Catalogue

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Vernacular bodies : the politics of reproduction in early modern England /
Mary E. Fissell.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2004.
description
viii, 283 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
ISBN
0199269882 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2004.
isbn
0199269882 (alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction -- Reforming the body -- The womb goes bad -- Protesting and preaching -- Henry Jessey, Sarah Wight, and the struggle to make women's bodies into knowledge -- Culpeper's radical book -- Reforming the family and refiguring the body in the English Revolution -- The restoration crisis in paternity -- Conclusions.
catalogue key
5327486
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [250]-276) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
1. Reforming the Body 2. The Womb Goes Bad 3. Protesting and Preaching 4. Henry Jessy, Sarah Wight, and the Struggle to Make Women's Bodies into Knowledge 5. Culpeper's Radical Book 6. Reforming the Family and Refiguring the Body in the English Revolution 7. The Restoration Crisis in Paternity Conclusion Bibliography
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Summaries
Long Description
Making babies was a mysterious process in early modern England. Mary Fissell employs a wealth of popular sources - ballads, jokes, witchcraft pamphlets, prayerbooks, popular medical manuals - to produce the first account of women's reproductive bodies in early-modern cheap print. Since little was certain about the mysteries of reproduction, the topic lent itself to a rich array of theories. The insides of women's reproductive bodies provided a kind of open interpretive space, aplace where many different models of reproductive processes might be plausible. These models were profoundly shaped by cultural concerns; they afforded many ways to discuss and make sense of social, political, and economic changes such as the Protestant Reformation and the Civil War. They gave ordinarypeople ways of thinking about the changing relations between men and women that characterized these larger social shifts. Fissell offers a new way to think about the history of the body by focusing on women's bodies, showing how ideas about conception, pregnancy, and childbirth were also ways of talking about gender relations and thus all relations of power. Where other histories of the body have focused on learned texts and male bodies, Vernacular Bodies looks at the small books and pamphlets that ordinary people read and listened to - and provides new ways to understand how such people experiencedpolitical conflicts and social change.
Long Description
Making babies was a mysterious process in seventeenth-century England. Fissell uses popular sources - songs, jokes, witchcraft pamphlets, prayerbooks, popular medical manuals - to recover how ordinary men and women understood the processes of reproduction. Because the human body was so often used as a metaphor for social relations, the grand events of high politics such as the English Civil War reshaped popular ideas about conception and pregnancy. This book is the first account of ordinary people's ideas about reproduction, and offers a new way to understand how common folk experienced the sweeping political changes that characterized early modern England.
Main Description
Making babies was a mysterious process in early modern England. Mary Fissell employs a wealth of popular sources - ballads, jokes, witchcraft pamphlets, Prayer Books, popular medical manuals - to produce the first account of women's reproductive bodies in early-modern cheap print. Since littlewas certain about the mysteries of reproduction, the topic lent itself to a rich array of theories. The insides of women's reproductive bodies provided a kind of open interpretive space, a place where many different models of reproductive processes might be plausible. These models were profoundlyshaped by cultural concerns; they afforded many ways to discuss and make sense of social, political, and economic changes such as the Protestant Reformation and the Civil War. They gave ordinary people ways of thinking about the changing relations between men and women that characterized theselarger social shifts. Fissell offers a new way to think about the history of the body by focusing on women's bodies, showing how ideas about conception, pregnancy, and childbirth were also ways of talking about gender relations and thus all relations of power. Where other histories of the body have focused on learnedtexts and male bodies, this study looks at the small books and pamphlets that ordinary people read and listened to - and provides new ways to understand how such people experienced political conflicts and social change.
Main Description
Making babies was a mysterious process in early modern England. Mary Fissell employs a wealth of popular sources - ballads, jokes, witchcraft pamphlets, prayerbooks, popular medical manuals - to produce the first account of women's reproductive bodies in early-modern cheap print. Since littlewas certain about the mysteries of reproduction, the topic lent itself to a rich array of theories. The insides of women's reproductive bodies provided a kind of open interpretive space, a place where many different models of reproductive processes might be plausible. These models were profoundlyshaped by cultural concerns; they afforded many ways to discuss and make sense of social, political, and economic changes such as the Protestant Reformation and the Civil War. They gave ordinary people ways of thinking about the changing relations between men and women that characterized theselarger social shifts. Fissell offers a new way to think about the history of the body by focusing on women's bodies, showing how ideas about conception, pregnancy, and childbirth were also ways of talking about gender relations and thus all relations of power. Where other histories of the body have focused on learnedtexts and male bodies, Vernacular Bodies looks at the small books and pamphlets that ordinary people read and listened to - and provides new ways to understand how such people experienced political conflicts and social change.
Table of Contents
Reforming the Body
The Womb Goes Bad
Protesting and Preaching
Henry Jessy, Sarah Wight, and the Struggle to Make Women's Bodies into Knowledge
Culpeper's Radical Book
Reforming the Family and Refiguring the Body in the English Revolution
The Restoration Crisis in Paternity
Conclusion
Bibliography
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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