Catalogue


Shakespeare's religious language : a dictionary /
R. Chris Hassel, Jr.
imprint
London ; New York : Thoemmes Continuum, 2005.
description
xxiv, 455 p.
ISBN
0826458904
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London ; New York : Thoemmes Continuum, 2005.
isbn
0826458904
catalogue key
5324848
 
Gift to Victoria University Library. Friends of Victoria University Library.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Chris Hassel is the right scholar to grasp the nettle of Shakespeare's religious language, since Hassel's authority where Shakespeare and religion are concerned is well established. "...this dictionary is a mine of helpful information, and everyone will learn something from it."- John D. Cox, Shakespeare Quarterly, 58.1, 2007
'Shakespeare's Religious Language, will undoubtedly become a useful source of systemised information and a helpful tool for further scholarly research in this area.'
'The great strength of Hassel's dictionary is that it is more than a dictionary, stepping past vocabulary into context... scrupulous in explaining what words need not mean...quicker and handier than an online concordance...and goes well beyond a dictionary's basic briefs; the helpfully selective bibliography is particularly strong on recent criticism...it should retain long-term value as a reference work, both for those in search of proof texts and those fascinated by the sinuous operation of Shakespearean religious metaphor.'
"...the subtitle Dictionary...is a misnomer for Hassel's invaluable assemblage. He does much more than supply definitions for the religious language in Shakespeare's plays..." "Hassel's entries are on the mark, clear and graceful...the degree of his specificity is remarkable." "Everywhere I looked in Hassel's entries, I spied learning, deep and wide...Interspersed throughout the Dictionary are pearls of literary insight." "...a valuable and sure guide." Philip C. Kolin, University of Southern Mississippi. Review published in Christianity and Literature 55.2, Winter 2006.
"This book mantains the high quality of previous volumes in the Athlone Shakespeare Dictionary Series... useful for research in both Elizabethan music and Shakespeare's use of music.... This is an authoritative volume that will be an important addition to collections in Elizabethan literature and music"
"This volume is one of the most impressive of the Athlone Shakespeare Dictionaries to appear. Given the recent scholarly interest in the dramatist's religious milieu, it will be a most useful addition to Shakespearean and Renaissance holdings...This volume is a necessary companion to Naseeb Shaheen's Biblical References in Shakespeare's Plays."
"Anyone writing a major, authoritative new reference work on Shakespeare and the Bible needs extraordinarily confident faith and persistent patience. R. Chris Hassel surely had both to have compiled Shakespeare's Religious Language, the product no doubt of decades of fruitful, hard work. Shakespeare and the bible has been the subject of much substantial scholarship as the 23-page "Secondary Bibliography" appended to Hassel's book attests. Hassel does much more than supply definitions for the religious language in Shakespeare's plays. Many of his entries are periscopes of great worth for literary critics and students of theology alike. He explores and explicates the figurative language in the plays and poems that manifests 'Shakespeare's most informed and imaginative religious usage' (xxii) and provides a running summary of scholarship on a particular term or phrase through references to the plethora of critical studies cited in his 'Second Bibliography.'. Moreover, and even more impressively, Hassel gives us a capstone history of the dominant creeds and polemics of the age by copiously cross-referencing and judiciously quoting from contemporary theological literature (sermons, treatises, tracts) where Shakespeare's religious terms are also found and from which he may have borrowed. Quoting Sandra Clark, editor of the Athlone Series, Hassel points out that 'half of all books extant between 1583 and 1623 were theological.' In light of such a devoutly Christian culture, it is not surprising that the 'amount and the range of Shakespeare's religious usage show him to be an unusually well-informed Christian layman even in the midst of this unusually well-informed Christian era' (xix). Hassel's entries are on the mark, clear and graceful. They range from a few short sentences (e.g., ban, confession, doctor, indulgence, procession, tithe pig, toll, St.Steven) to mini essays (e.g., despair, fools, grace, heaven, idolatry, Jew, miracles, sin). The degree of his specificity is remarkable. Anyone who seeks information on Shakespeare's religious language ”it's meaning, documentation, scope, sources and context ”will find in Hassel's dictionary a valuable and sure guide. Had Hassel's Dictionary been available, John Bunyan, I am convinced, would have kept it on his bookshelf."
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2005
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Religious issues and religious discourse were vastly important in the sixteenth and seventeenth century, and religious language is one key to an understanding of Shakespeare's plays and poems. This dictionary discusses just over 1000 words and names in Shakespeare's works that have some religious denotation or connotation. Its unique word-by-word approach allows equal consideration of the full religious nuance of each of these words, from 'abbess' to 'zeal'. It also gradually reveals the persistence, the variety, and the sophistication of Shakespeare's religious usage. Frequent attention is given to the prominence of Reformation controversy in these words, and to Shakespeare's often ingenious and playful metaphoric usage of them. Theological and religious commonplaces also assume a major place in the dictionary, as do overt references to biblical figures, biblical stories, and biblical place-names; biblical allusions; church figures and saints. Entries include angel, baptism, catechism, cross, deaths-head, devil, equivocation, evil, fool, Saint George, God, grace, heaven, idolatry, Jove, Lutheran, merit, Navarre, obsequy, Pope, pray, reform/reformation, sanctify, scripture, sin, soul, troth, unaneled, unction, vice, and York.
Unpaid Annotation
The Athlone Shakespeare Dictionary series provides authoritative guides to major subject areas covered by the poetry and plays. Entries range from a few lines in length to mini-essays, providing the opportunity to explore an important literary or historical concept or idea in depth. Religious issues and religious discourse were vastly important in the sixteenth and seventeenth century and religious language is key to an understanding of Shakespeare's plays and poems. This dictionary discusses just over 1000 words and names in Shakespeare's works that have some religious denotation or connotation. Its unique word-byword approach allows equal consideration of the full religious nuance of each of these words, from ?abbess? to ?zeal.' It also gradually reveals the persistence, the variety, and the sophistication of Shakespeare's religious usage.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Part of the 'Athlone Shakespeare Dictionary Series', this is an A-Z reference guide to religious terms, concepts and references in Shakespeare.
Long Description
Religious issues and religious discourse were vastly important in the sixteenth and seventeenth century and religious language is key to an understanding of Shakespeare's plays and poems. This dictionary discusses just over 1000 words and names in Shakespeare's works that have some religious denotation or connotation. Its unique word-by-word approach allows equal consideration of the full religious nuance of each of these words, from 'abbess' to 'zeal'. It also gradually reveals the persistence, the variety, and the sophistication of Shakespeare's religious usage. Frequent attention is given to the prominence of Reformation controversy in these words, and to Shakespeare's often ingenious and playful metaphoric usage of them. Theological and religious commonplaces also assume a major place in the dictionary, as do overt references to biblical figures, biblical stories and biblical place-names; biblical allusions; church figures and saints. Entries include: angel, baptism, catechism, cross, death's-head, devil, equivocation, evil, fool, Saint George, GOd, grace, heaven, idolatry, Jove, Lutheran, merit, Navarre, obsequy, Pope, pray, reform/reformation, sanctify, scripture, sin, soul, troth, unction, vice, and York. >
Main Description
Religious issues and religious discourse were vastly important in the sixteenth and seventeenth century and religious language is key to an understanding of Shakespeares plays and poems. This dictionary discusses just over 1000 words and names in Shakespeares works that have some religious denotation or connotation. Its unique word-by-word approach allows equal consideration of the full religious nuance of each of these words, from abbess to zeal. It also gradually reveals the persistence, the variety, and the sophistication of Shakespeares religious usage. Frequent attention is given to the prominence of Reformation controversy in these words, and to Shakespeares often ingenious and playful metaphoric usage of them. Theological and religious commonplaces also assume a major place in the dictionary, as do overt references to biblical figures, biblical stories and biblical place-names; biblical allusions; church figures and saints. Entries include: angel, baptism, catechism, cross, deaths-head, devil, equivocation, evil, fool, Saint George, GOd, grace, heaven, idolatry, Jove, Lutheran, merit, Navarre, obsequy, Pope, pray, reform/reformation, sanctify, scripture, sin, soul, troth, unction, vice, and York.
Table of Contents
Series Editor's Preface
Acknowledgments
Abbreviations
Introduction
Dictionary
Primary Bibliography
Secondary Bibliography
Index by Play
Index of entries
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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