Catalogue


Race, class and power in the building of Richmond, 1870-1920 /
Steven J. Hoffman.
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2004.
description
viii, 232 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0786416165 (softcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2004.
isbn
0786416165 (softcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Richmond elites and the city-building process -- The limitations of a constrained elite -- Public health and the economy : the negative effect of discrimination on the city building agenda of Richmond's commercial-civic elites -- Political action and the city-building process -- Unintended outcomes : community building and its effect on the city-building process.
catalogue key
5296011
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 211-221) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Steven J. Hoffman teaches history at Southeast Missouri State University. He lives in Cape Girardeau, Missouri
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2004
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Using post-Civil War Richmond, Virginia, as a case study, this text explores the role of race and class in the city building process from 1870 to 1920.
Main Description
Using postCivil War Richmond, Virginia, as a case study, Hoffman explores the role of race and class in the city building process from 1870 to 1920. Richmond's railroad connections enabled the city to participate in the commercial expansion that accompanied the rise of the New South. A highly compact city of mixed residential, industrial and commercial space at the end of the Civil War, Richmond remained a classic example of what historians call a "walking city" through the end of the century. As city streets were improved and public transportation became available, the city's white merchants and emerging white middle class sought homes removed from the congested downtown. The city's African American and white workers generally could not afford to take part in this residential migration. As a result, the mixture of race and class that had existed in the city since its inception began to disappear. The city of Richmond exemplified characteristics of both Northern and Southern cities during the period from 1870 to 1920. Retreating Confederate soldiers had started fires that destroyed the city in 1865, but by 1870, the former capital of the Confederacy was on the road to recovery from war and reconstruction, reestablishing itself as an important manufacturing and trade center. The city's size, diversity and economic position at the time not only allows for comparisons to both Northern and Southern cities but also permits an analysis of the role of groups other than the elite in city building process. By taking a look at Richmond, we are able to see a more complete picture of how American cities have come to be the way they are.
Main Description
Using post-Civil War Richmond, Virginia, as a case study, Hoffman explores the role of race and class in the city building process from 1870 to 1920. Richmond's railroad connections enabled the city to participate in the commercial expansion that accompanied the rise of the New South. A highly compact city of mixed residential, industrial and commercial space at the end of the Civil War, Richmond remained a classic example of what historians call a walking city through the end of the century. As city streets were improved and public transportation became available, the city's white merchants and emerging white middle class sought homes removed from the congested downtown. The city's African American and white workers generally could not afford to take part in this residential migration. As a result, the mixture of race and class that had existed in the city since its inception began to disappear. The city of Richmond exemplified characteristics of both Northern and Southern cities during the period from 1870 to 1920. Retreating Confederate soldiers had started fires that destroyed the city in 1865, but by 1870, the former capital of the Confederacy was on the road to recovery from war and reconstruction, reestablishing itself as an important manufacturing and trade center. The city's size, diversity and economic position at the time not only allows for comparisons to both Northern and Southern cities but also permits an analysis of the role of groups other than the elite in city building process. By taking a look at Richmond, we are able to see a more complete picture of how American cities have come to be the way they are.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vi
List of Tables, Figures and Mapsp. viii
Introductionp. 1
Richmond Elites and the City-Building Processp. 17
The Limitations of a Constrained Elitep. 45
Public Health and the Economy: The Negative Effect of Discrimination on the City Building Agenda of Richmond's Commercial-Civic Elitesp. 79
Political Action and the City-Building Processp. 113
Unintended Outcomes: Community Building and its Effect on the City-Building Processp. 143
Conclusionp. 185
Chapter Notesp. 189
Bibliographyp. 211
Indexp. 223
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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