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Redefining Elizabethan literature /
Georgia Brown.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge, 2004.
description
viii, 261 p
ISBN
0521831237
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge, 2004.
isbn
0521831237
catalogue key
5310395
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-09-01:
Brown (Queens' College, Cambridge, UK) argues that shame is the pivotal element in the changing writing practices of late Elizabethan England. She finds not only that the writers of the 1590s deliberately and self-consciously exploit literary practices that earlier Elizabethan writers would have eschewed as shameful but also that their texts foreground this shamefulness by calling attention to their own indecency or slightness of form, by indulging in ostentatious digressions, and by subverting the conventions of genre. Shame thus contributes to the changed understanding of literary production that transforms such marginal forms as the epyllion, the sonnet sequence, the complaint, and the verse epistle into the period's characteristic genres. Brown's first chapter explores this understanding of shame. Subsequent chapters focus on Thomas Nashe, the epyllion, and the fictional verse epistle. Although her lucid prose is certainly accessible to upper-division undergraduates, the literature and critical interpretations that Brown addresses will be of most interest to advanced scholars. The bibliography is substantial, and the thorough notes appear as footnotes rather than as endnotes, which is a delight. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. All graduate and research collections. B. E. Brandt South Dakota State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Although Brown's book ... sets itself in opposition to the arguments of earlier books on non-dramatic literature of the 1580s and 90s, sich as Richard Helgerson's Elizabethan Prodigals (1976) it valuably complements them.' Times Literary Supplement
"Brown has written an admirably intelligent and sensitive book that should be of great interest to anyone studying or teaching Elizabethan literature and culture." Renaissance Quarterly Judith Haber, Tufts University
"Brown's complex, smart analytical prose and the discussion's internal cohesiveness result in a provocative new reading of late Elizabethan culture and the Elizabethans' own definition -- or if Brown is correct, redefinition--of literary value." - Wayne A. Chandler, Northwest Missouri State University
"Engages energetically--and sometimes impressively--with both the primary and secondary literatures of the last decade of the sixteenth century." -Gordon Braden, University of Virginia
Review of the hardback: 'Although Brown's book ... sets itself in opposition to the arguments of earlier books on non-dramatic literature of the 1580s and 90s, such as Richard Helgerson's Elizabethan Prodigals (1976) it valuably complements them.' Times Literary Supplement
Review of the hardback: ' ... thought-provoking and challenging book ... well-documented; it offers a precise reading of most of the contemporary critical essays ... it challenges one's desire to contradict her even while admitting that she can be enticingly convincing ... elegantly written ... stimulating, worthwhile read.' Cahiers Elizab thains
Review of the hardback: ' ... thought-provoking and challenging book ... well-documented; it offers a precise reading of most of the contemporary critical essays ... it challenges one's desire to contradict her even while admitting that she can be enticingly convincing ... elegantly written ... stimulating, worthwhile read.' Cahiers Elizabèthains
"The bibliography is substantial, and the thorough notes appear as footnotes rather than as endnotes, which is a delight." CHOICE
' ... thought-provoking and challenging book ... well-documented; it offers a precise reading of most of the contemporary critical essays ... it challenges one's desire to contradict her even while admitting that she can be enticingly convincing ... elegantly written ... stimulating, worthwhile read.' Cahiers Elizabéthains
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 2005
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This volume examines the new definitions of literature and authorship that emerged in one of the most remarkable decades in English literary history, the 1590s. Georgia Brown analyses the period's obsession with shame as both a literary theme and a conscious authorial position.
Description for Bookstore
Redefining Elizabethan Literature explores one of the most remarkable decades in English literary history, the 1590s, focusing on the changing perceptions of the aesthetic as an autonomous sphere of activity. Combining theoretical perspectives with close textual readings, Brown sheds light on the central preoccupations of Elizabethan literary culture.
Description for Bookstore
Redefining Elizabethan Literature explores one of the most remarkable decades in English literary history, the 1590s, focusing on the changing perceptions of the aesthetic as an autonomous sphere of activity. Combining theoretical perspectives with close textual readings, Brown sheds new light on the central preoccupations of Elizabethan literary culture.
Description for Bookstore
Redefining Elizabethan Literature explores one of the most remarkable decades in English literary history, the 1590s, focusing on the changing percep tions of the aesthetic as a sphere of activity in its own right. Georgia Brown uncovers how the period's obsession with shame was expressed in fragmentary and marginal literary forms such as the sonnet sequence, epyllion and complaint. Combining theoretical perspectives with close attention to the structure of a very wide range of Elizabethan texts, Brown analyses the historical and ideological forces inscribed in rhetorical and formal developments.
Main Description
Exploring one of the most remarkable decades in English literary history, the 1590s, Georgia Brown focuses on the changing perceptions of the aesthetic. Brown reveals how the period's obsession with shame was expressed in fragmentary and marginal literary forms such as the sonnet sequence, epyllion and complaint. Combining theoretical perspectives with structural analysis, she studies the historical and ideological forces inscribed in rhetorical and formal developments.
Main Description
Redefining Elizabethan Literature examines the new definitions of literature and authorship that emerged in one of the most remarkable decades in English literary history, the 1590s. Georgia Brown analyses the period's obsession with shame as both a literary theme and a conscious authorial position. She explores the related obsession of this generation of authors with fragmentary and marginal forms of expression, such as the epyllion, paradoxical encomium, sonnet sequence, and complaint. Combining developments in literary theory with close readings of a wide range of Elizabethan texts, Brown casts light on the wholesale eroticisation of Elizabethan literary culture, the form and meaning of Englishness, the function of gender and sexuality in establishing literary authority, and the contexts of the works of Shakespeare, Marlowe, Spenser and Sidney. This study will be of great interest to scholars of Renaissance literature as well as cultural history and gender studies.
Main Description
Redefining Elizabethan Literature examines the new definitions of literature and authorship that emerged in one of the most remarkable decades in English literary history, the 1590s. Georgia Brown analyses the period's obsession with shame as both a literary theme and a conscious authorial position. She explores the related obsession of this generation of authors with fragmentary and marginal forms of expression, such as the epyllion, paradoxical encomium, sonnet sequence, and complaint. Combining recent developments in literary theory with close readings of a wide range of Elizabethan texts, Brown casts new light on the wholesale eroticisation of Elizabethan literary culture, the form and meaning of Englishness, the function of gender and sexuality in establishing literary authority, and the contexts of the works of Shakespeare, Marlowe, Spenser and Sidney. This study will be of great interest to scholars of Renaissance literature as well as cultural history and gender studies.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Generating waste: Thomas Nashe and the production of professional authorship
Literature as fetish
Shame and the subject of history
Epilogue
Bibliography
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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