Catalogue


Tropical rain forests : an ecological and biogeographical comparison /
Richard Primack and Richard Corlett.
imprint
Malden, MA : Blackwell Pub., 2005.
description
ix, 319 p. : ill. (some col.)
ISBN
0632045132 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Malden, MA : Blackwell Pub., 2005.
isbn
0632045132 (pbk. : alk. paper)
catalogue key
5324836
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-09-01:
Primack (Boston Univ.) and Corlett (Univ. of Hong Kong) have written one of the most stimulating, readable, and informative books available on tropical rain forests. It gives an accurate, up-to-date look at the tropics and the many problems facing these areas. Chapters are broadly titled with numerous subsections. Major topics include tropical rain forests themselves; plants as building blocks (one of the most stimulating sections); primate communities, as related to biogeography and ecology; plant eaters and carnivores; birds as linkages in rain forest communities; fruit bats and gliding animals that inhabit the tree canopy; the many ecologically important insects (restricted to better studied groups such as ants, termites, and bees); and the future of rain forests (especially important is the discussion of differences in problems and pressures in different parts of the world). The book includes 24 pages of references and an adequate index. Figures and black-and-white photographs are well done and pertinent; there are 30 color plates. Anyone with a general knowledge of biology and an interest in the tropics will benefit from this book, which has the potential for use as a textbook in a college course on the subject. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. All levels. K. L. Williams emeritus, Northwestern State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"It is suitable reading for a wide range of students (e.g. biology, anthropology, forestry), and while surveying large parts of recent ecological literature useful for specialists as well." (BLUMEA, April 2010) "This is an excellent text with much to recommend it. The structure is clear and the key points are accessible even to the beginner. There are some great photographs with a large section of colour images showing something of the splendour of the forests. Perhaps its best attribute is the freshness it brings to the topic by virtue of the perspective it takes. There's so much written on rain forests that this novel approach is valuable. It should be seen as a key text for those teaching this area of ecology." British Ecological Society's Teaching Ecology Group"Richard Primack and Richard Corlett make a convincing case that tropical rainforests in the five principal ecoregions have major differences that must be taken into account both for setting research priorities and for addressing local, regional, and national conservation objectives....This may become the most important book on tropical forests published in the first decade of the 21st century." BioScience, March 2006"Overall this is one of the most readable and insightful books on rain forests that I've come across. It is understandable to an amateur natural historian and has enough meat to satisfy the most demanding student. Even if you have no academic interest in rain forests it is well worth reading". British Ecological Society Bulletin"This fascinating book provides a fresh look at the ecology of our world's tropical forests. Most previous texts have taken either a generalized approach……Primack and Corlett's approach is different, since they adopt a comparative analysis of the ecology and biogeography across the world's rain forests. In so doing they highlight the substantial differences between each region, and will reveal to even the most experienced of ecologists just how helpful it can be to alter one's perspective. I strongly recommend this book both to anyone with a professional interest in the biology (or biological conservation) of tropical forests, and to new graduate-level students looking for an overview of rainforest community ecology. Overall, as a final bonus, the book is well written and always thought provoking." Journal of Biogeography 2006 "This fascinating book provides a fresh look at the ecology of our world's tropical forests...I strongly recommend this book both to anyone with a professional interest in the biology (or biological conservation) of tropical forests, and to new graduate-level students looking for an overview of rainforest community ecology...the book is well written and always thought provoking." Journal of Biogeography, January 2006"Graduate students taking tropical field courses or looking for possible research projects will find this book a stimulating source of comparative ecological information and research questions. It would also be an excellent text for a graduate-level course in tropical ecology. This may become the most important book on tropical forests published in the first deade of the 21st century." Bioscience Magazine, March 2006"[Primack and Corlett] have put together a well written and informative text. It leaves no doubt that to understand the ecology and conservation of tropical rain forests, we must understand and appreciate their uniqueness. In sum, this book fills a unique and valuable niche in comparative studies of tropical rain forest ecology." Ecology"This book is logically structured, and uses a comparative approach to address the ecological differences between tropical forests . . . Overall, this book makes a very useful
"This is an excellent text with much to recommend it. The structure is clear and the key points are accessible even to the beginner. There are some great photographs with a large section of colour images showing something of the splendour of the forests. Perhaps its best attribute is the freshness it brings to the topic by virtue of the perspective it takes. There's so much written on rain forests that this novel approach is valuable. It should be seen as a key text for those teaching this area of ecology." British Ecological Society's Teaching Ecology Group "Richard Primack and Richard Corlett make a convincing case that tropical rainforests in the five principal ecoregions have major differences that must be taken into account both for setting research priorities and for addressing local, regional, and national conservation objectives....This may become the most important book on tropical forests published in the first decade of the 21st century." BioScience, March 2006 "Overall this is one of the most readable and insightful books on rain forests that I've come across. It is understandable to an amateur natural historian and has enough meat to satisfy the most demanding student. Even if you have no academic interest in rain forests it is well worth reading". British Ecological Society Bulletin "This fascinating book provides a fresh look at the ecology of our world's tropical forests. Most previous texts have taken either a generalized approach......Primack and Corlett's approach is different, since they adopt a comparative analysis of the ecology and biogeography across the world's rain forests. In so doing they highlight the substantial differences between each region, and will reveal to even the most experienced of ecologists just how helpful it can be to alter one's perspective. I strongly recommend this book both to anyone with a professional interest in the biology (or biological conservation) of tropical forests, and to new graduate-level students looking for an overview of rainforest community ecology. Overall, as a final bonus, the book is well written and always thought provoking." Journal of Biogeography 2006 "This fascinating book provides a fresh look at the ecology of our world's tropical forests...I strongly recommend this book both to anyone with a professional interest in the biology (or biological conservation) of tropical forests, and to new graduate-level students looking for an overview of rainforest community ecology...the book is well written and always thought provoking." Journal of Biogeography, January 2006 "Graduate students taking tropical field courses or looking for possible research projects will find this book a stimulating source of comparative ecological information and research questions. It would also be an excellent text for a graduate-level course in tropical ecology. This may become the most important book on tropical forests published in the first deade of the 21st century." Bioscience Magazine, March 2006 "[Primack and Corlett] have put together a well written and informative text. It leaves no doubt that to understand the ecology and conservation of tropical rain forests, we must understand and appreciate their uniqueness. In sum, this book fills a unique and valuable niche in comparative studies of tropical rain forest ecology." Ecology "This book is logically structured, and uses a comparative approach to address the ecological differences between tropical forests . . . Overall, this book makes a very useful contribution to the literature, and although it is primarily aimed at undergraduates and postgraduates, it will appeal to anyone with an interest in tropical rain forests." Geographical Journal "Space and time barriers in the present day 'global village' have beco
"This is an excellent text with much to recommend it. The structure is clear and the key points are accessible even to the beginner. There are some great photographs with a large section of colour images showing something of the splendour of the forests. Perhaps its best attribute is the freshness it brings to the topic by virtue of the perspective it takes. There's so much written on rain forests that this novel approach is valuable. It should be seen as a key text for those teaching this area of ecology." British Ecological Society's Teaching Ecology Group"Richard Primack and Richard Corlett make a convincing case that tropical rainforests in the five principal ecoregions have major differences that must be taken into account both for setting research priorities and for addressing local, regional, and national conservation objectives....This may become the most important book on tropical forests published in the first decade of the 21st century." BioScience, March 2006"Overall this is one of the most readable and insightful books on rain forests that I've come across. It is understandable to an amateur natural historian and has enough meat to satisfy the most demanding student. Even if you have no academic interest in rain forests it is well worth reading". British Ecological Society Bulletin"This fascinating book provides a fresh look at the ecology of our world's tropical forests. Most previous texts have taken either a generalized approach......Primack and Corlett's approach is different, since they adopt a comparative analysis of the ecology and biogeography across the world's rain forests. In so doing they highlight the substantial differences between each region, and will reveal to even the most experienced of ecologists just how helpful it can be to alter one's perspective. I strongly recommend this book both to anyone with a professional interest in the biology (or biological conservation) of tropical forests, and to new graduate-level students looking for an overview of rainforest community ecology. Overall, as a final bonus, the book is well written and always thought provoking." Journal of Biogeography 2006"This fascinating book provides a fresh look at the ecology of our world's tropical forests...I strongly recommend this book both to anyone with a professional interest in the biology (or biological conservation) of tropical forests, and to new graduate-level students looking for an overview of rainforest community ecology...the book is well written and always thought provoking." Journal of Biogeography, January 2006"Graduate students taking tropical field courses or looking for possible research projects will find this book a stimulating source of comparative ecological information and research questions. It would also be an excellent text for a graduate-level course in tropical ecology. This may become the most important book on tropical forests published in the first deade of the 21st century." Bioscience Magazine, March 2006"[Primack and Corlett] have put together a well written and informative text. It leaves no doubt that to understand the ecology and conservation of tropical rain forests, we must understand and appreciate their uniqueness. In sum, this book fills a unique and valuable niche in comparative studies of tropical rain forest ecology." Ecology"This book is logically structured, and uses a comparative approach to address the ecological differences between tropical forests . . . Overall, this book makes a very useful contribution to the literature, and although it is primarily aimed at undergraduates and postgraduates, it will appeal to anyone with an interest in tropical rain forests." Geographical Journal"We take it for granted that [this] book will serve as a very suitable
"It is suitable reading for a wide range of students (e.g. biology, anthropology, forestry), and while surveying large parts of recent ecological literature useful for specialists as well." (BLUMEA , April 2010)"This is an excellent text with much to recommend it. The structure is clear and the key points are accessible even to the beginner. There are some great photographs with a large section of colour images showing something of the splendour of the forests. Perhaps its best attribute is the freshness it brings to the topic by virtue of the perspective it takes. There''s so much written on rain forests that this novel approach is valuable. It should be seen as a key text for those teaching this area of ecology." British Ecological Society''s Teaching Ecology Group "Richard Primack and Richard Corlett make a convincing case that tropical rainforests in the five principal ecoregions have major differences that must be taken into account both for setting research priorities and for addressing local, regional, and national conservation objectives....This may become the most important book on tropical forests published in the first decade of the 21st century." BioScience, March 2006 "Overall this is one of the most readable and insightful books on rain forests that I''ve come across. It is understandable to an amateur natural historian and has enough meat to satisfy the most demanding student. Even if you have no academic interest in rain forests it is well worth reading". British Ecological Society Bulletin “This fascinating book provides a fresh look at the ecology of our world’s tropical forests. Most previous texts have taken either a generalized approach&&Primack and Corlett’s approach is different, since they adopt a comparative analysis of the ecology and biogeography across the world’s rain forests. In so doing they highlight the substantial differences between each region, and will reveal to even the most experienced of ecologists just how helpful it can be to alter one’s perspective. I strongly recommend this book both to anyone with a professional interest in the biology (or biological conservation) of tropical forests, and to new graduate-level students looking for an overview of rainforest community ecology. Overall, as a final bonus, the book is well written and always thought provoking.” Journal of Biogeography 2006 "This fascinating book provides a fresh look at the ecology of our world''s tropical forests...I strongly recommend this book both to anyone with a professional interest in the biology (or biological conservation) of tropical forests, and to new graduate-level students looking for an overview of rainforest community ecology...the book is well written and always thought provoking." Journal of Biogeography, January 2006 "Graduate students taking tropical field courses or looking for possible research projects will find this book a stimulating source of comparative ecological information and research questions. It would also be an excellent text for a graduate-level course in tropical ecology. This may become the most important book on tropical forests published in the first deade of the 21st century." Bioscience Magazine, March 2006 “[Primack and Corlett] have put together a well written and informative text. It leaves no doubt that to understand the ecology and conservation of tropical rain forests, we must understand and appreciate their uniqueness. In sum, this book fills a unique and valuable niche in comparative studies of tropical rain forest ecology.” Ecology "This book is logically structured, and uses a comparative approach to address the ecological differences between tropical forests . . . Overall, this book makes a very useful contribution to the literature, and although it is primarily aimed at undergraduates and postgraduates, it will appeal to anyone with an interest in tropical rain forests." Geographical Journal "We take it for granted that [this] book will serve as a very suitable guide for understanding this awesome biome." Folia Geobotanica
"This is an excellent text with much to recommend it. The structure is clear and the key points are accessible even to the beginner. There are some great photographs with a large section of colour images showing something of the splendour of the forests. Perhaps its best attribute is the freshness it brings to the topic by virtue of the perspective it takes. There's so much written on rain forests that this novel approach is valuable. It should be seen as a key text for those teaching this area of ecology." British Ecological Society's Teaching Ecology Group"Overall this is one of the most readable and insightful books on rain forests that I've come across. It is understandable to an amateur natural historian and has enough meat to satisfy the most demanding student. Even if you have no academic interest in rain forests it is well worth reading". British Ecological Society BulletinThis fascinating book provides a fresh look at the ecology of our worlds tropical forests. Most previous texts have taken either a generalized approachPrimack and Corletts approach is different, since they adopt a comparative analysis of the ecology and biogeography across the worlds rain forests. In so doing they highlight the substantial differences between each region, and will reveal to even the most experienced of ecologists just how helpful it can be to alter ones perspective. I strongly recommend this book both to anyone with a professional interest in the biology (or biological conservation) of tropical forests, and to new graduate-level students looking for an overview of rainforest community ecology. Overall, as a final bonus, the book is well written and always thought provoking. Journal of Biogeography 2006
"Richard Primack and Richard Corlett make a convincing case that tropical rainforests in the five principal ecoregions have major differences that must be taken into account both for setting research priorities and for addressing local, regional, and national conservation objectives....This may become the most important book on tropical forests published in the first decade of the 21st century." BioScience, March 2006"This is an excellent text with much to recommend it. The structure is clear and the key points are accessible even to the beginner. There are some great photographs with a large section of colour images showing something of the splendour of the forests. Perhaps its best attribute is the freshness it brings to the topic by virtue of the perspective it takes. There's so much written on rain forests that this novel approach is valuable. It should be seen as a key text for those teaching this area of ecology." British Ecological Society's Teaching Ecology Group"Overall this is one of the most readable and insightful books on rain forests that I've come across. It is understandable to an amateur natural historian and has enough meat to satisfy the most demanding student. Even if you have no academic interest in rain forests it is well worth reading". British Ecological Society Bulletin"This fascinating book provides a fresh look at the ecology of our world's tropical forests. Most previous texts have taken either a generalized approach......Primack and Corlett's approach is different, since they adopt a comparative analysis of the ecology and biogeography across the world's rain forests. In so doing they highlight the substantial differences between each region, and will reveal to even the most experienced of ecologists just how helpful it can be to alter one's perspective. I strongly recommend this book both to anyone with a professional interest in the biology (or biological conservation) of tropical forests, and to new graduate-level students looking for an overview of rainforest community ecology. Overall, as a final bonus, the book is well written and always thought provoking." Journal of Biogeography 2006"This fascinating book provides a fresh look at the ecology of our world's tropical forests...I strongly recommend this book both to anyone with a professional interest in the biology (or biological conservation) of tropical forests, and to new graduate-level students looking for an overview of rainforest community ecology...the book is well written and always thought provoking." Journal of Biogeography, January 2006
This is an excellent text with much to recommend it. The structure is clear and the key points are accessible even to the beginner. There are some great photographs with a large section of colour images showing something of the splendour of the forests. Perhaps its best attribute is the freshness it brings to the topic by virtue of the perspective it takes. There''s so much written on rain forests that this novel approach is valuable. It should be seen as a key text for those teaching this area of ecology."ritish Ecological Society''s Teaching Ecology GroupRichard Primack and Richard Corlett make a convincing case that tropical rainforests in the five principal ecoregions have major differences that must be taken into account both for setting research priorities and for addressing local, regional, and national conservation objectives....This may become the most important book on tropical forests published in the first decade of the 21st century."ioScience, March 2006Overall this is one of the most readable and insightful books on rain forests that I''ve come across. It is understandable to an amateur natural historian and has enough meat to satisfy the most demanding student. Even if you have no academic interest in rain forests it is well worth reading".ritish Ecological Society Bulletin"This fascinating book provides a fresh look at the ecology of our world''s tropical forests. Most previous texts have taken either a generalized approach......Primack and Corlett''s approach is different, since they adopt a comparative analysis of the ecology and biogeography across the world''s rain forests. In so doing they highlight the substantial differences between each region, and will reveal to even the most experienced of ecologists just how helpful it can be to alter one''s perspective. I strongly recommend this book both to anyone with a professional interest in the biology (or biological conservation) of tropical forests, and to new graduate-level students looking for an overview of rainforest community ecology. Overall, as a final bonus, the book is well written and always thought provoking." Journal of Biogeography 2006This fascinating book provides a fresh look at the ecology of our world''s tropical forests...I strongly recommend this book both to anyone with a professional interest in the biology (or biological conservation) of tropical forests, and to new graduate-level students looking for an overview of rainforest community ecology...the book is well written and always thought provoking."ournal of Biogeography, January 2006Graduate students taking tropical field courses or looking for possible research projects will find this book a stimulating source of comparative ecological information and research questions. It would also be an excellent text for a graduate-level course in tropical ecology. This may become the most important book on tropical forests published in the first deade of the 21st century."ioscience Magazine, March 2006"[Primack and Corlett] have put together a well written and informative text. It leaves no doubt that to understand the ecology and conservation of tropical rain forests, we must understand and appreciate their uniqueness. In sum, this book fills a unique and valuable niche in comparative studies of tropical rain forest ecology."cologyThis book is logically structured, and uses a comparative approach to address the ecological differences between tropical forests . . . Overall, this book makes a very useful contribution to the literature, and although it is primarily aimed at undergraduates and postgraduates, it will appeal to anyone with an interest in tropical rain forests."eographical JournalSpace and time barriers in the present day ''global village'' have become shorter, and ''exotic'' tropical rain forests appear very attractive for all educated people. We take it for granted that Primack and Corlett''s book will serve as a very suitable guide for understanding this awesome biome." All chapters are adequate
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 2005
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Summaries
Back Cover Copy
The popular view of the tropical rainforest as a monolithic tangle of rain-soaked trees, vines, birds, monkeys and big cats is a widespread myth. Tropical Rain Forests: An Ecological and Biogeographical Comparison explodes that myth by showing that rain forests in different tropical regions are unique despite superficial similarities. Throughout the book the distinctive characteristics of rain forests in tropical Asia, tropical America, Africa, Madagascar, New Guinea, and Australia are emphasized. After an introduction to the climate, biogeographic history and environment of tropical rain forests, successive chapters are devoted to plants, primates, other mammals, birds, canopy animals and insects. The final chapter considers the impact of people on tropical forests and discusses conservation strategies that, based upon the characteristics of particular regions rather than a one-size-fits-all approach, may prove more effective in preserving different forest ecosystems. This exciting new book, filled with natural history examples, figures and stunning photographs, will be invaluable reading for undergraduate students in a wide range of courses. The book's comparative approach also poses many questions that will be of special interest to researchers and advanced students.
Back Cover Copy
The popular view of the tropical rainforest as a monolithic tangle of rain-soaked trees, vines, birds, monkeys and big cats is a widespread myth. Tropical Rain Forests: An Ecological and Biogeographical Comparison explodes that myth by showing that rain forests in different tropical regions are unique despite superficial similarities.Throughout the book the distinctive characteristics of rain forests in tropical Asia, tropical America, Africa, Madagascar, New Guinea, and Australia are emphasized. After an introduction to the climate, biogeographic history and environment of tropical rain forests, successive chapters are devoted to plants, primates, other mammals, birds, canopy animals and insects. The final chapter considers the impact of people on tropical forests and discusses conservation strategies that, based upon the characteristics of particular regions rather than a one-size-fits-all approach, may prove more effective in preserving different forest ecosystems.This exciting new book, filled with natural history examples, figures and stunning photographs, will be invaluable reading for undergraduate students in a wide range of courses. The book's comparative approach also poses many questions that will be of special interest to researchers and advanced students.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Featuring examples from across the tropics, this book introduces the climate, biogeographic history and environment of tropical rain forests, considers the impact of people on tropical forests and discusses conservation strategies based on the characteristics of individual regions.
Main Description
The popular view of the tropical rainforest as a monolithic tangle of rain-soaked trees, vines, birds, monkeys and big cats is a widespread myth. Tropical Rain Forests: An Ecological and Biogeographical Comparison explodes that myth by showing that rain forests in different tropical regions are unique despite superficial similarities.Written by two leading figures in the field, this essential new volume: Emphasizes the distinctive characteristics of rain forests in tropical Asia, tropical America, Africa,Madagascar,New Guinea, and Australia Begins with an introduction to the climate, biogeographic history, and environment of tropical rain forests Presents an extended cross-continental treatment of major animal and plant groups Outlines a research program involving cross-continental comparisons Considers the impact of people on tropical forests and discusses conservation strategies based upon the characteristics of particular regions rather than a one-size-fits-all approach Includes natural history examples, figures, and a stunning collection of color photographs
Unpaid Annotation
This book compares major tropical rainforests of the world and discusses the conservation implications between these zones. Broken into three parts, the book summarizes the significant differences among the five major tropical rainforest zones, highlights the history of human impact in these different regions, and discusses the conservation implications of these differences.
Main Description
The popular view of the tropical rainforest as a monolithic tangle of rain-soaked trees, vines, birds, monkeys and big cats is a widespread myth. Tropical Rain Forests: An Ecological and Biogeographical Comparison explodes that myth by showing that rain forests in different tropical regions are unique despite superficial similarities. Written by two leading figures in the field, this essential new volume: Emphasizes the distinctive characteristics of rain forests in tropical Asia, tropical America, Africa,Madagascar,New Guinea, and Australia Begins with an introduction to the climate, biogeographic history, and environment of tropical rain forests Presents an extended cross-continental treatment of major animal and plant groups Outlines a research program involving cross-continental comparisons Considers the impact of people on tropical forests and discusses conservation strategies based upon the characteristics of particular regions rather than a one-size-fits-all approach Includes natural history examples, figures, and a stunning collection of color photographs
Main Description
The popular view of the tropical rainforest as a monolithic tangle of rain-soaked trees, vines, birds, monkeys and big cats is a widespread myth. Tropical Rain Forests: An Ecological and Biogeographical Comparison explodes that myth by showing that rain forests in different tropical regions are unique despite superficial similarities. Throughout the book the distinctive characteristics of rain forests in tropical Asia, tropical America, Africa, Madagascar, New Guinea, and Australia are emphasized. After an introduction to the climate, biogeographic history and environment of tropical rain forests, successive chapters are devoted to plants, primates, other mammals, birds, canopy animals and insects. The final chapter considers the impact of people on tropical forests and discusses conservation strategies that, based upon the characteristics of particular regions rather than a one-size-fits-all approach, may prove more effective in preserving different forest ecosystems. This exciting new book, filled with natural history examples, figures and stunning photographs, will be invaluable reading for undergraduate students in a wide range of courses. The bookrs"s comparative approach also poses many questions that will be of special interest to researchers and advanced students.
Table of Contents
Preface
Acknowledgments
Many tropical tainforests
What are tropical rainforests?
Where are the tropical rainforests?
Rainforest environments
Rainforest histories
The origns of the similarities and differences
Main rainforests
Conclusions
Further Reading
Plants: the building blocks of the rainforest
Plant distributions
Rainforest structure
How many plant species?
Widespread plant families
Neotropical rainforests
Asian rainforests
Rainforests in New Guinea and Australia
African rainforests
Madagascan rainforests
Conclusions
Further reading
Primate communities: a key to understanding biogeography and ecology
What are primates?
Old World versus New World primates
Primate diets
Primate communities
Primates as seed dispersal agents
Conclusions
Further reading
Carnivores and plant eaters
Carnivores
Herbivores of the forest floor
Conclusions
Further reading
Birds: linkages in the rainforest community
Biogeography
Little, brown, insect-eating birds
Forest frugivores
Fruit size and body size
Flower visitors
Ground dwellers
Woodpeckers
Birds of prey
Scavengers
Night birds
Migration
A comparison of bird communities across continents
Conclusions
Further reading
Bats and gliding animals in the tree canopy
Fruit- and nectar-feeding bats
Feeding habits
Flying behavior
Foraging behavior
Bats as pollinators and seed dispersal agents
Fruit bat conservation
Gliding vertebrates
Conclusions
Further reading
Insects: diverse, abundant, and ecologically important
Butterflies
Ants
Termites
Social wasps
Bees
Conclusions
Further reading
The future of rainforests
Different forests, different threats
The major threats
The forces behind the threats
Global climate change
How bad is it?
Rainforest extinctions
Solutions
Conclusions
Further reading
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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