Catalogue


The 1940s /
Robert Sickels.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 2004.
description
xxiv, 269 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0313312990 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 2004.
isbn
0313312990 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
5331545
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [255]-262) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2004
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Summaries
Short Annotation
This volume captures the many aspects of popular culture during 1940s America.
Long Description
The 1940s were like no other time in U.S. history. The nation went to war in both Europe and Asia; meanwhile, the American population shifted from being largely rural to predominantly urban. The "greatest generation" saw, and helped, America change forever. Robert Sickels captures the many ways in which the nation's popular culture grew and evolved. The 1940s saw the emergence of such phenomena as television, Levittown housing, comic-book superheroes, pre-packaged foods, Christian Dior's "New Look," the original swing music, and the first Beatniks. Twelve narrative chapters chronicle the nation's survival during wartime and its path toward unforeseen cultural shifts in the years ahead. Included are chapter bibliographies, a timeline, a cost comparison, and a suggested reading list for students. This latest addition to Greenwood's American Popular Culture Through History series is an invaluable contribution to the study of American popular culture.
Long Description
Twelve narrative chapters chronicle the nation's survival during wartime and its path toward unforeseen cultural shifts in the years ahead. Included are chapter bibliographies, a timeline, a cost comparison, and a suggested reading list for students. This latest addition to Greenwood's American Popular Culture Through History series is an invaluable contribution to the study of American popular culture. The 1940s were like no other time in U.S. history. The nation went to war in both Europe and Asia; meanwhile, the American population shifted from being largely rural to predominantly urban. The greatest generation saw, and helped, America change forever. Robert Sickels captures the many ways in which the nation's popular culture grew and evolved. The 1940s saw the emergence of such phenomena as television, Levittown housing, comic-book superheroes, pre-packaged foods, Christian Dior's New Look, the original swing music, and the first Beatniks. Twelve narrative chapters chronicle the nation's survival during wartime and its path toward unforeseen cultural shifts in the years ahead. Included are chapter bibliographies, a timeline, a cost comparison, and a suggested reading list for students. This latest addition to Greenwood's American Popular Culture Through History series is an invaluable contribution to the study of American popular culture.
Main Description
Twelve narrative chapters chronicle the nation's survival during wartime and its path toward unforeseen cultural shifts in the years ahead. Included are chapter bibliographies, a timeline, a cost comparison, and a suggested reading list for students. This latest addition to Greenwood's American Popular Culture Through History series is an invaluable contribution to the study of American popular culture.
Table of Contents
Series Forewordp. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. xi
Timeline of the 1940sp. xix
Life and Youth During the 1940sp. 1
Everyday Americap. 3
World of Youthp. 27
Popular Culture of the 1940sp. 43
Advertisingp. 45
Architecturep. 65
Fashionp. 79
Foodp. 97
Leisure Activitiesp. 111
Literaturep. 131
Musicp. 155
Performing Artsp. 181
Travelp. 205
Visual Artsp. 219
Cost of Products in the 1940sp. 237
Notesp. 241
Bibliography and Further Readingp. 255
Indexp. 263
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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