Catalogue


Doctoring the South : southern physicians and everyday medicine in the mid-nineteenth century /
Steven M. Stowe.
imprint
Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, 2004.
description
x, 373 p.
ISBN
0807828858 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, 2004.
isbn
0807828858 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
5258474
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Stowe examines the role of the white country doctor in the mid-nineteenth-century South and explores what their training, their practice, and their writings tells us about community and culture in the rural antebellum South.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-04-01:
Doctoring the South is a sociological overview of medical care in the southern states, 1830-1880, incorporating contemporary quotations and anecdotes drawn from medical student theses and physician daybooks, case notes, and diaries. Stowe (Indiana Univ., Bloomington) focuses on allopathy (orthodox medicine) alone, with occasional reference to other types of treatment, e.g., Thomsonianism. He concentrates on the plantation and the farm, not the city. With copious extracts from his primary sources, the author discusses medical education, starting a new medical practice, the economics of rural medicine, and care at the sickbed. He portrays antebellum southern medicine as a meld of medical school background, country or conventional orthodoxy, personal experience, and folk cures. Stowe does not delineate a historical context and does not mention major epidemics such as yellow fever in the Mississippi Valley in 1878. He does not identify significant southern contributions to medicine (such as Crawford Long's use of ether for anesthesia in Georgia in 1842), but he does document the kind of care provided to slaves. The book does not depict the Civil War as having much effect on how southern physicians practiced away from battle. There are no illustrations or copies of pages from the daybooks. ^BSumming Up: Optional. Graduate programs in the history of medicine. R. D. Arcari University of Connecticut Health Center
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A richly evocative reconstruction of medicine and medical practice. [An] important contribution to American cultural history. (Charles E. Rosenberg, Professor of the History of Science, Harvard University , author of Explaining Epidemics)"
"A richly evocative reconstruction of medicine and medical practice. [An] important contribution to American cultural history. (Charles E. Rosenberg, Professor of the History of Science, Harvard University , author of Explaining Epidemics )"
"As a richly documented chronicle of medicine in the mid-nineteenth century, this book is successful and claims a high place in both social history and the history of medicine in America." _ Journal of Southern History
"As a richly documented chronicle of medicine in the mid-nineteenth century, this book is successful and claims a high place in both social history and the history of medicine in America." -- Journal of Southern History
"As a richly documented chronicle of medicine in the mid-nineteenth century, this book is successful and claims a high place in both social history and the history of medicine in America." --Journal of Southern History
"A straight-forward, well documented story of the trials and tribulations of nineteenth century physicians and their patients. . . . A bonanza of information. . . . This fascinating, evocative, and thoughtful book is a significant addition to both Southern and medical history." _ Historian
"A straight-forward, well documented story of the trials and tribulations of nineteenth century physicians and their patients. . . . A bonanza of information. . . . This fascinating, evocative, and thoughtful book is a significant addition to both Southern and medical history." -- Historian
"A straight-forward, well documented story of the trials and tribulations of nineteenth century physicians and their patients. . . . A bonanza of information. . . . This fascinating, evocative, and thoughtful book is a significant addition to both Southern and medical history." --Historian
"Exceedingly well-researched and well-written. . . . It should become the prototype of a new genre, inspiring similar studies in other parts of America." _ South Carolina Historical Magazine
"Exceedingly well-researched and well-written. . . . It should become the prototype of a new genre, inspiring similar studies in other parts of America." -- South Carolina Historical Magazine
"Exceedingly well-researched and well-written. . . . It should become the prototype of a new genre, inspiring similar studies in other parts of America." --South Carolina Historical Magazine
"Fills a particular niche for the student of both southern history and the history of medicine. . . . A fresh and creative view." _ Arkansas Historical Quarterly
"Fills a particular niche for the student of both southern history and the history of medicine. . . . A fresh and creative view." -- Arkansas Historical Quarterly
"Fills a particular niche for the student of both southern history and the history of medicine. . . . A fresh and creative view." --Arkansas Historical Quarterly
"Takes an unconventional look at a conventional topic. . . . An important contribution to studies of southern community life as well as a deeply thoughtful examination of the praxis of regional medical science." -- Journal of Social History
"Takes an unconventional look at a conventional topic. . . . An important contribution to studies of southern community life as well as a deeply thoughtful examination of the praxis of regional medical science." --Journal of Social History
"Takes an unconventional look at a conventional topic. . . . An important contribution to studies of southern community life as well as a deeply thoughtful examination of the praxis of regional medical science." '”Journal of Social History
"This prodigious research is augmented by a well-written narrative that takes readers to southern medical-school classrooms, to doctors' offices, and to the bedsides of the neighbors that they sought to mend and heal. . . . [This] masterful achievement should become a model for . . . medical history." _ Journal of Interdisciplinary History
"This prodigious research is augmented by a well-written narrative that takes readers to southern medical-school classrooms, to doctors' offices, and to the bedsides of the neighbors that they sought to mend and heal. . . . [This] masterful achievement should become a model for . . . medical history." -- Journal of Interdisciplinary History
"This prodigious research is augmented by a well-written narrative that takes readers to southern medical-school classrooms, to doctors' offices, and to the bedsides of the neighbors that they sought to mend and heal. . . . [This] masterful achievement should become a model for . . . medical history." --Journal of Interdisciplinary History
This item was reviewed in:
Doody's Reviews, February 2005
Choice, April 2005
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Offering a new perspective on medical progress in the 19th century, Stowe provides an in-depth study of the mid-century culture of everyday medicine in the south. He illuminates an entire world of sickness and remedy, suffering and hope, and the deep ties between medicine and regional culture.
Long Description
Offering a new perspective on medical progress in the nineteenth century, Steven M. Stowe provides an in-depth study of the midcentury culture of everyday medicine in the South. Reading deeply in the personal letters, daybooks, diaries, bedside notes, and published writings of doctors, Stowe illuminates an entire world of sickness and remedy, suffering and hope, and the deep ties between medicine and regional culture.In a distinct American region where climate, race and slavery, and assumptions about "southernness" profoundly shaped illness and healing in the lives of ordinary people, Stowe argues that southern doctors inhabited a world of skills, medicines, and ideas about sickness that allowed them to play moral, as well as practical, roles in their communities. Looking closely at medical education, bedside encounters, and medicine's larger social aims, he describes a "country orthodoxy" of local, social medical practice that highly valued the "art" of medicine. While not modern in the sense of laboratory science a century later, this country orthodoxy was in its own way modern, Stowe argues, providing a style of caregiving deeply rooted in individual experience, moral values, and a consciousness of place and time.
Main Description
Offering a new perspective on medical progress in the nineteenth century, Steven M. Stowe provides an in-depth study of the midcentury culture of everyday medicine in the South. Reading deeply in the personal letters, daybooks, diaries, bedside notes, and published writings of doctors, Stowe illuminates an entire world of sickness and remedy, suffering and hope, and the deep ties between medicine and regional culture. In a distinct American region where climate, race and slavery, and assumptions about "southernness" profoundly shaped illness and healing in the lives of ordinary people, Stowe argues that southern doctors inhabited a world of skills, medicines, and ideas about sickness that allowed them to play moral, as well as practical, roles in their communities. Looking closely at medical education, bedside encounters, and medicine's larger social aims, he describes a "country orthodoxy" of local, social medical practice that highly valued the "art" of medicine. While not modern in the sense of laboratory science a century later, this country orthodoxy was in its own way modern, Stowe argues, providing a style of caregiving deeply rooted in individual experience, moral values, and a consciousness of place and time.
Main Description
Steven M. Stowe provides an in-depth study of the mid century culture of everyday medicine in the South. Reading the personal letters, day-books, diaries, bedside notes, and published writings of doctors, Stowe illuminates a world of sickness and remedy, suffering and hope, and the ties between medicine and regional culture.
Table of Contents
Introduction : physicians, everyday medicine, and the country orthodox stylep. 1
Men, schools, and careersp. 15
The science of all lifep. 41
Starting outp. 76
Livelihoodp. 101
Bedsidep. 131
The lives of othersp. 167
Landscape, race, and faithp. 200
Witnessingp. 228
Epilogue : the Civil War and the persistence of the country orthodox stylep. 259
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem