Catalogue


The fictions of romantic tourism : Radcliffe, Scott, and Mary Shelley /
George Dekker.
imprint
Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, c2005.
description
x, 314 p. : ill.
ISBN
0804750084 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, c2005.
isbn
0804750084 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
5299973
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
George Dekker is the Joseph S. Atha Professor of Humanities Emeritus at Stanford.
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Exemplary Romantic novelists Ann Radcliffe, Sir Walter Scott, and Mary Shelley were likewise keen tourists and influential contributors to the discourse of Romantic tourism. The shaping power of this discoursealready highly developed in poetry, travel literature, and the visual arts by the time they began writingaffected not only what they saw and felt on tour but also how they imagined their greatest novels. Defining both tour and novel as privileged spaces exempt from the boring routines and hampering contingencies of ordinary life, these authors as well as many of their contemporaries and early Romantic predecessors effectively brought the tour into fiction and fiction into the tour. This is the first extended study of the intimate connections between these two major cultural innovations of the later eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, and the first to pay close attention to the active commerce, the fluid interplay, within the larger discourse of Romantic tourism, between British Romantic fiction, poetry, tour books, landscape painting, and book illustration (as exemplified by the collaboration between Scott and J. M. W. Turner).
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-04-01:
For decades, to study Romanticism was to study a few big-name poets and ignore all other writing of the period. Recent critics have sought to right the balance with a number of impressive studies of previously neglected genres, among them the Romantic novel and the literature of tourism. A few scholars have examined the intersection of these two genres, usually either in a single author or with respect to a single location (e.g., Italy, Scotland). Dekker (Stanford) is the first to produce a general book-length study on the way the discourses of Romanticism and travel writing inform one another. After two introductory chapters, the author devotes two chapters each to the three Romantic-era novelists with a considerable interest in travel and tourism: Ann Radcliffe (especially The Italian, The Mysteries of Udolpho, and The Romance of the Forest), Walter Scott (especially Waverley and Guy Mannering), and Mary Shelley (especially Frankenstein and The Last Man). Along the way Thomas Gray, Lord Byron, and the landscape paintings of J. M. W. Turner receive extended consideration. Though Dekker's interpretations are rarely innovative, they are learned, well written, and supported by careful close reading. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. J. T. Lynch Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Newark
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2005
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Summaries
Main Description
Exemplary Romantic novelists Ann Radcliffe, Sir Walter Scott, and Mary Shelley were likewise keen tourists and influential contributors to the discourse of Romantic tourism. The shaping power of this discourse--already highly developed in poetry, travel literature, and the visual arts by the time they began writing--affected not only what they saw and felt on tour but also how they imagined their greatest novels. Defining both tour and novel as privileged spaces exempt from the boring routines and hampering contingencies of ordinary life, these authors as well as many of their contemporaries and early Romantic predecessors effectively brought the tour into fiction and fiction into the tour. This is the first extended study of the intimate connections between these two major cultural innovations of the later eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, and the first to pay close attention to the active commerce, the fluid interplay, within the larger discourse of Romantic tourism, between British Romantic fiction, poetry, tour books, landscape painting, and book illustration (as exemplified by the collaboration between Scott and J. M. W. Turner).
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. viii
Prefacep. ix
Introductionp. 1
The Fictions of Romantic Tourismp. 25
The Fictionality of the Romantic Novelp. 54
Radcliffe the Touristp. 71
Radcliffe and the Fictions of Spiritual Tourismp. 92
Tourist Transport in Waverley and The Heart of Mid-Lothianp. 126
Scott the Tourist: Guy Mannering and the Turner
Illustrationsp. 154
Mary Shelley and the Fictions of Companionable Tourismp. 200
Fictions of Pilgrimage: Italy's "Magical and Memorable Abodes"p. 221
Notesp. 255
Indexp. 301
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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