Catalogue


Napoleon and the British /
Stuart Semmel.
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2004.
description
xii, 354 p. : ill.
ISBN
0300090013 (cl. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2004.
isbn
0300090013 (cl. : alk. paper)
catalogue key
5289754
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Stuart Semmel is assistant professor of history at the University of Delaware.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-07-01:
Semmel (Univ. of Delaware) offers numerous insights--some real, some imagined--into Napoleon's significance, especially as Britain progressed into the 19th century. The author admits that he is not overly concerned with Bonaparte's military achievements or civil legislation, which generally constitutes the bulk of familiar courses. Rather, he is concerned with aspects of Napoleon's legacy that some historians believe did not end with exile on St. Helena but lasted until WW I. With this in mind, Semmel examines some of the more intangible parts of 19th-century life and angst. He pays special attention to topics such as national character and identity. Instead of pages of prose, however, Semmel quotes voluminously from British politicians, poets, and authors of the period who, in speaking for themselves, speak also to the doubts and fears of their countrymen. Each chapter begins with one or more applicable quotations, helping to identify the topics to follow. The author assumes a good bit of specific knowledge of Napoleon on the part of readers but widely opens a window so that the influence of Napoleon upon British history and thought becomes readily apparent. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. S. A. Syme Coastal Carolina University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A thorough and illuminating book."Paul Johnson, The Sunday Telegraph
This item was reviewed in:
PW Annex Reviews, November 2004
Choice, July 2005
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
What did Napoleon Bonaparte mean to the British people? This engaging book reconstructs the role that the French leader played in the British political, cultural, and religious imagination in the early nineteenth century. Denounced by many as a tyrant or monster, Napoleon nevertheless had sympathizers in Britain. Stuart Semmel explores the ways in which the British used Napoleon to think about their own history, identity, and destiny. Many attacked Napoleon but worried that the British national character might not be adequate to the task of defeating him. Others, radicals and reformers, used Napoleon's example to criticize the British constitution. Semmel mines a wide array of sources--ranging from political pamphlets and astrological almanacs to sonnets by canonical Romantic poets--to reveal surprising corners of late Hanoverian politics and culture.
Short Annotation
What did Napoleon Bonaparte mean to the British people? This engaging book reconstructs the role that the French leader played in the British political, cultural, and religious imagination in the early nineteenth century.
Main Description
What did Napoleon Bonaparte mean to the British people? This engaging book reconstructs the role that the French leader played in the British political, cultural, and religious imagination in the early nineteenth century. Denounced by many as a tyrant or monster, Napoleon nevertheless had sympathizers in Britain. Stuart Semmel explores the ways in which the British used Napoleon to think about their own history, identity, and destiny.Many attacked Napoleon but worried that the British national character might not be adequate to the task of defeating him. Others, radicals and reformers, used Napoleon's example to criticize the British constitution. Semmel mines a wide array of sourcesranging from political pamphlets and astrological almanacs to sonnets by canonical Romantic poetsto reveal surprising corners of late Hanoverian politics and culture.
Bowker Data Service Summary
British contemporaries did their best to hate Napoleon, & many succeeded very well. However, the self-appointed emperor of the French was also widely admired, respected & feared. Stuart Semmel explores the complex attitudes of the British towards their greatest enemy.
Main Description
What did Napoleon Bonaparte mean to the British people? This engaging book reconstructs the role that the French leader played in the British political, cultural, and religious imagination in the early nineteenth century. Denounced by many as a tyrant or monster, Napoleon nevertheless had sympathizers in Britain. Stuart Semmel explores the ways in which the British used Napoleon to think about their own history, identity, and destiny. Many attacked Napoleon but worried that the British national character might not be adequate to the task of defeating him. Others, radicals and reformers, used Napoleon's example to criticize the British constitution. Semmel mines a wide array of sourcesranging from political pamphlets and astrological almanacs to sonnets by canonical Romantic poetsto reveal surprising corners of late Hanoverian politics and culture.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. viii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
A Note on Spelling and Punctuationp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Classifying Napoleonp. 19
National Character and National Anxietyp. 38
The Pious Proteus and the Nation's Destinyp. 72
The Imperial Sans-culottep. 107
From Elba to St. Helenap. 147
Radicals, "Legitimacy," and Historyp. 175
The Politics of Exilep. 200
Fallen Greatnessp. 221
Epilogue: The Historical Napoleonp. 240
Notesp. 251
Bibliographyp. 315
Indexp. 343
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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