Catalogue


An Alabama songbook : ballads, folksongs, and spirituals /
collected by Byron Arnold ; edited with an introduction by Robert W. Halli, Jr.
imprint
Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, c2004.
description
xxv, 299 p. : music ; 27 cm.
ISBN
0817313060
format(s)
Score
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, c2004.
isbn
0817313060
catalogue key
5257645
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [289]-290) and indexes.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Robert W. Halli Jr. is Associate Professor of English and founding Dean of the Honors College at The University of Alabama
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Alabama is a state rich in folksong tradition, from old English ballads sung along the Tennessee River to children's game songs played in Mobile, from the rhythmic work songs of the railroad gandy dancers of Gadsden to the spirituals of the Black Belt. The musical heritage of blacks and whites, rich and poor, hill folk and cotton farmers, these songs endure as a living part of the state's varied past. In the mid 1940s Byron Arnold, an eager young music professor from The University of Alabama, set out to find and record as many of these songs as he could and was rewarded by unstinting cooperation from many informants. Mrs. Julia Greer Marechal of Mobile, for example, was 90 years old, blind, and a semi-invalid, but she sang for Arnold for three hours, allowing the recording of 33 songs and exhausting Arnold and his technician. Helped by such living repositories as Mrs. Marechal, the Arnold collection grew to well over 500 songs, augmented by field notes and remarkable biographical information on the singers. More than 200 significant songs-lullabies, Civil War anthems, African-American gospel and secular songs, fiddle tunes, temperance songs, love ballads, play-party rhymes, and work songs. In the tradition of Alan Lomax'sThe Folk Songs of North Americaand Vance Randolph'sOzark Folksongs, this volume will appeal to general audiences, folklorists, ethnomusicologists, preservationists, traditional musicians, and historians.
Flap Copy
Alabama is a state rich in folksong tradition, from old English ballads sung along the Tennessee River to children's game songs played in Mobile, from the rhythmic work songs of the railroad gandy dancers of Gadsden to the spirituals of the Black Belt. The musical heritage of blacks and whites, rich and poor, hill folk and cotton farmers, these songs endure as a living part of the state's varied past. In the mid 1940s Byron Arnold, an eager young music professor from The University of Alabama, set out to find and record as many of these songs as he could and was rewarded by unstinting cooperation from many informants. Mrs. Julia Greer Marechal of Mobile, for example, was 90 years old, blind, and a semi-invalid, but she sang for Arnold for three hours, allowing the recording of 33 songs and exhausting Arnold and his technician. Helped by such living repositories as Mrs. Marechal, the Arnold collection grew to well over 500 songs, augmented by field notes and remarkable biographical information on the singers. More than 200 significant songs-lullabies, Civil War anthems, African-American gospel and secular songs, fiddle tunes, temperance songs, love ballads, play-party rhymes, and work songs. In the tradition of Alan Lomax's The Folk Songs of North America and Vance Randolph's Ozark Folksongs, this volume will appeal to general audiences, folklorists, ethnomusicologists, preservationists, traditional musicians, and historians.
Flap Copy
Alabama is a state rich in folksong tradition, from old English ballads sung along the Tennessee River to children's game songs played in Mobile, from the rhythmic work songs of the railroad gandy dancers of Gadsden to the spirituals of the Black Belt. The musical heritage of blacks and whites, rich and poor, hill folk and cotton farmers, these songs endure as a living part of the state's varied past. In the mid 1940s Byron Arnold, an eager young music professor from The University of Alabama, set out to find and record as many of these songs as he could and was rewarded by unstinting cooperation from many informants. Mrs. Julia Greer Marechal of Mobile, for example, was 90 years old, blind, and a semi-invalid, but she sang for Arnold for three hours, allowing the recording of 33 songs and exhausting Arnold and his technician. Helped by such living repositories as Mrs. Marechal, the Arnold collection grew to well over 500 songs, augmented by field notes and remarkable biographical information on the singers. More than 200 significant songs-lullabies, Civil War anthems, African-American gospel and secular songs, fiddle tunes, temperance songs, love ballads, play-party rhymes, and work songs. In the tradition of Alan Lomax's The Folk Songs of North America and Vance Randolph's Ozark Folksongs , this volume will appeal to general audiences, folklorists, ethnomusicologists, preservationists, traditional musicians, and historians.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A bountiful collection of Alabama folksongs of many types from the white and black traditions. . . . This book will provide the general reader with many interesting songs to be enjoyed and resung, along with some insights into folksong and folk-singing; the general and more specialized reader will be interested in the background on Arnold's work and in some of the more unusual songs included in the collection."--Art Rosenbaum, author ofFolk Visions and Voices: Traditional Music and Song in North Georgia
"An Alabama Songbookis a wonder--a work of fine scholarship that entertains as it instructs. One can (and does) sing along while sharing joys, hopes, and disasters of a proud people whose contribution to their region is timeless. In a monumental undertaking, Byron Arnold collected these songs; with perfect pitch as editor, Robert Halli has made them ours forever."--Harper Lee, author ofTo Kill a Mockingbird
" An Alabama Songbook is a wonder--a work of fine scholarship that entertains as it instructs. One can (and does) sing along while sharing joys, hopes, and disasters of a proud people whose contribution to their region is timeless. In a monumental undertaking, Byron Arnold collected these songs; with perfect pitch as editor, Robert Halli has made them ours forever."--Harper Lee, author of To Kill a Mockingbird
"Halli's volume is a welcome addition to the preservation of folk music." -- Gulf South Historical Review
"This is a superb work--a major contribution to folk music scholarship and to our knowledge of southern culture."--Charles Wolfe, author of A Good-Natured Riot: The Birth of the Grand Ole Opry
"This is a superb work--a major contribution to folk music scholarship and to our knowledge of southern culture."--Charles Wolfe, author ofA Good-Natured Riot: The Birth of the Grand Ole Opry
" A bountiful collection of Alabama folksongs of many types from the white and black traditions. . . . This book will provide the general reader with many interesting songs to be enjoyed and resung, along with some insights into folksong and folk-singing; the general and more specialized reader will be interested in the background on Arnold's work and in some of the more unusual songs included in the collection."--Art Rosenbaum, author of Folk Visions and Voices: Traditional Music and Song in North Georgia
"A bountiful collection of Alabama folksongs of many types from the white and black traditions. . . . This book will provide the general reader with many interesting songs to be enjoyed and resung, along with some insights into folksong and folk-singing; the general and more specialized reader will be interested in the background on Arnold's work and in some of the more unusual songs included in the collection."--Art Rosenbaum, author of Folk Visions and Voices: Traditional Music and Song in North Georgia
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
An authoritative presentation of 208 folksongs collected throughout Alabama in the 1940s. "An Alabama Songbookis a wonder--a work of fine scholarship that entertains as it instructs. One can (and does) sing along while sharing joys, hopes, and disasters of a proud people whose contribution to their region is timeless. In a monumental undertaking, Byron Arnold collected these songs; with perfect pitch as editor, Robert Halli has made them ours forever."--Harper Lee, author ofTo Kill a Mockingbird "This is a superb work--a major contribution to folk music scholarship and to our knowledge of southern culture."--Charles Wolfe, author ofA Good-Natured Riot: The Birth of the Grand Ole Opry "A bountiful collection of Alabama folksongs of many types from the white and black traditions. . . . This book will provide the general reader with many interesting songs to be enjoyed and resung, along with some insights into folksong and folk-singing; the general and more specialized reader will be interested in the background on Arnold's work and in some of the more unusual songs included in the collection."--Art Rosenbaum, author ofFolk Visions and Voices: Traditional Music and Song in North Georgia
Unpaid Annotation
Alabama is a state to rich in folk song tradition, from old English ballads sung along the Tennessee River to Children's game songs played in Mobile, from the rhythmic work songs of the railroad gandy dancers of Gadsden to the spirituals of the Black Belt. The musical heritage of blacks and whites, rich and poor, hill folk and cotton farmers, these songs endure as a living part of the state's varied past. In the mid 1940s Byron Arnold, an eager young music professor from The University of Alabama, set out to find and record as many of these songs as he could and was rewarded by unstinting cooperation from many informants. Mrs. Julia Greer Marchal of Mobile, for example, was 90 years old, blind, and a semi-invalid, but she sang for Arnold for three hours, allowing the recording of 33 songs and exhausting Arnold and his technician. Helped by such living repositories as Mrs. Marchal, the Arnold collection grew to well over 500 songs, augmented by field notes and remarkable biographical information on the singers. "An Alabama Songbook is the result of Arnold's efforts and those of his informants across the state and has been shaped by Robert W. Halli Jr. into a narrative enriched by more than 200 significant songs--lulabies, Civil War anthems, African-American gospel and secular songs, fiddle tunes, temperance songs, love ballads, play-party rhymes, and work songs. In the tradition of Alan Lomax's "The Folk Songs of North America and Vance Randolph's "Ozark Folksongs, this volume will appeal to general audiences, folklorists, ethnomusicologist, preservationist, traditional musicians, and historians.
Main Description
A lavish presentation of 208 folksongs collected throughout Alabamain the 1940s.Alabama is a state rich in folksong tradition, from old English ballads sung along the Tennessee River to children's game songs played in Mobile, from the rhythmic work songs of the railroad gandy dancers of Gadsden to the spirituals of the Black Belt. The musical heritage of blacks and whites, rich and poor, hill folk and cotton farmers, these songs endure as a living part of the state's varied past.In the mid 1940s Byron Arnold, an eager young music professor from The University of Alabama, set out to find and record as many of these songs as he could and was rewarded by unstinting cooperation from many informants. Mrs. Julia Greer Marechal of Mobile, for example, was 90 years old, blind, and a semi-invalid, but she sang for Arnold for three hours, allowing the recording of 33 songs and exhausting Arnold and his technician. Helped by such living repositories as Mrs. Marechal, the Arnold collection grew to well over 500 songs, augmented by field notes and remarkable biographical information on the singers.An Alabama Songbook is the result of Arnold's efforts and those of his informants across the state and has been shaped by Robert W. Halli Jr. into a narrative enriched by more than 200 significant songs-lullabies, Civil War anthems, African-American gospel and secular songs, fiddle tunes, temperance songs, love ballads, play-party rhymes, and work songs. In the tradition of Alan Lomax's The Folk Songs of North America and Vance Randolph's Ozark Folksongs, this volume will appeal to general audiences, folklorists, ethnomusicologists, preservationists, traditional musicians, and historians.
Main Description
A lavish presentation of 208 folksongs collected throughout Alabama in the 1940s . Alabama is a state rich in folksong tradition, from old English ballads sung along the Tennessee River to children's game songs played in Mobile, from the rhythmic work songs of the railroad gandy dancers of Gadsden to the spirituals of the Black Belt. The musical heritage of blacks and whites, rich and poor, hill folk and cotton farmers, these songs endure as a living part of the state's varied past. In the mid 1940s Byron Arnold, an eager young music professor from The University of Alabama, set out to find and record as many of these songs as he could and was rewarded by unstinting cooperation from many informants. Mrs. Julia Greer Marechal of Mobile, for example, was 90 years old, blind, and a semi-invalid, but she sang for Arnold for three hours, allowing the recording of 33 songs and exhausting Arnold and his technician. Helped by such living repositories as Mrs. Marechal, the Arnold collection grew to well over 500 songs, augmented by field notes and remarkable biographical information on the singers. An Alabama Songbook is the result of Arnold's efforts and those of his informants across the state and has been shaped by Robert W. Halli Jr. into a narrative enriched by more than 200 significant songs-lullabies, Civil War anthems, African-American gospel and secular songs, fiddle tunes, temperance songs, love ballads, play-party rhymes, and work songs. In the tradition of Alan Lomax's The Folk Songs of North America and Vance Randolph's Ozark Folksongs , this volume will appeal to general audiences, folklorists, ethnomusicologists, preservationists, traditional musicians, and historians.
Main Description
A lavish presentation of 208 folksongs collected throughout Alabama in the 1940s. Alabama is a state rich in folksong tradition, from old English ballads sung along the Tennessee River to children's game songs played in Mobile, from the rhythmic work songs of the railroad gandy dancers of Gadsden to the spirituals of the Black Belt. The musical heritage of blacks and whites, rich and poor, hill folk and cotton farmers, these songs endure as a living part of the state's varied past. In the mid 1940s Byron Arnold, an eager young music professor from The University of Alabama, set out to find and record as many of these songs as he could and was rewarded by unstinting cooperation from many informants. Mrs. Julia Greer Marechal of Mobile, for example, was 90 years old, blind, and a semi-invalid, but she sang for Arnold for three hours, allowing the recording of 33 songs and exhausting Arnold and his technician. Helped by such living repositories as Mrs. Marechal, the Arnold collection grew to well over 500 songs, augmented by field notes and remarkable biographical information on the singers. An Alabama Songbook is the result of Arnold's efforts and those of his informants across the state and has been shaped by Robert W. Halli Jr. into a narrative enriched by more than 200 significant songs-lullabies, Civil War anthems, African-American gospel and secular songs, fiddle tunes, temperance songs, love ballads, play-party rhymes, and work songs. In the tradition of Alan Lomax's The Folk Songs of North America and Vance Randolph's Ozark Folksongs , this volume will appeal to general audiences, folklorists, ethnomusicologists, preservationists, traditional musicians, and historians.
Back Cover Copy
An authoritative presentation of 208 folksongs collected throughout Alabama in the 1940s. "An Alabama Songbook is a wonder--a work of fine scholarship that entertains as it instructs. One can (and does) sing along while sharing joys, hopes, and disasters of a proud people whose contribution to their region is timeless. In a monumental undertaking, Byron Arnold collected these songs; with perfect pitch as editor, Robert Halli has made them ours forever."--Harper Lee, author of To Kill a Mockingbird "This is a superb work--a major contribution to folk music scholarship and to our knowledge of southern culture."--Charles Wolfe, author of A Good-Natured Riot: The Birth of the Grand Ole Opry "A bountiful collection of Alabama folksongs of many types from the white and black traditions. . . . This book will provide the general reader with many interesting songs to be enjoyed and resung, along with some insights into folksong and folk-singing; the general and more specialized reader will be interested in the background on Arnold's work and in some of the more unusual songs included in the collection."--Art Rosenbaum, author of Folk Visions and Voices: Traditional Music and Song in North Georgia
Back Cover Copy
An authoritative presentation of 208 folksongs collected throughout Alabama in the 1940s. " An Alabama Songbook is a wonder--a work of fine scholarship that entertains as it instructs. One can (and does) sing along while sharing joys, hopes, and disasters of a proud people whose contribution to their region is timeless. In a monumental undertaking, Byron Arnold collected these songs; with perfect pitch as editor, Robert Halli has made them ours forever."--Harper Lee, author of To Kill a Mockingbird "This is a superb work--a major contribution to folk music scholarship and to our knowledge of southern culture."--Charles Wolfe, author of A Good-Natured Riot: The Birth of the Grand Ole Opry " A bountiful collection of Alabama folksongs of many types from the white and black traditions. . . . This book will provide the general reader with many interesting songs to be enjoyed and resung, along with some insights into folksong and folk-singing; the general and more specialized reader will be interested in the background on Arnold's work and in some of the more unusual songs included in the collection."--Art Rosenbaum, author of Folk Visions and Voices: Traditional Music and Song in North Georgia
Table of Contents
Introductionp. XV
Ballads
Love's Triumphs
The Miller's Daughter (Child 95)p. 3
Pretty Mohea (Laws H 8)p. 5
Katie Dear (Laws M 4)p. 6
Last Night I Dreamed of My True Love (Laws M 13)p. 7
Jack the Sailor (Laws N 7)p. 9
Oh Johnny (Laws O 33)p. 11
A Fair Damsel (Laws N 42)p. 13
Love's Tragedies
Billy Came Over the Main White Ocean (Child 4)p. 15
Love Henry (Child 68)p. 18
The Brown Girl (Child 73)p. 19
Barbara Allen (Child 84)p. 22
Rosella (Laws F 1)p. 26
True Lovers Part (Law G 21)p. 27
Johnson City (Laws P 24)p. 29
Love's Disappointments
Lord Lovel (Child 75)p. 31
Sailor Shantey (Laws K 12)p. 33
Fair Lady Bright (Law M 3)p. 34
Winter's Nightp. 35
The Rich Irish Lady (Laws P 9)p. 37
Robin Grayp. 38
Logan O. Buckenp. 40
Joe Bowers (Laws B 14)p. 41
Jack and Joep. 42
That Little Black Mustachep. 44
Pathos/Children
It Rained, It Mist (Child 155)p. 47
Three Babes (Child 79)p. 49
When the Parley Dew Is Fadedp. 51
The Orphan Girlp. 52
Put My Little Shoes Awayp. 54
The Blind Child's Prayerp. 55
Tying the Leavesp. 57
Pathos/Adults
The Romish Lady (Laws Q 32)p. 59
The Letter Edged in Blackp. 60
Darling, Soon I Will Be Sleepingp. 61
Little Dovep. 62
Drunkard's Songp. 64
Ragged Patp. 66
Crimes and Criminals
Charles Guiteau (Law E 11)p. 68
Little Mary Phagan (Laws F 20)p. 69
Stagalee (Laws I 15)p. 71
Boston City (Laws L 16B)p. 73
Humor
The Blue-Tail Fly (Laws I 19)p. 76
Springfield Mountain/Rattle-um Snake (Laws G 16)p. 77
Billy Grimesp. 79
Squire Jones's Daughterp. 80
The Old Man Lived in the West (Child 277)p. 82
Father Grumble (Laws Q1)p. 84
The Frog He Would A-Courting Ridep. 86
The Foxp. 90
The Clerks of Parch's Covep. 91
The Wedding of Bean Rock Hollowp. 93
Folksongs
The Civil War and After
Old Abe's Electedp. 97
In the Year '61p. 98
The Year of Jubilop. 99
Before This War Broke Outp. 100
The Soldier's Farep. 101
My Southern Homep. 103
Tombigbee Riverp. 104
Dixiep. 105
Rosaleep. 106
I'm Gwine from the Cotton Fieldsp. 107
Come, My Love, Comep. 108
Blues
Another Man Done Gonep. 109
Chain Gang Songp. 110
Deep Blue Seap. 111
Railroad Work Songs
Lining Trackp. 112
Laying Railsp. 114
Tamping Tiesp. 116
Picking and Gradingp. 117
Serious Songs of Love
Old Smokyp. 118
Long Ways from Homep. 119
A-Walking, A-Talkingp. 120
Pretty Molliep. 123
Berthap. 124
Lonesome Dovep. 125
Courting
Paper of Pinsp. 126
I'll Have No Drunkard to Pleasep. 128
Courting Songp. 130
La La Trudump. 131
Teddy O'Husseyp. 132
Old Shiboots and Legginsp. 133
Marital Relations
Niggljy Naggljyp. 136
I Wish I Was Single Againp. 137
I Wish I Were a Single Girl Againp. 138
I'm Satisfiedp. 139
All for the Menp. 140
Risque Characters
Rosen the Beaup. 142
Till I Diep. 143
No! No! No!p. 144
Negro Demimonde Songp. 145
Hesitatin' Whiskeyp. 145
Humor
The Smeller Songp. 146
Jolly Neighborp. 147
Fifty Centsp. 148
Hard Timesp. 150
The Watermelon Songp. 151
Work Songp. 152
Melissap. 153
Bible Talesp. 154
Frolic Tunes
Boil Them Cabbage Downp. 156
Cindyp. 158
Melindap. 160
Buckeye Rabbitp. 161
Walk Tom Walkerp. 162
Lank Dankp. 163
Carve Dat Possump. 164
Run, Nigger, Runp. 165
The Jaybird Songp. 166
We Whooped and We Holleredp. 168
Children Choosing Partners
Hog Droversp. 170
Little Gentleman from the Springp. 171
Here Comes Someone A-Rovingp. 172
Come Over the Heatherp. 173
Acorns Grow on White Oak Treesp. 174
Bower of Rosesp. 175
Children Playing Games
Green Gravelp. 176
My Pigeon Housep. 177
Riggety Jigp. 177
The Old Gray Catp. 178
Like a Leaf or Featherp. 179
Little Sally Walkerp. 179
Smoke Goes up the Chimneyp. 180
Answering-Back Songs
The Little White Daisiesp. 181
Old Pompeyp. 182
Miss Jennie O. Jonesp. 183
Jenny Janep. 186
Feed the Animalsp. 187
Mr. Carpenterp. 188
Songs Appealing to Children
Mister Tick-Tockp. 190
Bullfrog Jumpedp. 190
The Black Catp. 191
Dance to Your Daddyp. 192
Bobby Bumblep. 192
Short'nin' Breadp. 193
Nonsense Songs, Rocking Songs, and Lullabies
Here We Go Upp. 194
Oh My Little Boyp. 195
Rod A Rinc-tump. 195
Little Lapdogp. 196
My Mama's Sweet Baby Boyp. 197
Alabama Coonp. 198
Bonesp. 199
Come, Butter, Comep. 199
Raccoon and Possump. 200
Ride Awayp. 200
Go to Sleepyp. 201
Spirituals
Worldly Woe
Ah, Job, Jobp. 205
In-a My Heartp. 207
Two Wingsp. 208
Lord, I Want Two Wingsp. 209
Workin' on the Buildin'p. 210
Noryp. 211
The Old Ark's Er-Movin'p. 212
Scandalizin' My Namep. 213
Low Is the Wayp. 213
No Mo' Weepin' and Wailin'p. 214
Jesus Walked This Lonesome Valleyp. 215
Tell All the World, Johnp. 216
If You Don't Want to Get in Troublep. 217
Sinner, Don't Let This Harvest Passp. 218
Songs of Forgiveness
You Got to Clear the Linep. 219
All My Sins Been Taken Awayp. 220
I Believe I'll Go Back Homep. 223
The Love of Jesus
I Met Jesus in the Valleyp. 224
He Knowsp. 225
It's Jesus That Keeps Me Alivep. 227
Let's Go Down to the Waterp. 228
I Got a Bookp. 229
Roun' the Wallp. 230
Drinkin' Winep. 231
I Heard the Angels Singingp. 232
The Love Come Twinkling Downp. 233
On Your Bondp. 234
I'm So Gladp. 235
Honey in the Rockp. 236
Passing
Jesus Goin' to Make Up My Dyin'Bedp. 237
Oh Death Is Awfulp. 239
Bring God's Servant Homep. 240
There's a Man Goin''Round Takin' Namesp. 241
If Dyin' Was Allp. 242
Tall Angel at the Barp. 243
Going to Heaven
I Hear the Train A-Comin'p. 245
Satan's a Liarp. 247
Room Enoughp. 248
Plenty Good Roomp. 249
We Gonna Have a Good Timep. 250
Wonder Where Is Good Ol' Danielp. 251
I'm On My Wayp. 252
Beulah's Landp. 253
I Am Going Homep. 254
Settin' Downp. 254
Don't Call the Rollp. 255
Wonderful Cityp. 256
The Apocalypse
Ezekiel Saw a Wheelp. 257
Go Chain the Lion Downp. 258
Midnight Cryp. 258
Indian Songp. 259
Run to the Rockp. 260
One of These Daysp. 261
Jubilation
Oh Mary Don't You Weepp. 263
Wildernessp. 265
Free at Lastp. 266
John Done Saw That Numberp. 267
Good Newsp. 268
All God's Chillun Got Shoesp. 269
I'll Be Waiting Up Therep. 270
Hallelujah Amenp. 271
Informant Biographies from Folksongs of Alabamap. 273
Selected Song Referencesp. 283
Works Citedp. 289
Index of Namesp. 291
Index of Song Titles and First Linesp. 295
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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