Catalogue


Minerva's aviary : philosophy at Toronto, 1843-2003 /
John G. Slater.
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c2005.
description
xv, 623 p., [24] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0802038700 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c2005.
isbn
0802038700 :
local note
Fisher PRC copy: With dust jacket.
Fisher Walsh copy: Author's presentation copy addressed to Michael Walsh, with dust jacket.
catalogue key
5342448
 
Gift; Adam Crabtree; 2014.
Gift; Michael Walsh; 2013; RB312737.
Includes bibliographical references (p. [597]-606) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2007
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Reader
Philosophy has been taught at the University of Toronto, and its predecessor King's College, since 1843. While much has changed in that time, the university's Department of Philosophy remains one of Canada's preeminent institutions for philosophical instruction. In Minerva's Aviary, John G. Slater documents the history of Toronto's Philosophy Department from its founding to contemporary times.In the early years, the teaching of philosophy at the university was an appendage to courses in religion. As time passed however, the discipline grew into the independent, largely secular subject it is today. The story of how this happened is told in terms of the people who taught in the department. Slater also recounts the histories and sometimes difficult integration of the philosophy departments that came with the smaller institutions that federated with the university around the turn of the twentieth century: Victoria University, St. Michael's College, and Trinity College.Comprehensive and lovingly written, Minerva's Aviaryis the result of decades of research by one of the department's most esteemed recent scholars. Slater's intense investigations have uncovered a complex and evolving past that shatters some established myths but also roughly mirrors what was happening in universities throughout the English-speaking world. It thus adds greatly to our understanding of the intellectual history of the last two centuries.
Main Description
Philosophy has been taught at the University of Toronto, and its predecessor King's College, since 1843. While much has changed in that time, the university's Department of Philosophy remains one of Canada's preeminent institutions for philosophical instruction. In Minerva's Aviary , John G. Slater documents the history of Toronto's Philosophy Department from its founding to contemporary times. In the early years, the teaching of philosophy at the university was an appendage to courses in religion. As time passed however, the discipline grew into the independent, largely secular subject it is today. The story of how this happened is told in terms of the people who taught in the department. Slater also recounts the histories and sometimes difficult integration of the philosophy departments that came with the smaller institutions that federated with the university around the turn of the twentieth century: Victoria University, St. Michael's College, and Trinity College. Comprehensive and lovingly written, Minerva's Aviary is the result of decades of research by one of the department's most esteemed recent scholars. Slater's intense investigations have uncovered a complex and evolving past that shatters some established myths but also roughly mirrors what was happening in universities throughout the English-speaking world. It thus adds greatly to our understanding of the intellectual history of the last two centuries.
Description for Reader
Philosophy has been taught at the University of Toronto, and its predecessor KingA's College, since 1843. While much has changed in that time, the universityA's Department of Philosophy remains one of CanadaA's preeminent institutions for philosophical instruction. In MinervaA's Aviary, John G. Slater documents the history of TorontoA's Philosophy Department from its founding to contemporary times.In the early years, the teaching of philosophy at the university was an appendage to courses in religion. As time passed however, the discipline grew into the independent, largely secular subject it is today. The story of how this happened is told in terms of the people who taught in the department. Slater also recounts the histories and sometimes difficult integration of the philosophy departments that came with the smaller institutions that federated with the university around the turn of the twentieth century: Victoria University, St. MichaelA's College, and Trinity College.Comprehensive and lovingly written, MinervaA's Aviaryis the result of decades of research by one of the departmentA's most esteemed recent scholars. SlaterA's intense investigations have uncovered a complex and evolving past that shatters some established myths but also roughly mirrors what was happening in universities throughout the English-speaking world. It thus adds greatly to our understanding of the intellectual history of the last two centuries.
Table of Contents
The rise and fall of King's Collegep. 3
The founding professor : James Beavenp. 35
Teacher extraordinary : George Paxton Youngp. 95
The battle over Young's successorp. 138
The emergence of psychologyp. 168
'A weakened echo of Dr. Young' : James Gibson Humep. 210
Gentleman and scholar : George Sidney Brettp. 237
Graduate study in philosophyp. 278
The last autocrat : Fulton Henry Andersonp. 304
The first chairman : Thomas Anderson Goudgep. 365
The merging of the streamsp. 416
A united departmentp. 445
Philosophy at Victoria Collegep. 475
Philosophy at Trinity Collegep. 511
Philosophy at St. Michael's Collegep. 531
Some reflections on this historyp. 581
Departmental heads, chairmen, and chairsp. 585
Faculty in philosophy (1843-2005)p. 587
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem