Catalogue


The selected essays of Donald Greene /
edited by John L. Abbott.
imprint
Lewisburg, Pa. : Bucknell University Press, c2004.
description
355 p.
ISBN
0838755720 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
uniform title
imprint
Lewisburg, Pa. : Bucknell University Press, c2004.
isbn
0838755720 (alk. paper)
contents note
Preface to The age of exuberance -- The study of eighteenth-century literature : past, present, and future -- Augustinianism and empiricism : a note on eighteenth-century English intellectual history -- Logical structure in eighteenth-century poetry -- The sin of pride : a sketch for a literary exploration -- "Tis a pretty book, Mr. Boswell, but--" -- Secret far dearer to him than his life : Johnson's vile melancholy reconsidered -- The logia of Samuel Johnson and the quest for the historical Johnson -- Western Canadian literature -- Literature of metaliterature? : thoughts on traditional literary study -- The original of Pemberley -- The great Long Beach Waugh memorial : Evelyn Waugh's hollywood.
catalogue key
5299891
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2005
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Donald Greene suggested that the eighteenth century should be seen as "The Age of Exuberance." It was an era unmatched, he argued, for intellectual ferment and literary accomplishment of the highest order. In his numerous books and in an essay canon that has few scholarly parallels in the postwar period, Greene helped recenter not only the age as a whole but also its principal writer, Samuel Johnson. He did so with a consistent scholarly commitment: one must reexamine intellectual and literary documents always in reference to the milieu and the values of the world in which they were reproduced; one must take no critical judgment, however imposing its author's reputation, on faith. Not only did Greene help redefine "The Age of Exuberance" and Samuel Johnson as few scholars of the post-World War II era, he also demonstrated that his scholarly methodology could illuminate such literary figures as Jane Austen, a near chronological neighbor, and equally a more distant one--Evelyn Waugh. The essays included here provide a sample of a far larger canon that might fairly be characterized as F. R. Leavis did of Johnson's critical commentary--"alive and life-giving."
Unpaid Annotation
Donald Greene suggested that the eighteenth century should be seen as "the age of exuberance". It was an era unmatched, he argued, for intellectual ferment and literary accomplishment of the highest order. The essays included here provide a sample of a far larger canon.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. 7
Editor's Acknowledgementp. 9
Introductionp. 11
The Age of Exuberance
"Preface" to The Age of Exuberancep. 29
"The Study of Eighteenth-Century Literature: Past, Present, and Future"p. 33
"Augustinianism and Empiricism: A Note on Eighteenth-Century English Intellectual History"p. 58
"'Logical Structure' in Eighteenth-Century Poetry"p. 96
"The Sin of Pride: A Sketch for a Literary Exploration"p. 120
Johnson Without Boswell
"'Tis a Pretty Book, Mr. Boswell, But-"p. 147
"'A Secret Far Dearer to Him than His Life': Johnson's 'Vile Melancholy' Reconsidered"p. 173
"The Logia of Samuel Johnson and the Quest for the Historical Johnson"p. 211
The Terrain of Literature
"Western Canadian Literature"p. 243
"Literature or Metaliterature?: Thoughts on Traditional Literary Study"p. 268
"The Original of Pemberley"p. 301
"The Great Long Beach Waugh Memorial"; "Evelyn Waugh's Hollywood"p. 327
Indexp. 343
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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