Catalogue

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Embodying the postcolonial life : immigrant stories of resistance /
Maurice L. Hall, Jennifer Keane-Dawes, Amardo Rodriguez.
imprint
Amherst, N.Y. : Humanity Books, 2004.
description
166 p.
ISBN
1591022592 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Amherst, N.Y. : Humanity Books, 2004.
isbn
1591022592 (pbk. : alk. paper)
catalogue key
5330774
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Maurice L. Hall is assistant professor in the Communications Department at Villanova University (Pennsylvania) Jennifer Keane-Dawes is director of graduate studies at Norfolk State University (Virginia) Amardo Rodriguez is associate professor of communication and rhetorical studies at Syracuse University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2005
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
This book focuses on the immigrant experiences of Caribbean academics living and working in the United States. Unlike standard texts that present theoretical debates on issues related to post-colonialism, each essay in this work speaks in a personal, passionate, and uncensored way about what it means to live as a Caribbean immigrant in the USA. The experiences here recorded will be familiar to millions of postcolonial peoples who inhabit the First World.
Main Description
This book focuses on the immigrant experiences of Caribbean academics living and working in the United States. Unlike standard texts that present theoretical debates on issues related to postcolonialism, each essay in this work speaks in a personal, passionate, and uncensored way about what it means to live as a Caribbean immigrant in the U.S.A. The experiences here recorded will be familiar to millions of postcolonial peoples who inhabit the First World. As the contributors make clear, the struggles that minority scholars face are daunting. They criticize a theoretical and pedagogical hegemony firmly entrenched in academia, which is inherently hostile to new and different ways of understanding and experiencing the world. They point out their frustrations with having to work with theories and methods that are alien to their experiences and can never make sense of their complex realities. By resisting methods that tend to straightjacket thought and stereotype identities, the authors show how all immigrants can contribute to a more nuanced understanding of the complexity and diversity of our increasingly multicultural society. This unique work will be of great interest to scholars exploring issues of identity, nationality, culture, and power in an era of globalization and postcolonial cultures.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. 9
Prologuep. 11
Mapping the Terrain: The Caribbean as a Postcolonial Spacep. 15
Proverbial Responses to the Stereotype of Quashee: A Postcolonial Identity Negotiation as Consequencep. 25
Theorizing the Worker: An Auto-Ethnographic Reframing of the Meaning(s) of Work from a Postcolonial Perspectivep. 45
Rhythm Nation: On the Origin and Nature of Rhythmp. 67
Positioning the Postcolonial Subject as Illegitimate: Narrating the Experiences of Being Black, Foreign, and Female in US Academiap. 87
On Being Narrative and Being Human: Embodying Our Narrativityp. 101
Dear Jamaica: Immigrant Stories of Cultural Resistancep. 115
The Burden of Postcolonialismp. 137
Our Final Thoughtsp. 155
Indexp. 159
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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