diverse aspects of seventeenth-century English society and culture as government policy, travel, building, shopping, gardening, and collecting, Consuming Splendor shows convincingly that luxury consumption transformed the economy, material culture, and aesthetic standards well before the "long" eighteenth century in which scholars have previously located a consumer revolution. Consuming Splendor also provides a new dimension to women's history and gender studies by showing that women as well as men enthusiastically embraced new roles as shoppers, consumers, and connoisseurs. Finally, it contributes to the ongoing revision of Stuart history by demonstrating that these developments continued uninterrupted during the upheavals of the Civil War.' Barbara Harris, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 2006
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Tracing the ways in which 17th-century consumption of luxury goods changed social practices, gender roles, royal policies and the economy, this book considers the development of new ways of shopping; new aspirations and identity shaped by print, continental travel and foreign trade; and new building, furnishing and collecting.
Description for Bookstore
A fascinating study of the ways in which consumption transformed social practices, gender roles, royal policies, and the economy in seventeenth-century England. It reveals for the first time the emergence of consumer society in seventeenth-century England.
Description for Bookstore
A fascinating study of the ways in which consumption transformed social practices, gender roles, royal policies, and the economy in seventeenth-century England. It reveals for the first time the seventeenth-century origins of consumer society and offers an entirely new framework for the history of seventeenth-century England.
Long Description
A fascinating study of the ways in which the consumption of luxury goods transformed social practices, gender roles, royal policies, and the economy in seventeenth-century England. Linda Levy Peck charts the development of new ways of shopping; new aspirations and identities shaped by print, continental travel, and trade to Asia, Africa, the East and West Indies; new building, furnishing, and collecting; and the new relationship of technology, luxury and science. As contemporaries eagerly appropriated and copied foreign material culture, the expansion of luxury consumption continued across the usual divide of the Civil War and the Interregnum and helped to propel England from the margins to the center of European growth and innovation. Her findings show for the first time the seventeenth-century origins of consumer society and she offers the reader an entirely new framework for the history of seventeenth-century England.
Table of Contents
List of illustrationsp. viii
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
List of abbreviationsp. xvi
Introductionp. 1
"I must have a damasked pair of spurs": shopping in seventeenth-century Londonp. 25
"We may as well be silke-masters as sheepe-masters": transferring technology in seventeenth-century Englandp. 73
"What do you lack? What is't you buy?" Creating new wantsp. 112
"Anything that is strange": from rarities to luxury goodsp. 152
"Examine but my humours in buildings, gardening, and private expenses": cultural exchange and the new built environmentp. 188
"The pictures I desire to have...must be exquisitely done and by the best masters": luxury and war, 1640-1660p. 230
"Rome's artists in this nature can do no more": a Bernini in Chelseap. 277
"The largest, best built, and richest city in the world": the Royal Society, luxury manufactures, and aristocratic identityp. 311
New wants, new wares: luxury consumption, cultural change, and economic transformationp. 346
Bibliographyp. 360
Indexp. 405
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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