Catalogue


The Stuart court and Europe : essays in politics and political culture /
edited by R. Malcolm Smuts.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1996.
description
xiii, 289 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
052155439X (hc)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1996.
isbn
052155439X (hc)
catalogue key
531524
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Expert analysis on international themes will certainly attract many to this collection."Greg McNamara, Sixteenth Century Journal
"...readers can agree with Parker that Smuts'contributors have provided generally"excellent papers"(p. 282)on a theme of wide and enduring interest." Albion
"This has interdisciplinary dimensions and will be of interest to many students of the period, political as well as cultural." Frank T. Melton, Canadian Journal of History
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
This interdisciplinary collection examines the multiple ties that connected the Stuart court to Europe, and the ways in which these shaped English politics and political culture. Together, the essays demonstrate that even the domestic history of the period can only be understood fully by taking into account the international horizons, concerns and affiliations of the British ruling elite. The opening essays by Jonathan Scott develop a provocative overview of the whole period. The remaining contributions examine topics such as the European roots of common law thought; the nature of national identity; the use of visual display in conveying the grandeur of kingship; the religion of Charles II; and the role of Charles's French mistress, the duchess of Portsmouth, in English and international politics. A concluding chapter by Geoffrey Parker suggests several new avenues for placing the British Isles within a European perspective.
Main Description
This interdisciplinary collection stresses the cosmopolitan nature of society, politics and culture at the Stuart court, and the importance of this cosmopolitanism in shaping political life and culture well beyond the court itself. The essays deal with the actual operation of the court, politics, and the systems of cultural meaning in which political life was embedded. Also included are a provocative overview of the whole period by Jonathan Scott, and a concluding chapter by Geoffrey Parker that suggests several new avenues for placing the British Isles within a European perspective.
Main Description
This interdisciplinary 1996 collection examines the multiple ties that connected the Stuart court to Europe, and the ways in which these shaped English politics and political culture. Together, the essays demonstrate that even the domestic history of the period can only be understood fully by taking into account the international horizons, concerns and affiliations of the British ruling elite. The opening essays by Jonathan Scott develop a provocative overview of the whole period. The remaining contributions examine topics such as the European roots of common law thought; the nature of national identity; the use of visual display in conveying the grandeur of kingship; the religion of Charles II; and the role of Charles's French mistress, the duchess of Portsmouth, in English and international politics. A concluding chapter by Geoffrey Parker suggests several new avenues for placing the British Isles within a European perspective.
Description for Bookstore
This interdisciplinary collection stresses the cosmopolitan nature of society, politics and culture at the Stuart court, and the importance of this cosmopolitanism in shaping political life and culture well beyond the court itself. The essays deal both with the actual operation of the court, politics, and the systems of cultural meaning in which political life was embedded.
Description for Library
This interdisciplinary collection stresses the cosmopolitan nature of society, politics and culture at the Stuart court, and the importance of this cosmopolitanism in shaping political life and culture well beyond the court itself. The essays deal both with the actual operation of the court, politics, and the systems of cultural meaning in which political life was embedded. Also included are a provocative overview of the whole period by Jonathan Scott, and a concluding chapter by Geoffrey Parker which suggests several new avenues for placing the British Isles within a European perspective.
Description for Bookstore
This interdisciplinary 1996 collection stresses the cosmopolitan nature of society, politics and culture at the Stuart court, and the importance of this cosmopolitanism in shaping political life and culture well beyond the court itself. The essays deal both with the actual operation of the court, politics, and the systems of cultural meaning in which political life was embedded.
Table of Contents
Introduction
England's troubles, 1603-1702
The ancient constitution reassessed
The common law, the court and the languages of politics in early modern England
The invention of Britain and the early Stuart masque
Art and the material culture of kingship in early Stuart England
The Hector of Germanie, or the Palsgrave, Prime Elector and Anglo-German relations of early Stuart England: the view from the popular stage
Old English honour in an evil time: aristocratic privilege in the 1620s
The theatre of dynasty Caroline
French philosophy and English politics in interregnum poetry
'Crouching at home and cruel while abroad': Restoration constructions of national and international character Annabel Patterson
The religion of Charles II
The duchess of Portsmouth: English royal consort and French politician
The world beyond Whitehall
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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