Catalogue


Chinese medicine in early communist China, 1945-1963 : a medicine of revolution /
Kim Taylor.
imprint
Abingdon, Oxon ; New York, NY : RoutledgeCurzon, 2005.
description
xi, 236 p. : ill.
ISBN
041534512X (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Abingdon, Oxon ; New York, NY : RoutledgeCurzon, 2005.
isbn
041534512X (hardback)
catalogue key
5335846
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Kim Taylor's book,Chinese Medicine in Early Communist China, is a gratifying addition to the list of genuinely new historical studies.'- China Quarterly 'Taylor has written a significant work thath makes real contributions to our understanding of changing pedagogic and therapeutic practices in Chinese medicine.'- China Journal 'The first coherent analysis of non-"Western" medicine in the People's Republic ... a welcome contribution to a timely topic, of high academic standard and succinctly written in accessible language.'- Asian Affairs What Taylor offers is a dense descriptive investigation illuminating the dimensions of political rhetoric within the processes of the development and canonization of medical knowledge in the early years of the People's Republic of China. - Angelika C. Messner
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Summaries
Main Description
Chinese Medicine in Early Communist Chinadescribes the transformation of Chinese medicine from a marginal, side-lined medical practice of the mid-twentieth century, to an essential and high-profile part of the national health-care system under the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). The analysis begins with the start of the Civil war 1945-49, when the CCP was entrenched in rural Yan'an and began to enlist practitioners of Chinese medicine into the communist revolution. Taylor explains that Chinese medicine achieved the scale of promotion it did precisely because it fitted in, sometimes in an almost accidental fashion, with the ideals of the Communist Revolution. In deconstructing the events of this period, this study succeeds in clarifying the circumstances in which a number of key issues in the recent history of Chinese medicine, previously regarded as proof of Mao Zedong's unerring support of Chinese medicine, took place. These include the formation of the term 'Traditional Chinese Medicine' (or'TCM'), the exact circumstances of Mao Zedong's declaration that 'Chinese medicine is a great treasure-house!' and the unlikely beginnings of the formation of a 'Basic Theory of TCM'. By 1963 the foundation for the institutionalized and standardized format of modern Chinese medicine found in China and abroad today had been laid.
Back Cover Copy
Using original sources, this significant text looks at the transformation of Chinese medicine from a marginal, side-lined medical practice of the early twentieth century, to an essential and high-profile part of the national health-care system under the Chinese Communist Party. The political, economic and social motives which drove this promotion are analyzed and the extraordinary role that Chinese medicine was meant to play in Mao Zedong's revolution is fully explored for the first time, making a major contribution to the history of Chinese medicine.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Kim Taylor looks at the transformation of Chinese medicine from a marginal, sidelined medical practice of the early 20th century, to an essential and high profile part of the national health-care system under the Chinese Communist Party.
Table of Contents
A new, scientific and unified medicine : civil war in China and the new acupuncture, 1945-9p. 14
Pathway for the new medicine : the unification of Chinese and western medicines, 1949-53p. 30
Modernizing the old : the creation of a 'traditional' Chinese medicine, 1953-6p. 63
Establishing a national treasure trove of TCM : the standardization of Chinese medicine, 1957-63p. 109
Names of first Chinese medical practitioners brought to Beijing from around China to staff the newly set up Research Academy of TCM in 1955p. 154
National TCM course curricula for years 1981 and 1997p. 161
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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