Catalogue


A great and noble scheme : the tragic story of the expulsion of the French Acadians from their American homeland /
John Mack Faragher.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : W.W Norton & Co., c2005.
description
xx, 562 p., [16] p. of plates. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0393051358 (hardcover)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : W.W Norton & Co., c2005.
isbn
0393051358 (hardcover)
contents note
L'ordre de bon-temps : the French arrival in l'Acadie, 1604-1616 -- Seigneurs et roturiers : the birth of the Acadian people, 1614-1688 -- Cunning is better than force : life in the borderland, 1671-1696 -- Nos amis les ennemis : the English conquest, 1696-1710 -- The meadows of l'Acadie : imperial designs and Acadian desires, 1710-1718 -- "To gett them over by degrees" : controversy over the oath, 1718-1730 -- The French neutrals : years of Acadian prosperity, 1730-1739 -- Plac'd between two fires : Paul Mascarene and imperial war, 1739-1747 -- Discord and desolation : British buildup, 1748-1753 -- Driven away by fire and sword : the siege of Beauséjour, December 1753-july 1755 -- Driven out of the country : the decision to remove the Acadians, june-july 1755 -- Gone, all gone: the expulsion, August-December 1755 -- Removed to a strange land : the exiles, 1755-1758 -- Chasse à mort! : the refugees, 1756-1760 -- The rays of the morning : end of the removal era, 1760-1785 -- Le grand dérangement : memory and history.
catalogue key
5315891
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
BIH Author Biography
John Mack Faragher is the Arthur Unobskey Professor of American History at Yale University. He is also director of Yale's Howard R. Lamar Center for the Study of Frontiers and Borders. Faragher is the author of several prize-winning books on the American frontier, including Daniel Boone: The Life and Legend of an American Pioneer (1992), awarded the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and (with Robert V. Hine) The American West: A New Interpretive History (2000), which won the Western Heritage Award of the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum.
Excerpts
Flap Copy
On September 4, 1755, The Pennsylvania Gazette printed a dispatch from the maritime province of Nova Scotia: "We are now upon a great and noble Scheme of sending the neutral French out of this Province, who have always been secret Enemies, and have encouraged our Savages to cut our Throats. If we effect their Expulsion, it will be one of the greatest Things that ever the English did in America; for by all Accounts, that Part of the Country they possess, is as good Land as any in the World: In case therefore we could get some good English Farmers in their Room, this Province would abound with all Kinds of Provisions." At the time these words were published, New England troops acting under the authority of the colonial governors of Nova Scotia and Massachusetts were systematically rounding up more than seven thousand Acadians, the French-speaking, Catholic inhabitants who lived in communities along the shores of the Bay of Fundy. Men, women, and children alike were crowded into transport vessels and deported in small groups to other British colonies across the continent of North America. Many families were separated-wives from husbands, daughters from mothers-some never to meet again. Another ten thousand or more fled into the forests and spent years living as homeless refugees. Thousands of them were captured and deported to France, while others took up arms in guerrilla resistance. Meanwhile, their property was plundered, their communities were torched, their lands were seized. The campaign to "extirpate" the Acadian people lasted until the end of the Seven Years War in 1763 and cost thousands of lives. In its aftermath, hundreds of surviving Acadians returned to the places they had come to call home over the previous 150 years, but not to their old homes on the Bay of Fundy, which in the meantime had been settled by Yankee families from Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut. Other Acadians migrated to French Louisiana and became the ancestors of today's Cajuns. Piecing together the scattered remnants of Acadian civilization in documents and sources buried deep in archives, historian John Mack Faragher provides the first comprehensive, thoroughly researched, and historically accurate account of the expulsion from both British and Acadian points of view. It is a story filled with fascinating historical characters-native Mikmaq who enjoyed a friendly relationship of cultural exchange and accommodation with the Acadian settlers, French and British governors and military officers isolated in lonely outposts, Yankee merchants and ministers motivated by enterprise and ideology, and ordinary Acadian men and women who insisted on their right to live their own lives, in their own independent ways, on the margins of contesting empires. It is a story of ethnic cleansing in early America, a story with a special poignancy in our own time. * 6 pages of detailed maps showing the settlements of Acadia * 16 pages of black-and-white historical illustrations.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2004-12-13:
Faragher relates, in all its complex, searingly sad details, the story of how the hapless French Acadians were run out of their Nova Scotia homes-a story known to most from Longfellow's Evangeline. Caught between French and British empires, these peaceful farming and fishing families, descendants of French settlers, struggled to maintain their neutrality and their birthright ways. But in 1755, British and colonial New England forces rounded them up and dispersed them by sea throughout North America. Families were broken up; hundreds died on their voyages; their towns were torched; and only small, scattered communities, like the Cajuns of Louisiana, survived into the modern era. "The removal of the Acadians," concludes Faragher (the Yale biographer of Daniel Boone), "was the first episode of state-sponsored ethnic cleansing in American history." More than that, the communities destroyed, some 150 years old, had lived peaceably and intermarried with the Mikmaq natives of the Canadian shores. A way of life that could have been a harbinger of our own era of diversity was destroyed. Unfortunately, the book overwhelms the reader with detail, as if Faragher wanted to set down every fact of Acadian history so it would never again be lost. Instead, it is readers who'll be lost in this gripping tale of a dishonorable affair in American history. B&w illus. Agent, Gerard McCauley. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Library Journal on 2004-12-01:
Faragher (history, Yale Univ.; Daniel Boone: The Life and Legend of an American Pioneer) here looks at the history of the French Acadians from the early 1600s to today. He follows the development of their prosperous farming communities in l'Acadia (Nova Scotia), their symbiotic relationship with the native Mikmaq Indians, and their staunch neutrality in all things imperial. The book centers on the tragic years of 1755-63 when the British forcibly removed the Acadians, destroyed their villages and homesteads, and resettled the area with New Englanders. During this period, approximately 18,000 Acadians were dispersed throughout the British Empire, with devastating consequences: about 10,000 perished owing to starvation, exposure, disease, and warfare. While the royal governor of Nova Scotia claimed their removal was a "cruel necessity" since the Acadians were of French descent and Catholic and therefore not trustworthy as British subjects, Faragher makes the case that the removal of the Acadians was in reality an "ethnic cleansing" similar to what happened in Yugoslavia in the 1990s; he also looks at the aftermath and subsequent historical debates. Well written and researched, this important look at an often overlooked period in American history will appeal to both lay readers and scholars. Recommended for academic and larger public libraries.-Robert Flatley, Kutztown Univ. Lib., PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews,
Booklist, November 2004
Library Journal, December 2004
Publishers Weekly, December 2004
Globe & Mail, February 2005
Boston Globe, March 2005
Chicago Tribune, March 2005
Quill & Quire, May 2005
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
John Mack Faragher tells the story of the expulsion of the 18,000 Acadians from Nova Scotia in 1755 - deported from Nova Scotia by the British colonial authorities on account of their French ancestry & culture. Most resettled in Louisiana.
Main Description
In 1755, New England troops embarked on a "great and noble scheme" to expel 18,000 French-speaking Acadians ("the neutral French") from Nova Scotia, killing thousands, separating innumerable families, and driving many into forests where they waged a desperate guerrilla resistance. The right of neutrality; to live in peace from the imperial wars waged between France and England; had been one of the founding values of Acadia; its settlers traded and intermarried freely with native Mìkmaq Indians and English Protestants alike. But the Acadians' refusal to swear unconditional allegiance to the British Crown in the mid-eighteenth century gave New Englanders, who had long coveted Nova Scotia's fertile farmland, pretense enough to launch a campaign of ethnic cleansing on a massive scale. John Mack Faragher draws on original research to weave 150 years of history into a gripping narrative of both the civilization of Acadia and the British plot to destroy it.
Main Description
On August 25, 1755, the New York Gazette printed a dispatch from the maritime province of Nova Scotia: "We are now upon a great and noble Scheme of sending the neutral French out of this Province, who have always been our secret Enemies....If we Effect their Expulsion, it will be one of the greatest things that ever the English did in America..."At the time these words were written, New England troops were rounding up some 18,000 French-speaking Acadian residents ("the neutral French") at gunpoint and loading them onto transports, separating parents from children and husbands from wives. They were scattered throughout the British Empire. Thousands died. Their lands were expropriated by Yankee settlers from New England.Drawing on original primary research, John Mack Faragher tells the full story of this expulsion in vivid, gripping prose. Following specific Acadian families through the anguish of their removal, he brings to light a tragic chapter in the settlement of America. 40 illustrations and 6 maps.
Main Description
On August 25, 1755, the New York Gazette printed a dispatch from the maritime province of Nova Scotia: "We are now upon a great and noble Scheme of sending the neutral French out of this Province, who have always been our secret Enemies....If we Effect their Expulsion, it will be one of the greatest things that ever the English did in America..." At the time these words were written, New England troops were rounding up some 18,000 French-speaking Acadian residents ("the neutral French") at gunpoint and loading them onto transports, separating parents from children and husbands from wives. They were scattered throughout the British Empire. Thousands died. Their lands were expropriated by Yankee settlers from New England. Drawing on original primary research, John Mack Faragher tells the full story of this expulsion in vivid, gripping prose. Following specific Acadian families through the anguish of their removal, he brings to light a tragic chapter in the settlement of America. 40 illustrations and 6 maps.
Unpaid Annotation
Drawing on original primary research, Faragher follows specific Acadian families through the anguish of their removal and brings to light a tragic chapter in the settlement of America.

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