Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Mohawk Saint : Catherine Tekakwitha and the Jesuits /
Allan Greer.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2005.
description
xiv, 249 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0195174879 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2005.
isbn
0195174879 (alk. paper)
contents note
Beautiful death -- Gandaouagué : a Mohawk childhood -- Poitiers : the making of a Jesuit mystic -- Kahnawake : a Christian Iroquois community -- Body and soul -- Catherine and her sisters -- Curing the afflicted -- Virgins and cannibals -- Epilogue : "our Catherine."
abstract
"The daughter of an Algonquin mother and an Iroquois father, Catherine/Kateri Tekakwitha (1656-1680) has become known over the centuries as a Catholic convert so holy that, almost immediately upon her death, she became the object of a cult. Today she is revered as a patron saint by Native Americans and the patroness of ecology and the environment by Catholics more generally, the first Native North American proposed for sainthood." "Tekakwitha was born at a time of cataclysmic change, as Native Americans of the northeast experienced the effects of European contact and colonization. A convert to Catholicism in the 1670s, she embarked on a physically and mentally grueling program of self-denial, aiming to capture the spiritual power of the newcomers from across the sea. Her story intersects with that of Claude Chauchetiere, a French Jesuit of mystical tendencies who came to America hoping to rescue savages from sin and paganism. But it was Claude himself who needed help to face down his own despair. He became convinced that Tekakwitha was a genuine saint and that conviction gave meaning to his life. Though she lived until just 24, Tekakwitha's severe penances and vivid visions were so pronounced that Chauchetiere wrote an elegiac hagiography shortly after her death." "With this study, Allan Greer has written a dual biography of Tekakwitha and Chauchetiere, unpacking their cultures in Native America and in France. He examines the missionary and conversion activities of the Jesuits in Canada, and explains the Indian religious practices that interweave with converts' Catholic practices. He also relates how Tekakwitha's legend spread through the hagiographies and to areas of the United States, Canada, Europe, and Mexico in the centuries since her death. The book also explores issues of body and soul, illness and healing, sexuality and celibacy, as revealed in the lives of a man and a woman, from profoundly different worlds, who met centuries ago in the remote Mohawk village of Kahnawake."--Jacket.
catalogue key
5299946
 
Includes bibliographical references (pages 207-241) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-09-01:
This book is, in part, a fascinating study of a young female Mohawk resident of Kahnawake (a French mission station for Christian Indians near Montreal) whose evident devotion to Catholicism (including extreme acts of penance and unction) was so affecting that it immediately inspired several hagiographical treatments following her death at age 24 in 1680. It is also a biography of Catherine Tekakwitha's first hagiographer, a French Jesuit named Charles Chauchetiere, whose frequent spiritual struggles for closer union with God were at last resolved in tending to this Mohawk exemplar of Christian piety. The Jesuit missionary from Poitiers then spent the next 15 years "proclaiming her holiness, but also writing about other, living, Christian Iroquois with the warmest admiration." Tekakwitha thereafter has lived long in Catholic lore, becoming the first North American Native to be proposed for official sainthood. Taking an ethnohistorical approach to understanding both the Jesuits and the Indians of Iroquoia, Greer (Univ. of Toronto) masterfully sheds light on everything he writes about and provides a reading of the Native-Jesuit encounter set firmly within the context of "a shifting world of war, epidemics, and colonialism," as well as the Jesuits' own spiritual preoccupations. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. P. Harvey University of Colorado at Colorado Springs
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...a very good examination of the life of Blessed Kateri, her way of lifeand that of her people. It is also a good presentation of the French and theirway of life in France and in New France."--Seventeenth-Century News
"...a very good examination of the life of Blessed Kateri, her way of life and that of her people. It is also a good presentation of the French and their way of life in France and in New France."--Seventeenth-Century News
"Being a Mohawk from Kahnawake, I'm very much aware how Tekakwitha hasbeen appropriated for other purposes since her death in 1680, and how thisaffects our view of her today. Greer has restored her identity as an individualhuman being within a momentous historical and cross-cultural context, whilegiving us a close look at her contemporary Jesuit biographers.Enlightening."--A. Brian Deer, former director, Kahnawake Cultural Center
"Being a Mohawk from Kahnawake, I'm very much aware how Tekakwitha has been appropriated for other purposes since her death in 1680, and how this affects our view of her today. Greer has restored her identity as an individual human being within a momentous historical and cross-culturalcontext, while giving us a close look at her contemporary Jesuit biographers. Enlightening."--A. Brian Deer, former director, Kahnawake Cultural Center
"By narrating the life of Catherine Tekakwitha, a Mohawk woman who becamea Catholic Saint, Allan Greer humanizes the great, transforming encounter ofearly modern Europeans with the natives of North America. Exploiting rare andrich documents with keen insight, Greer recovers a dangerous world roiled bysupernatural struggle. Deftly written and humanely empathetic, Mohawk Saintilluminates the creative interplay of natives and colonists during theexploration of new lands and the discovery of strange spirits."-- Alan Taylor,University of California at Davis, and author of American Colonies
"By narrating the life of Catherine Tekakwitha, a Mohawk woman who became a Catholic Saint, Allan Greer humanizes the great, transforming encounter of early modern Europeans with the natives of North America. Exploiting rare and rich documents with keen insight, Greer recovers a dangerousworld roiled by supernatural struggle. Deftly written and humanely empathetic, Mohawk Saint illuminates the creative interplay of natives and colonists during the exploration of new lands and the discovery of strange spirits."-- Alan Taylor, University of California at Davis, and author of AmericanColonies
"Catherine Tekawitha and the legends she inspired are among the mostfascinating of seventeenth-century North America. Allan Greer has given us arichly documented and beautifully written portrait of her world: of this Mohawkholy woman and the ascetic Christianity she and her sister converts fashionedfor themselves, of the Jesuits who converted and wrote about her and evenbelieved she was a saint. Mohawk Saint provides a new way to understand thewounds and transformations of the colonial encounter."--Natalie Zemon Davis,author of Women on the Margins: Three Seventeenth-Century Lives
"Greer masterfully constructs the inner world of a woman who has stood as a symbol of power and purity to French nationalists, Native, and Catholic Americans for three hundred years. Mohawk Saint exemplifies the methodological innovation and versatility needed to tell the stories of New Worldencounters."--Letters in Canada
"Greer masterfully constructs the inner world of a woman who has stood as a symbol of power and purity to French nationalists, Native, and Catholic Americans for three hundred years. Mohawk Saint exemplifies the methodological innovation and versatility needed to tell the stories of New World encounters."--Letters in Canada "Greer's goal is to create history from hagiography." --The Catholic Historical Review "Mohawk Saint: Catherine Tekakwitha and the Jesuits is a fascinating and beautifully written account of cross-cultural encounter and transformation in seventeenth century New France. Greer's book is a masterpiece of cross-cultural interpretation and contextual analysis." --Hinerario "...a very good examination of the life of Blessed Kateri, her way of life and that of her people. It is also a good presentation of the French and their way of life in France and in New France."--Seventeenth-Century News "This book is an excellent example of what an analysis of life on both sides of the ocean can reap.... I strongly recommend Mohawk Saint to the readers of the Atlantic history list. I also recommend it for anyone interested in colonial America, Native America, spiritual practice, or identity issues in Europe or America. Finally, it is deftly written and would make terrific reading for upper-level and graduate courses."--H-NET "Greer masterfully sheds light on everything he writes about..."--CHOICE "In rescuing the "lily of the Mohawks" form her hagiographers, Allan Greer has produced an utterly fascinating volume."--Michael Walsh
"Greer masterfully constructs the inner world of a woman who has stood as a symbol of power and purity to French nationalists, Native, and Catholic Americans for three hundred years.Mohawk Saintexemplifies the methodological innovation and versatility needed to tell the stories of New World encounters."--Letters in Canada "Greer's goal is to create history from hagiography." --The Catholic Historical Review "Mohawk Saint: Catherine Tekakwitha and the Jesuitsis a fascinating and beautifully written account of cross-cultural encounter and transformation in seventeenth century New France. Greer's book is a masterpiece of cross-cultural interpretation and contextual analysis." --Hinerario "...a very good examination of the life of Blessed Kateri, her way of life and that of her people. It is also a good presentation of the French and their way of life in France and in New France."--Seventeenth-Century News "This book is an excellent example of what an analysis of life on both sides of the ocean can reap.... I strongly recommendMohawk Saintto the readers of the Atlantic history list. I also recommend it for anyone interested in colonial America, Native America, spiritual practice, or identity issues in Europe or America. Finally, it is deftly written and would make terrific reading for upper-level and graduate courses."--H-NET "Greer masterfully sheds light on everything he writes about..."--CHOICE "In rescuing the "lily of the Mohawks" form her hagiographers, Allan Greer has produced an utterly fascinating volume."--Michael Walsh
"Greer masterfully sheds light on everything he writesabout..."--CHOICE
"Greer masterfully sheds light on everything he writes about..."--CHOICE
"Greer's goal is to create history from hagiography." --The CatholicHistorical Review
"Greer's goal is to create history from hagiography." --The Catholic Historical Review
"Greer's goal is to create history from hagiography." --The Catholic Historical Review "Mohawk Saint: Catherine Tekakwitha and the Jesuits is a fascinating and beautifully written account of cross-cultural encounter and transformation in seventeenth century New France. Greer's book is a masterpiece of cross-cultural interpretation and contextual analysis." --Hinerario "...a very good examination of the life of Blessed Kateri, her way of life and that of her people. It is also a good presentation of the French and their way of life in France and in New France."--Seventeenth-Century News "This book is an excellent example of what an analysis of life on both sides of the ocean can reap.... I strongly recommend Mohawk Saint to the readers of the Atlantic history list. I also recommend it for anyone interested in colonial America, Native America, spiritual practice, or identity issues in Europe or America. Finally, it is deftly written and would make terrific reading for upper-level and graduate courses."--H-NET "Greer masterfully sheds light on everything he writes about..."--CHOICE "In rescuing the "lily of the Mohawks" form her hagiographers, Allan Greer has produced an utterly fascinating volume."--Michael Walsh
"In rescuing the "lily of the Mohawks" from her hagiograhers, Allan Greerhas produced an utterly fascinating volume."--Michael Walsh
"In rescuing the "lily of the Mohawks" from her hagiograhers, Allan Greer has produced an utterly fascinating volume."--Michael Walsh
In rescuing the "lily of the Mohawks" from her hagiographers, Allan Greer has produced an utterly fascinating volume.
"It's about time that a gifted historian wrenched Catherine Tekakwitha outof the hands of the hagiographers. Allan Greer makes the most of thatopportunity, recasting the remarkable story of Catherine's life as a kind ofcase study in Native American and European cultural syncretism. A first-ratebook on a fundamentally important theme."--John Demos, author of The UnredeemedCaptive: A Family Story from Early America
"It's about time that a gifted historian wrenched Catherine Tekakwitha out of the hands of the hagiographers. Allan Greer makes the most of that opportunity, recasting the remarkable story of Catherine's life as a kind of case study in Native American and European cultural syncretism. Afirst-rate book on a fundamentally important theme."--John Demos, author of The Unredeemed Captive: A Family Story from Early America
"Mohawk Saint: Catherine Tekakwitha and the Jesuits is a fascinating andbeautifully written account of cross-cultural encounter and transformation inseventeenth century New France. Greer's book is a masterpiece of cross-culturalinterpretation and contextual analysis." --Hinerario
"Mohawk Saint: Catherine Tekakwitha and the Jesuits is a fascinating and beautifully written account of cross-cultural encounter and transformation in seventeenth century New France. Greer's book is a masterpiece of cross-cultural interpretation and contextual analysis." --Hinerario
"This book is an excellent example of what an analysis of life on bothsides of the ocean can reap.... I strongly recommend Mohawk Saint to the readersof the Atlantic history list. I also recommend it for anyone interested incolonial America, Native America, spiritual practice, or identity issues inEurope or America. Finally, it is deftly written and would make terrificreading for upper-level and graduate courses."--H-NET
"This book is an excellent example of what an analysis of life on both sides of the ocean can reap.... I strongly recommend Mohawk Saint to the readers of the Atlantic history list. I also recommend it for anyone interested in colonial America, Native America, spiritual practice, or identityissues in Europe or America. Finally, it is deftly written and would make terrific reading for upper-level and graduate courses."--H-NET
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 2005
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
The daughter of a Algonquin mother and an Iroquois father, Catherine/Kateri Tekakwitha (1656-1680) has become known over the centuries as a Catholic convert so holy that, almost immediately upon her death, she became the object of a cult. Today she is revered as a patron saint by Native Americans and the patroness of ecology and the environment by Catholics more generally, the first Native North American proposed for sainthood. Tekakwitha was born at a time of cataclysmic change, as Native Americans of the northeast experienced the effects of European contact and colonization. A convert to Catholicism in the 1670s, she embarked on a physically and mentally grueling program of self-denial, aiming to capture the spiritual power of the newcomers from across the sea. Her story intersects with that of Claude Chauchetière, a French Jesuit of mystical tendencies who came to America hoping to rescue savages from sinand paganism. But it was Claude himself who needed help to face down his own despair. He became convinced that Tekakwitha was a genuine saint and that conviction gave meaning to his life. Though she lived until just 24, Tekakwitha's severe penances and vivid visions were so pronounced that Chauchetièrewrote an elegiac hagiography shortly after her death. With this richly crafted study, Allan Greer has written a dual biography of Tekakwitha and Chauchetière, unpacking their cultures in Native America and in France. He examines the missionary and conversion activities of the Jesuits in Canada, and explains the Indian religious practices that interweave with converts' Catholic practices. He also relates how Tekakwitha's legend spread through the hagiographies and to areas of the United States, Canada, Europe, and Mexico in the centuriessince her death. The book also explores issues of body and soul, illness and healing, sexuality and celibacy, as revealed in the lives of a man and a woman, from profoundly different worlds, who met centuries ago in the remote Mohawk village of Kahnawake.
Main Description
The daughter of a Algonquin mother and an Iroquois father, Catherine/Kateri Tekakwitha (1656-1680) has become known over the centuries as a Catholic convert so holy that, almost immediately upon her death, she became the object of a cult. Today she is revered as a patron saint by NativeAmericans and the patroness of ecology and the environment by Catholics more generally, the first Native North American proposed for sainthood. Tekakwitha was born at a time of cataclysmic change, as Native Americans of the northeast experienced the effects of European contact and colonization. A convert to Catholicism in the 1670s, she embarked on a physically and mentally grueling program of self-denial, aiming to capture the spiritualpower of the newcomers from across the sea. Her story intersects with that of Claude Chauchetiere, a French Jesuit of mystical tendencies who came to America hoping to rescue savages from sin and paganism. But it was Claude himself who needed help to face down his own despair. He became convincedthat Tekakwitha was a genuine saint and that conviction gave meaning to his life. Though she lived until just 24, Tekakwitha's severe penances and vivid visions were so pronounced that Chauchetiere wrote an elegiac hagiography shortly after her death. With this richly crafted study, Allan Greer has written a dual biography of Tekakwitha and Chauchetiere, unpacking their cultures in Native America and in France. He examines the missionary and conversion activities of the Jesuits in Canada, and explains the Indian religious practices thatinterweave with converts' Catholic practices. He also relates how Tekakwitha's legend spread through the hagiographies and to areas of the United States, Canada, Europe, and Mexico in the centuries since her death. The book also explores issues of body and soul, illness and healing, sexuality andcelibacy, as revealed in the lives of a man and a woman, from profoundly different worlds, who met centuries ago in the remote Mohawk village of Kahnawake.
Main Description
The daughter of a Algonquin mother and an Iroquois father, Catherine/Kateri Tekakwitha (1656-1680) has become known over the centuries as a Catholic convert so holy that, almost immediately upon her death, she became the object of a cult. Today she is revered as a patron saint by Native Americans and the patroness of ecology and the environment by Catholics more generally, the first Native North American proposed for sainthood. Tekakwitha was born at a time of cataclysmic change, as Native Americans of the northeast experienced the effects of European contact and colonization. A convert to Catholicism in the 1670s, she embarked on a physically and mentally grueling program of self-denial, aiming to capture the spiritual power of the newcomers from across the sea. Her story intersects with that of Claude Chaucheti re, a French Jesuit of mystical tendencies who came to America hoping to rescue savages from sin and paganism. But it was Claude himself who needed help to face down his own despair. He became convinced that Tekakwitha was a genuine saint and that conviction gave meaning to his life. Though she lived until just 24, Tekakwitha's severe penances and vivid visions were so pronounced that Chaucheti re wrote an elegiac hagiography shortly after her death. With this richly crafted study, Allan Greer has written a dual biography of Tekakwitha and Chaucheti re, unpacking their cultures in Native America and in France. He examines the missionary and conversion activities of the Jesuits in Canada, and explains the Indian religious practices that interweave with converts' Catholic practices. He also relates how Tekakwitha's legend spread through the hagiographies and to areas of the United States, Canada, Europe, and Mexico in the centuries since her death. The book also explores issues of body and soul, illness and healing, sexuality and celibacy, as revealed in the lives of a man and a woman, from profoundly different worlds, who met centuries ago in the remote Mohawk village of Kahnawake.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem