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Holy estates : marriage and monarchy in Shakespeare and his contemporaries /
Sid Ray.
imprint
Selinsgrove : Susquehanna University Press ; Cranbury, NJ : Associated University Presses, 2004.
description
227 p.
ISBN
1575910810 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Selinsgrove : Susquehanna University Press ; Cranbury, NJ : Associated University Presses, 2004.
isbn
1575910810 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
5315821
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 197-208) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-06-01:
Using feminist and new historicist methodology, Ray (Pace University) identifies her central concerns as, first, the way that the linguistic construction of marriage is analogous to the linguistic construction of monarchy in the early modern period; and second, how this discursive maneuver affects the general population. Ray begins with an insightful close reading of the metaphors of 16th- and 17th-century marriage manuals ("wedlock," "yokefellows," "tying the knot") before turning to an examination of the ways that both Elizabeth I and James I use marital metaphors to describe their relationships to their people. Ray next turns to the work of Mary Wroth, William Shakespeare, John Fletcher, and John Webster to demonstrate how contemporary writers rendered these metaphors concretely in their depiction of women, bondage, and torture. She argues that by opening the issues of marriage to public consumption through text and performance, the writers were able to engage in "political debate." Ray concludes, nonetheless, that while writers may have led the way to a more "diminished English monarchial authority," the husband retained his authority for much longer. She notes that The Book of Common Prayer, 1559 still provides the language of most wedding ceremonies in England and America. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. D. A. Henningfeld Adrian College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2005
Choice, June 2005
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
This volume examines analogies between marital and political ideology in early modern culture, analysing 16th and 17th century marriage tracts and the appropriation of their rhetoric by Shakespeare, Mary Wroth, Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher and John Webster.
Unpaid Annotation
This volume examines analogies between marital and political ideology in early modern culture, analyzing sixteenth-and seventeenth-century marriage tracts and the appropriation of their rhetoric by Shakespeare, Mary Wroth, Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher, and John Webster. Just as the marriage tracts draw explicitly on political metaphors to prescribe marital decorum, early modern political treatises adopt the language of the marriage tracts, using their construction of the family unit as a model for exercising power. The book argues that the metaphors common to these tracts and treatises take on important, often subversive, meanings when they are redeployed in prose fiction and drama. The woman's place within these marital and political discourses and how she fares within early modern domestic and political hierarchies are the book's primary concerns. Included here are detailed discussions of Wroth's Urania, Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew, Titus Andronicus, Othello, and The Tempest, Beaumont and Fletcher's The Maid's Tragedy, and Webster's The Duchess of Malfi. Sid Ray is Associate Professor of English at Pace University in New York.
Table of Contents
Introduction : political marriage and marital politics in early modern Englandp. 13
"Those whom God hath joined together" : bondage metaphors and marital advice in early modern Englandp. 26
"To have and to hold" : arranged marriage, rank, and bondage in Mary Wroth's Uraniap. 53
"Holy knots" : marriage and tyranny in The taming of the shrew and The maid's tragedyp. 76
"Thy servant and thy handmaid" : mutilation and the politics of consent in Titus Andronicus and The Duchess of Malfip. 106
"Mutural society" : marital equity and gynecocracy in Othello and The tempestp. 138
Conclusion : can this marriage be saved?p. 158
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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