Catalogue


The nerve center : lessons in governing from the White House chiefs of staff /
edited by Terry Sullivan ; foreword by James A. Baker, III.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
College Station : Texas A & M University Press, c2004.
description
xvii, 176 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
1585443492 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
College Station : Texas A & M University Press, c2004.
isbn
1585443492 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Members of the forum -- Starting the White House -- Refocusing the White House -- Campaigning, routine, and closing out -- In the governing community.
catalogue key
5331166
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
". . . a very well rounded and detailed analysis of the role of White House Chief of Staff. . . . A key strength of the book is the presentation of views by many former Chiefs of Staff, thereby presenting the reader with an inside and authoritative view of what the position entails. . . . Sullivan does an excellent job in meshing the views of the panelists into his analysis of the Bush transition. . . . offers valuable information to scholars as well as the general public."--Roman Popadiuk, George Bush Library Foundation
�. . . a very well rounded and detailed analysis of the role of White House Chief of Staff. . . . A key strength of the book is the presentation of views by many former Chiefs of Staff, thereby presenting the reader with an inside and authoritative view of what the position entails. . . . Sullivan does an excellent job in meshing the views of the panelists into his analysis of the Bush transition. . . . offers valuable information to scholars as well as the general public.�--Roman Popadiuk, George Bush Library Foundation
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Summaries
Main Description
In what James A. Baker III has called the "worst job in Washington," the chief of staff orchestrates the president's conduct of the U.S. government. He holds the unique responsibility to magnify the time, reach, and voice of the president of the United States. "You need a filter, a person that you have total confidence in who works so closely with you that in effect he is almost an alter ego," Gerald Ford has said. In this volume, resulting from the Washington Forum on the Role of the White House Chief of Staff held in 2000 in Washington, D.C., twelve of the fifteen men who have held the office of chief of staff discuss among themselves and with a select group of participants the challenges, achievements, and failures of their time in that role. Their purpose is to find lessons in governing that will help future chiefs of staff prepare to assume the office and organize the staffs they will lead. These pages of frank and uncensored discussion present in straightforward question-and-answer format the voices of the chiefs of staff themselves concerning the transition from campaign to governance, with its reorganization and refocusing of the president's team, the reelection drive four years later, and eventually, the closing out of an administration. The group also addresses the place of the White House chief of staff within the larger governing community of the Executive Branch, Congress, interest groups, and the press. The American White House sits at the nerve center of world history, and at the core of this nerve center, a massive bureaucratic operation exists to process the flow of information and policy. The White House chief of staff manages that operation. So important has that office become, that to ignore its requirements risks presidential fate itself and indeed, the fate of the republic.
Bowker Data Service Summary
In what James Baker III has called the 'worst job in Washington', the chief of staff orchestrates the president's conduct of the US government. This text presents the voices of the chiefs of staff as they discuss the transition from campaign to governance, the reelection drive every four years, and ultimately, the closing out of an administration.
Short Annotation
12 of the living 15 former White House Chief of Staff discuss, in a question and answer format, the place of the WHCS within the larger governing community of the Executive Branch, Congress, interest groups, and the press.
Unpaid Annotation
"12 of the living 15 former White House Chief of Staff discuss, in a question and answer format, the place of the WHCS within the larger governing community of the Executive Branch, Congress, interest groups, and the press."
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. IX
Governing from the White House: A Forewordp. XIII
Two Operational Dilemmas: An Introductionp. 3
Members of the Forump. 15
Starting the White Housep. 22
Refocusing the White Housep. 47
Campaigning, Routine, and Closing Outp. 77
In the Governing Communityp. 108
Assessing Transition 2001: An Epiloguep. 125
Sponsors' Acknowledgmentsp. 167
Indexp. 171
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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