Catalogue


Bringing the Empire back home : France in the global age /
Herman Lebovics.
imprint
Durham : Duke University Press, 2004.
description
xvi, 232 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0822332604 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Durham : Duke University Press, 2004.
isbn
0822332604 (cloth : alk. paper)
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
5315658
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Herman Lebovics is Professor of History at Stony Brook University
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-02-01:
The first book in a projected series of works on radical perspectives on history, this is a study of postcolonial France since the 1960s. Lebovics (Stony Brook Univ.) frankly says he wants his book to contribute to an international project of liberation. In the 1970s an international protest movement started in Larzac, in southwest France, when local farmers were joined by groups of other social activists who opposed the government's attempt to take farmland and construct a military base. Lebovics sees France as the birthplace of the attitudes and policies of contemporary antiglobalization. He is concerned with the recent struggles in France about defining the true heritage, and therefore the correct future, of the country. Lebovics argues that France is reassessing how its regions and former colonies have entered into the nation's cultural heritage and discusses in five case studies the struggles in France over the meaning of nation, region, and empire in an American-dominated globalization process. He believes that the question of what it means to be French continues to be the central one in the country's culture, civil society, and politics. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. For specialists in French politics. M. Curtis emeritus, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick
Reviews
Review Quotes
"As usual, Herman Lebovics gives us an innovative and stimulating new perspective, now, on France in the age of globalization."--Patrick Weil, senior research fellow at the National Center for Scientific Research (University of Paris I-Sorbonne) and author of Qu'est-ce qu'un Franais? Histoire de la nationalit franaise depuis la Rvolution ( What is a Frenchman? The History of French Nationality from the Revolution to the Present Day )
"As usual, Herman Lebovics gives us an innovative and stimulating new perspective, now, on France in the age of globalization."-Patrick Weil, senior research fellow at the National Center for Scientific Research (University of Paris I-Sorbonne) and author of Qu'est-ce qu'un Français? Histoire de la nationalité française depuis la Révolution ( What is a Frenchman? The History of French Nationality from the Revolution to the Present Day )
“As usual, Herman Lebovics gives us an innovative and stimulating new perspective, now, on France in the age of globalization.”-Patrick Weil, senior research fellow at the National Center for Scientific Research (University of Paris I-Sorbonne) and author of Qu’est-ce qu’un Fran ais? Histoire de la nationalit fran aise depuis la R volution ( What is a Frenchman? The History of French Nationality from the Revolution to the Present Day )
"How-and even whether-to preserve their once-homogeneous culture in today's open world is one of France's supreme challenges today. With five sharply-etched case studies of cultural conflict-from the World Cup to museums to the defense of the Larzac plateau-Herman Lebovics casts penetrating light on French struggles to establish who they are and who they want to be."-Robert O. Paxton, author of Europe in the 20th Century"This is a must read that redefines the tenor and terrain of postcolonial scholarship." Ann Laura Stoler, author of Race and the Education of Desire"For those eager to understand the social tensions recently so evident in contemporary France, this book makes an excellent starting point."--History, 2007
"How--and even whether--to preserve their once-homogeneous culture in today's open world is one of France's supreme challenges today. With five sharply-etched case studies of cultural conflict--from the World Cup to museums to the defense of the Larzac plateau--Herman Lebovics casts penetrating light on French struggles to establish who they are and who they want to be."--Robert O. Paxton, author of Europe in the 20th Century "This is a must read that redefines the tenor and terrain of postcolonial scholarship." Ann Laura Stoler, author of Race and the Education of Desire "For those eager to understand the social tensions recently so evident in contemporary France, this book makes an excellent starting point."--History, 2007
"How--and even whether--to preserve their once-homogeneous culture in today's open world is one of France's supreme challenges today. With five sharply-etched case studies of cultural conflict--from the world soccer cup to museums to the defense of the Larzac plateau--Herman Lebovics casts penetrating light on French struggles to establish who they are and who they want to be."--Robert O. Paxton, author of Europe in the 20th Century
"How-and even whether-to preserve their once-homogeneous culture in today's open world is one of France's supreme challenges today. With five sharply-etched case studies of cultural conflict-from the world soccer cup to museums to the defense of the Larzac plateau-Herman Lebovics casts penetrating light on French struggles to establish who they are and who they want to be."-Robert O. Paxton, author of Europe in the 20th Century
“How-and even whether-to preserve their once-homogeneous culture in today’s open world is one of France’s supreme challenges today. With five sharply-etched case studies of cultural conflict-from the world soccer cup to museums to the defense of the Larzac plateau-Herman Lebovics casts penetrating light on French struggles to establish who they are and who they want to be.”-Robert O. Paxton, author of Europe in the 20th Century
"Scholars have been talking for some time about the colonial 'legacies' of the postcolonial present. French scholars have only recently and tentatively entered that conversation. Bringing the Empire Back Home makes an analytic and political leap as it takes us to new terrain of insight and locations of connection. Herman Lebovics's version of what counts as French history is compelling, powerful, sensible, and deep. In setting out the direct lines between decolonization in the l960s and the antiglobalization movements that followed, he traces what joined New Caledonian separatists and Larzac farmers, protests against the 'postcolonial military-industrial complex' and the rise of the radical right, the new regionalisms in France in the l970s and the folk hero Bov who smashed McDonald's windows. He identifies how imperial and capitalist expansion have been challenged in forms of popular demonstration, ingenuity, and spectacle that have repeatedly called into question what the 'Republic' is, who has a right to decide its boundaries, and who has what rights in it today. This is a must read that redefines the tenor and terrain of postcolonial scholarship."--Ann Laura Stoler, author of Race and the Education of Desire: Foucault's History of Sexuality and the Colonial Order of Things
"Scholars have been talking for some time about the colonial 'legacies' of the postcolonial present. French scholars have only recently and tentatively entered that conversation. Bringing the Empire Back Home makes an analytic and political leap as it takes us to new terrain of insight and locations of connection. Herman Lebovics's version of what counts as French history is compelling, powerful, sensible, and deep. In setting out the direct lines between decolonization in the l960s and the antiglobalization movements that followed, he traces what joined New Caledonian separatists and Larzac farmers, protests against the 'postcolonial military-industrial complex' and the rise of the radical right, the new regionalisms in France in the l970s and the folk hero Bové who smashed McDonald's windows. He identifies how imperial and capitalist expansion have been challenged in forms of popular demonstration, ingenuity, and spectacle that have repeatedly called into question what the 'Republic' is, who has a right to decide its boundaries, and who has what rights in it today. This is a must read that redefines the tenor and terrain of postcolonial scholarship."-Ann Laura Stoler, author of Race and the Education of Desire: Foucault's History of Sexuality and the Colonial Order of Things
“Scholars have been talking for some time about the colonial ‘legacies’ of the postcolonial present. French scholars have only recently and tentatively entered that conversation. Bringing the Empire Back Home makes an analytic and political leap as it takes us to new terrain of insight and locations of connection. Herman Lebovics’s version of what counts as French history is compelling, powerful, sensible, and deep. In setting out the direct lines between decolonization in the l960s and the antiglobalization movements that followed, he traces what joined New Caledonian separatists and Larzac farmers, protests against the ‘postcolonial military-industrial complex’ and the rise of the radical right, the new regionalisms in France in the l970s and the folk hero Bov who smashed McDonald’s windows. He identifies how imperial and capitalist expansion have been challenged in forms of popular demonstration, ingenuity, and spectacle that have repeatedly called into question what the ‘Republic’ is, who has a right to decide its boundaries, and who has what rights in it today. This is a must read that redefines the tenor and terrain of postcolonial scholarship.”-Ann Laura Stoler, author of Race and the Education of Desire: Foucault’s History of Sexuality and the Colonial Order of Things
This item was reviewed in:
Washington Post, October 2004
Choice, February 2005
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
"As usual, Herman Lebovics gives us an innovative and stimulating new perspective, now, on France in the age of globalization."-Patrick Weil, senior research fellow at the National Center for Scientific Research (University of Paris I-Sorbonne) and author ofQu'est-ce qu'un FranÇais? Histoire de la nationalitÉ franÇaise depuis la RÉvolution(What is a Frenchman? The History of French Nationality from the Revolution to the Present Day)
Back Cover Copy
"How-and even whether-to preserve their once-homogeneous culture in today's open world is one of France's supreme challenges today. With five sharply-etched case studies of cultural conflict-from the world soccer cup to museums to the defense of the Larzac plateau-Herman Lebovics casts penetrating light on French struggles to establish who they are and who they want to be."-Robert O. Paxton, author ofEurope in the 20th Century
Back Cover Copy
"Scholars have been talking for some time about the colonial 'legacies' of the postcolonial present. French scholars have only recently and tentatively entered that conversation.Bringing the Empire Back Homemakes an analytic and political leap as it takes us to new terrain of insight and locations of connection. Herman Lebovics's version of what counts as French history is compelling, powerful, sensible, and deep. In setting out the direct lines between decolonization in the l960s and the antiglobalization movements that followed, he traces what joined New Caledonian separatists and Larzac farmers, protests against the 'postcolonial military-industrial complex' and the rise of the radical right, the new regionalisms in France in the l970s and the folk hero BovÉ who smashed McDonald's windows. He identifies how imperial and capitalist expansion have been challenged in forms of popular demonstration, ingenuity, and spectacle that have repeatedly called into question what the 'Republic' is, who has a right to decide its boundaries, and who has what rights in it today. This is a must read that redefines the tenor and terrain of postcolonial scholarship."-Ann Laura Stoler, author ofRace and the Education of Desire: Foucault'sHistory of Sexualityand the Colonial Order of Things
Bowker Data Service Summary
Herman Lebovics offers an account of how intense disputes about what it means to be French have played out over the past half century, redefining Paris, the regions, & the former colonies in relation to one another & the world at large.
Main Description
Thirty years ago, an international antiglobalization movement was born in the grazing lands of France's Larzac plateau. In the 1970s, Larzac farmers were joined by others from around the world in their efforts to prevent the expansion of a local military base: by ecologists, religious pacifists, and urban leftists, and by social activists including American Indians and South American peasant leaders. In 1999 some of the same farmers who had fought the expansion of the base in the 1970s--including Jos Bov--dismantled the new local McDonald's. That gesture was part of a protest against U.S. tariffs on specified French exports including Roquefort cheese, the region's primary market product. The two struggles--the one against expanding a French army camp intended to train troops for postcolonial wars, the other against American economic might--were landmarks in the global campaign to preserve local cultures. They were also key episodes in the decades-long attempt by the French to define their cultural heritage within a much changed nation, a new Europe, and, especially, an American-dominated world. In Bringing the Empire Back Home , the inventive cultural historian Herman Lebovics provides a riveting account of how intense disputes about what it means to be French have played out over the past half-century, redefining Paris, the regions, and the former colonies in relation to one another and the world at large. In a narrative populated with peasants, people from the former colonies, museum curators, former colonial administrators, left Christians, archaeologists, anthropologists, soccer players and their teenage fans, and, yes, leading government officials, Lebovics reveals contemporary French society and cultures as perhaps the West's most important testing grounds of pluralism and assimilation. A lively cultural history, Bringing the Empire Back Home highlights not only the political significance of France's efforts to synthesize the regional, national, European, ethnic postcolonial, and global but also the chaotic beauty of the endeavor.
Main Description
Thirty years ago, an international antiglobalization movement was born in the grazing lands of France's Larzac plateau. In the 1970s, Larzac farmers were joined by others from around the world in their efforts to prevent the expansion of a local military base: by ecologists, religious pacifists, and urban leftists, and by social activists including American Indians and South American peasant leaders. In 1999 some of the same farmers who had fought the expansion of the base in the 1970s-including José Bové-dismantled the new local McDonald's. That gesture was part of a protest against U.S. tariffs on specified French exports including Roquefort cheese, the region's primary market product. The two struggles-the one against expanding a French army camp intended to train troops for postcolonial wars, the other against American economic might-were landmarks in the global campaign to preserve local cultures. They were also key episodes in the decades-long attempt by the French to define their cultural heritage within a much changed nation, a new Europe, and, especially, an American-dominated world. In Bringing the Empire Back Home , the inventive cultural historian Herman Lebovics provides a riveting account of how intense disputes about what it means to be French have played out over the past half-century, redefining Paris, the regions, and the former colonies in relation to one another and the world at large. In a narrative populated with peasants, people from the former colonies, museum curators, former colonial administrators, left Christians, archaeologists, anthropologists, soccer players and their teenage fans, and, yes, leading government officials, Lebovics reveals contemporary French society and cultures as perhaps the West's most important testing grounds of pluralism and assimilation. A lively cultural history, Bringing the Empire Back Home highlights not only the political significance of France's efforts to synthesize the regional, national, European, ethnic postcolonial, and global but also the chaotic beauty of the endeavor.
Main Description
Thirty years ago, an international antiglobalization movement was born in the grazing lands of France's Larzac plateau. In the 1970s, Larzac farmers were joined by others from around the world in their efforts to prevent the expansion of a local military base: by ecologists, religious pacifists, and urban leftists, and by social activists including American Indians and South American peasant leaders. In 1999 some of the same farmers who had fought the expansion of the base in the 1970s-including JosÉ BovÉ-dismantled the new local McDonald's. That gesture was part of a protest against U.S. tariffs on specified French exports including Roquefort cheese, the region's primary market product. The two struggles-the one against expanding a French army camp intended to train troops for postcolonial wars, the other against American economic might-were landmarks in the global campaign to preserve local cultures. They were also key episodes in the decades-long attempt by the French to define their cultural heritage within a much changed nation, a new Europe, and, especially, an American-dominated world.InBringing the Empire Back Home, the inventive cultural historian Herman Lebovics provides a riveting account of how intense disputes about what it means to be French have played out over the past half-century, redefining Paris, the regions, and the former colonies in relation to one another and the world at large. In a narrative populated with peasants, people from the former colonies, museum curators, former colonial administrators, left Christians, archaeologists, anthropologists, soccer players and their teenage fans, and, yes, leading government officials, Lebovics reveals contemporary French society and cultures as perhaps the West's most important testing grounds of pluralism and assimilation. A lively cultural history,Bringing the Empire Back Homehighlights not only the political significance of France's efforts to synthesize the regional, national, European, ethnic postcolonial, and global but also the chaotic beauty of the endeavor.
Main Description
Thirty years ago, an international antiglobalization movement was born in the grazing lands of France’s Larzac plateau. In the 1970s, Larzac farmers were joined by others from around the world in their efforts to prevent the expansion of a local military base: by ecologists, religious pacifists, and urban leftists, and by social activists including American Indians and South American peasant leaders. In 1999 some of the same farmers who had fought the expansion of the base in the 1970s-including Jos Bov -dismantled the new local McDonald’s. That gesture was part of a protest against U.S. tariffs on specified French exports including Roquefort cheese, the region’s primary market product. The two struggles-the one against expanding a French army camp intended to train troops for postcolonial wars, the other against American economic might-were landmarks in the global campaign to preserve local cultures. They were also key episodes in the decades-long attempt by the French to define their cultural heritage within a much changed nation, a new Europe, and, especially, an American-dominated world. In Bringing the Empire Back Home , the inventive cultural historian Herman Lebovics provides a riveting account of how intense disputes about what it means to be French have played out over the past half-century, redefining Paris, the regions, and the former colonies in relation to one another and the world at large. In a narrative populated with peasants, people from the former colonies, museum curators, former colonial administrators, left Christians, archaeologists, anthropologists, soccer players and their teenage fans, and, yes, leading government officials, Lebovics reveals contemporary French society and cultures as perhaps the West’s most important testing grounds of pluralism and assimilation. A lively cultural history, Bringing the Empire Back Home highlights not only the political significance of France’s efforts to synthesize the regional, national, European, ethnic postcolonial, and global but also the chaotic beauty of the endeavor.
Main Description
Thirty years ago, an international anti-globalization movement was born in the grazing lands of France's Larzac plateau. In the 1970s, Larzac farmers were joined by others from around the world in their efforts to prevent the expansion of a local military base: by ecologists, religious pacifists, and urban leftists, and by social activists including American Indians and South American peasant leaders. In 1999 some of the same farmers who had fought the expansion of the base in the 1970s--including Jos Bov--dismantled the new local McDonald's. That gesture was part of a protest against U.S. tariffs on specified French exports including Roquefort cheese, the region's primary market product. The two struggles--the one against expanding a French army camp intended to train troops for postcolonial wars, the other against American economic might--were landmarks in the global campaign to preserve local cultures. They were also key episodes in the decades-long attempt by the French to define their cultural heritage within a much changed nation, a new Europe, and, especially, an American-dominated world. In Bringing the Empire Back Home , the inventive cultural historian Herman Lebovics provides a riveting account of how intense disputes about what it means to be French have played out over the past half-century, redefining Paris, the regions, and the former colonies in relation to one another and the world at large. In a narrative populated with peasants, people from the former colonies, museum curators, former colonial administrators, left Christians, archaeologists, anthropologists, soccer players and their teenage fans, and, yes, leading government officials, Lebovics reveals contemporary French society and cultures as perhaps the West's most important testing grounds of pluralism and assimilation. A lively cultural history, Bringing the Empire Back Home highlights not only the political significance of France's efforts to synthesize the regional, national, European, ethnic postcolonial, and global but also the chaotic beauty of the endeavour.
Main Description
Thirty years ago, an international anti-globalization movement was born in the grazing lands of France's Larzac plateau. In the 1970s, Larzac farmers were joined by others from around the world in their efforts to prevent the expansion of a local military base: by ecologists, religious pacifists, and urban leftists, and by social activists including American Indians and South American peasant leaders. In 1999 some of the same farmers who had fought the expansion of the base in the 1970s-including José Bové-dismantled the new local McDonald's. That gesture was part of a protest against U.S. tariffs on specified French exports including Roquefort cheese, the region's primary market product. The two struggles-the one against expanding a French army camp intended to train troops for postcolonial wars, the other against American economic might-were landmarks in the global campaign to preserve local cultures. They were also key episodes in the decades-long attempt by the French to define their cultural heritage within a much changed nation, a new Europe, and, especially, an American-dominated world. In Bringing the Empire Back Home, the inventive cultural historian Herman Lebovics provides a riveting account of how intense disputes about what it means to be French have played out over the past half-century, redefining Paris, the regions, and the former colonies in relation to one another and the world at large. In a narrative populated with peasants, people from the former colonies, museum curators, former colonial administrators, left Christians, archaeologists, anthropologists, soccer players and their teenage fans, and, yes, leading government officials, Lebovics reveals contemporary French society and cultures as perhaps the West's most important testing grounds of pluralism and assimilation. A lively cultural history, Bringing the Empire Back Home highlights not only the political significance of France's efforts to synthesize the regional, national, European, ethnic postcolonial, and global but also the chaotic beauty of the endeavour.
Unpaid Annotation
Explores what it means to be French today in light of globalization, European unification, and American domination of the international scene.
Table of Contents
Illustrationsp. ix
About the Seriesp. xi
Prefacep. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Gardarem lo Larzac!p. 13
"What You Did in Africa, Can You Come Back to France and Do It?"p. 58
Combating Guerilla Ethnologyp. 83
The Effect Le Pen: Pluralism or Republicanism?p. 115
The Dance of the Museumsp. 143
Conclusionp. 179
Notesp. 191
Acknowledgmentsp. 219
Indexp. 223
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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