Catalogue


Your past and the press! controversial presidential appointments : a study focusing on the impact of interest groups and media activity on the appointment process /
Joseph Michael Green.
imprint
Dallas : University Press of America, c2004.
description
x, 167 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0761828028
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Dallas : University Press of America, c2004.
isbn
0761828028
catalogue key
5261622
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 159-166).
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Joseph Michael Green is Director of the Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program and Director of the RAMP Scholars Program, Central Florida University, Orlando.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-03-01:
This pair of case studies examines how interest groups and media influence the process of confirming senior federal government nominees. Green focuses on the unsuccessful nominations of Robert Bork to the US Supreme Court and Lani Guinier to head the civil rights division of the Justice Department. Although clearly organized like a thesis, the book nonetheless is largely free of academic jargon and is exceptionally readable. Much of it is devoted to chapters on reviewing literature, the life and political ideology of the nominating presidents (Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton), the Senate's role in the nominating process, brief biographies of the two nominees, and the sagas of the two failed nominations. The individual chapters on the roles played by the news media in the Guinier nomination and interest groups in the Bork nomination form the heart of the book. This volume is much more descriptive than analytical and provides a nice summary of events surrounding those failed nominations. It likely will be a pertinent reminder of past events as nominations are made during the second term of George W. Bush. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Primarily for general readers and college undergraduates. R. E. Dewhirst Northwest Missouri State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
This pair of case studies examines how interest groups and media influence the process of confirming senior federal government nominees....the book is largely free of academic jargon and is exceptionally readable....This volume is more more descriptive than analytical and provides a nice summary of events surrounding those failed nominations. It likely will be a pertinent reminder of past events as nominations are made during the second term of George W. Bush. Summing Up: RECOMMENDED. Primarily for general readers and college undergraduates.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2005
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Through exploring the public depiction of Judge Robert Bork and Professor Lani Guinier, Your Past and the Press! elucidates how interest groups and the media influence the confirmation process for top-level government appointees. Illuminating the sequence of events characterized by the derailment of Bork and Guinier, author Joseph Michael Green details the activities surrounding the entire nomination process, from the announcement of a nominee to his/her ultimate defeat.
Long Description
Through exploring the public depiction of Judge Robert Bork and Professor Lani Guinier, Your Past and the Press! elucidates how interest groups and the media influence the confirmation process for top-level government appointees. Illuminating the sequence of events characterized by the derailment of Bork and Guinier, author Joseph Michael Green details the activities surrounding the entire nomination process, from the announcement of a nominee to his/her ultimate defeat. Until recently, the vast majority of studies performed on the appointment process focused solely on the roles of the United States Senate and the nominee during confirmation hearings. This research fills a serious gap in political science literature by focusing on the impact of interest groups and media activity upon presidential decision-making.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. v
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Abstractp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Statement of the Problemp. 1
Historical Background of the Federal Judiciaryp. 3
Antifederalist Movementp. 8
Executive Authorityp. 9
Theoretical Frameworkp. 10
Hypotheses and Research Questionsp. 13
Methodology, Procedures, and Techniquesp. 14
Significance of Researchp. 15
Literature Reviewp. 18
Presidents Ronald Reagan and William Clinton: Biographical Overview and Political Ideologyp. 32
Ronald Reagan: The Early Yearsp. 32
Ronald Reagan: Political Ideologyp. 34
William Clinton: The Early Yearsp. 42
William Clinton: Political Ideologyp. 43
Selection of Nominees by Presidents Reagan and Clintonp. 53
Ronald Reagan's Political Stancep. 53
Ronald Reagan's Nomineesp. 56
William Clinton's Political Stancep. 58
William Clinton's Nomineesp. 61
Odyssey of Bork and Guinier: From Nomination to Defeatp. 66
Robert Borkp. 66
Lani Guinierp. 76
The Role of Congress in the Nomination Confirmation Processp. 84
The Role of the Senatep. 84
Committee Proceduresp. 85
The Interaction Between the Senate and the Presidentp. 86
The Senate Judiciary Committeep. 89
Interest Group Activityp. 95
Impact of Interest Groups on Bork's Nominationp. 95
Judge Bork's Legal Writingsp. 105
Impact of the Media on Bork's Nominationp. 112
Media Activityp. 125
Impact of the Media on Guinier's Nominationp. 126
Professor Guinier's Writingsp. 131
Summaryp. 146
Glossaryp. 151
Bibliographyp. 159
About the Authorp. 167
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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