Catalogue


How much are you making on the war, daddy? : a quick and dirty guide to war profiteering in the George W. Bush Administration /
William D. Hartung.
imprint
New York : Nation Books ; Emeryville, CA : Distributed by Publishers Group West, c2003.
description
xxvi, 182 p. ; 20 cm.
ISBN
1560255617
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Nation Books ; Emeryville, CA : Distributed by Publishers Group West, c2003.
isbn
1560255617
catalogue key
5330883
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
William D. Hartung runs the Arms Trade Resource Center, a project of the World Policy Institute. He is a frequent contributor to The Nation and has appeared on The O'Reilly Factor, 60 Minutes, Newsnight with Aaron Brown, Hannity and Colmes, the Lou Dobbs Show, the Lehrer Newshour and BBC World
Summaries
Main Description
Columnist Paul Krugman has described Bush's melding of political hardball and economic favoritism as "crony capitalism," while Senator John McCain calls it war profiteering. George W. Bush's approach to military spending is a higher-priced version of what went on under the Suharto regime in Indonesia, when corporations connected to the military and the president's inner circle had the inside track on lucrative government contracts. The military budget has increased from $300 billion to more than $400 billion annually since George W. Bush took office. The Iraq invasion and occupation will cost at least another $200 billion over the next three to five years. U.S. policy is now based on what's good for Chevron, Halliburton, Lockheed Martin, Boeing, and Bechtel, not what's good for the average citizen. Dick Cheney's ties to conglomerate Halliburton are the tip of the iceberg since at least thirty-two top officials in the Bush administration served as executives or paid consultants to top weapons contractors before joining the administration. In George W. Bush's Washington, it has reached the point where you can't tell the generals from the arms lobbyists without a scorecard. This book provides that scorecard, in a style designed to provoke action for change.
Main Description
When the Pentagon proposed leasing a fleet of Boeing 747s as military transports -- at a cost of $26 billion -- Senator John McCain complained, "This is war profiteering." But since September 11, Boeing has been quite brazen about this sort of thing. As Harry Stonecipher, a VP at Boeing said, "The purse is now open, and any member of Congress who is seen as trying to stop us from spending the money we need to defend the country will be looking for a job after next November." Welcome to George W. Bush's Washington, where you can't tell the generals from the arms lobbyists without a scorecard. U.S. policy is now based on what's good for Chevron, Halliburton, Lockheed Martin, Boeing, and Bechtel, not what's good for the average citizen. Dick Cheney's ties to arms and oil conglomerate Halliburton are just the tip of the iceberg: at least 32 top officials in the Bush administration served as executives or paid consultants to top weapons contractors before joining the administration. How Much Are You Making on the War, Daddy? is an irreverent, impertinent, and scary tour of the arms industry, its defense intellectuals, and its pals in the White House and Pentagon. Book jacket.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
The 2000 Presidential Elections--Returning to the Scene of the Crimep. 1
Dick Cheney and the Power of the Self-Licking Ice Cream Conep. 23
Donald Rumsfeld and the Princes of Darknessp. 45
The Carlyle Group: Crony Capitalism without Bordersp. 63
The Defense Policy Board: Richard Perle and His Merry Band of Profiteersp. 79
Policy Profiteers: The Role of Right-Wing Think Tanks in Shaping Bush's Foreign Policyp. 91
How the Big Three Weapons-Makers Are Cashing In on the War on Terrorismp. 119
Taking Our Country Back: A Question of Balancep. 147
Acknowledgmentsp. 173
Indexp. 179
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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