Catalogue


America's colony : the political and cultural conflict between the United States and Puerto Rico /
Pedro A. Malavet.
imprint
New York : New York University Press, c2004.
description
xiii, 242 p.
ISBN
0814756808 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
New York : New York University Press, c2004.
isbn
0814756808 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction : why I am here -- Race, culture, colonialism, citizenships and Latina/o critical race theory -- The legal relationship between Puerto Rico and the Estados Unidos de Norteamérica (U.S.A.) -- No importa el tirano te trate con negra maldad : Puerto Rican political culture -- La tierra de Borinquen : Puerto Rican cultural nationhood -- Que será de Borinquen? : theorizing a new reality of citizenship and nation -- A framework for legal reform -- Conclusion : este son que traigo yo.
catalogue key
5251689
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Pedro A. Malavet is Professor at the University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-02-01:
Malavet presents a lawyerly examination of the legal and political status of the island of Puerto Rico, viewed as a colony of the US. The subtitle--the political and cultural conflict between the United States and Puerto Rico--is less evident in the text than in the title. Much (most) of the book concerns the development of the legal and constitutional relationship between the island and the mainland. As such, it provides a new and needed approach to understanding the development and current status of Puerto Rico. Unfortunately, the legalistic style provides a relatively arid approach to the long history of this relationship in both a cultural and political sense. The book has no bibliography and extensive footnotes do not contain references to older (but more interesting) works on the topic. Other sources on the subject include Francisco Rivera-Batiz's Island Paradox: Puerto Rico in the 1990s (CH, Jul'97) and Kelvin Santiago-Valles's "Subject People" and Colonial Discourses (CH, Sep'94). Finally, no book on Puerto Rico should be written without reference to Gordon K. Lewis's Puerto Rico: Freedom and Power in the Caribbean (1963). ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Researchers, faculty, and professionals. E. A. Duff emeritus, Randolph-Macon Woman's College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A brilliant intervention in the culture and politics of Latinos in the United States. Important, timely, and innovative, Boricua Pop is a stellar addition to a body of work that grows in importance over time. Negr--n-Muntaner's book is eagerly anticipated." -José Quiroga,author of Tropics of Desire
"America's Colony incisively analyzes the legal treatment of Puerto Rico as a U.S. territory and the second class treatment of Puerto Ricans. This important book is sure to become an influential critical analysis of the subordination of Puerto Ricans, who contrary to popular opinion are U.S. citizens by birth. Denied representation in the U.S. Congress and the right to vote for President, it is no surprise that Puerto Ricans on the island are denied the education, public benefits, and basic rights that other U.S. citizens enjoy. Importantly, America's Colony traces the legal justification for such treatment, including the amazing U.S. Supreme Court cases from the early twentieth century decisions that have remained law to this day that the U.S. Constitution simply does not fully apply to the territory of Puerto Rico. For anyone interested in one of the last American colonies, and modern Puerto Rico, including the controversy over bomb testing on the Puerto Rican island of Vieques, Malavet's book is essential reading."
"A perspicacious new book and one of the most intellectually exciting works of recent years, Boricua Pop: Puerto Ricans and the latinization of American Culture gives new meaning to the idea of the pleasure of the text. - QBR
"Frances Negr--n-Muntaner is a challenging and provocative scholar whose multi-focal positionings turn the Puerto Rican process of colonization and migration into a fascinating transcultural hologram. Boricua Pop is a foundational text in American, Latino/a, Queer, Performance, and Cultural Studies." -Alberto Sandoval-Sánchez,Mount Holyoke College
"In an era increasingly concerned with democracy around the world, Malavet reminds us of the forgotten colony in our own backyard -- Puerto Rico. Utilizing a Critical Race/Latino Theory perspective, Malavet make the legal case for a post-colonial future in which reparations will be owed."
( "In an era increasingly concerned with democracy around the world, Malavet reminds us of the forgotten colony in our own backyard -- Puerto Rico. Utilizing a Critical Race/Latino Theory perspective, Malavet make the legal case for a post-colonial future in which reparations will be owed." )-(Adrien K. Wing),(University of Iowa College of Law )
"Mixing the down and dirty with high culture to come up with good look at the transculture effects of it all." - San Juan Star
"Provides a new and needed approach to understanding the development and current status of Puerto Rico."
( "Provides a new and needed approach to understanding the development and current status of Puerto Rico." )-( Choice ),()
"Provocative and broad-ranging . . . This eclectic, always interesting work will be certain to elicit discussion among faculty and students of ethnic studies, US popular culture, and Puerto Rican and Latino studies." - Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2005
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Puerto Rico has remained a territory of the United States since 1898, its people having neither full U.S. or separate Puerto Rican nationality. This book explores the complex relationship between the U.S. & its Caribbean colony, & evaluates options for the future status of the island.
Main Description
Boricua Pop is the first book solely devoted to Puerto Rican visibility, cultural impact, and identity formation in the U.S. and at home. Frances Negron-Muntaner explores everything from the beloved American musical West Side Story to the phenomenon of singer/actress/ fashion designer Jennifer Lopez, from the faux historical chronicle Seva to the creation of Puerto Rican Barbie, from novelist Rosario Ferre to performer Holly Woodlawn, and from painter provocateur Andy Warhol to the seemingly overnight success story of Ricky Martin. Negron-Muntaner traces some of the many possible itineraries of exchange between American and Puerto Rican cultures, including the commodification of Puerto Rican cultural practices such as voguing, graffiti, and the Latinization of pop music. Drawing from literature, film, painting, and popular culture, and including both the normative and the odd, the canonized authors and the misfits, the island and its diaspora, Boricua Pop is a fascinating blend of low life and high culture: a highly original, challenging, and lucid new work by one of our most talented cultural critics.
Main Description
Provides a new and needed approach to understanding the development and current status of Puerto Rico.-CHOICEThe precise legal nature of the relationship between the United States and the people of Puerto Rico was not explicitly determined in 1898 when the Treaty of Paris transferred sovereignty over Puerto Rico from Spain to the United States. Since then, many court cases, beginning in 1901, have been instrumental in defining this delicate relationship.While the legislation has clearly established the non-existence of Puerto Rican nationhood and lack of independent Puerto Rican citizenship, the debate over Puerto Rico's status continues to this day.Malavet offers a critique of Puerto Rico's current status as well as of its treatment by the U.S. legal and political systems. Puerto Rico is a colony of the United States, and Puerto Ricans living on this geographically separate island are subject to the United States's legal and political authority. They are the largest group of U.S. citizens currently living under territorial status. Malavet argues that the Puerto Rican cultural nation experiences U.S. imperialism, which compromises both the island's sovereignty and Puerto Ricans' citizenship rights. He analyzes the three alternatives to Puerto Rico's continued territorial status, examining the challenges manifest in each possibility, as well as illuminating what he believes to be the best course of action.
Main Description
The precise legal nature of the relationship between the United States and the people of Puerto Rico was not explicitly determined in 1898 when the Treaty of Paris transferred sovereignty over Puerto Rico from Spain to the United States. Since then, many court cases, beginning in 1901, have been instrumental in defining this delicate relationship. While the legislation has clearly established the nonexistence of Puerto Rican nationhood and lack of independent Puerto Rican citizenship, the debate over Puerto Rico's status continues to this day. Malavet offers a critique of Puerto Rico's current status as well as of its treatment by the U.S. legal and political systems. Puerto Rico is a colony of the United States, and Puerto Ricans living on this geographically separate island are subject to the United States's legal and political authority. They are the largest group of U.S. citizens currently living under territorial status. Malavet argues that the Puerto Rican cultural nation experiences U.S. imperialism, which compromises both the island's sovereignty and Puerto Ricans' citizenship rights. He analyzes the three alternatives to Puerto Rico's continued territorial status, examining the challenges manifest in each possibility, as well as illuminating what he believes to be the best course of action.
Main Description
The precise legal nature of the relationship between the United States and the people of Puerto Rico was not explicitly determined in 1898 when the Treaty of Paris transferred sovereignty over Puerto Rico from Spain to the United States. Since then, many court cases, beginning in 1901, have been instrumental in defining this delicate relationship.While the legislation has clearly established the nonexistence of Puerto Rican nationhood and lack of independent Puerto Rican citizenship, the debate over Puerto Rico's status continues to this day.Malavet offers a critique of Puerto Rico's current status as well as of its treatment by the U.S. legal and political systems. Puerto Rico is a colony of the United States, and Puerto Ricans living on this geographically separate island are subject to the United States's legal and political authority. They are the largest group of U.S. citizens currently living under territorial status. Malavet argues that the Puerto Rican cultural nation experiences U.S. imperialism, which compromises both the island's sovereignty and Puerto Ricans' citizenship rights. He analyzes the three alternatives to Puerto Rico's continued territorial status, examining the challenges manifest in each possibility, as well as illuminating what he believes to be the best course of action.
Unpaid Annotation
"Provides a new and needed approach to understanding the development and current status of Puerto Rico."-CHOICEThe precise legal nature of the relationship between the United States and the people of Puerto Rico was not explicitly determined in 1898 when the Treaty of Paris transferred sovereignty over Puerto Rico from Spain to the United States. Since then, many court cases, beginning in 1901, have been instrumental in defining this delicate relationship. While the legislation has clearly established the non-existence of Puerto Rican nationhood and lack of independent Puerto Rican citizenship, the debate over Puerto Rico's status continues to this day. Malavet offers a critique of Puerto Rico's current status as well as of its treatment by the U.S. legal and political systems. Puerto Rico is a colony of the United States, and Puerto Ricans living on this geographically separate island are subject to the United States's legal and political authority. They are the largest group of U.S. citizens currently living under territorial status. Malavet argues that the Puerto Rican cultural nation experiences U.S. imperialism, which compromises both the island's sovereignty and Puerto Ricans' citizenship rights. He analyzes the three alternatives to Puerto Rico's continued territorial status, examining the challenges manifest in each possibility, as well as illuminating what he believes to be the best course of action.
Unpaid Annotation
The precise legal nature of the relationship between the United States and the people of Puerto Rico was not explicitly determined in 1898 when the Treaty of Paris transferred sovereignty over Puerto Rico from Spain to the United States. Since then, many court cases, beginning in 1901, have been instrumental in defining this delicate relationship. While the legislation has clearly established the non-existence of Puerto Rican nationhood and lack of independent Puerto Rican citizenship, the debate over Puerto Rico's status continues to this day. Malavet offers a critique of Puerto Rico's current status as well as of its treatment by the U.S. legal and political systems. Puerto Rico is a colony of the United States, and Puerto Ricans living on this geographically separate island are subject to the United States's legal and political authority. They are the largest group of U.S. citizens currently living under territorial status. Malavet argues that the Puerto Rican cultural nation experiences U.S. imperialism, which compromises both the island's sovereignty and Puerto Ricans' citizenship rights. He analyzes the three alternatives to Puerto Rico's continued territorial status, examining the challenges manifest in each possibility, as well as illuminating what he believes to be the best course of action.
Table of Contents
Gracias (Thanks)p. xi
Introduction: Why I Am Herep. 1
Race, Culture, Colonialism, Citizenships, and Latina/o Critical Race Theoryp. 15
The Legal Relationship between Puerto Rico and the Estados Unidos de Norteamerica (United States of America)p. 28
Puerto Rican Political Culturep. 49
Puerto Rican Cultural Nationhoodp. 100
Theorizing a New Reality of Citizenship and Nationp. 117
A Framework for Legal Reformp. 132
Conclusionp. 147
Notesp. 163
Indexp. 223
About the Authorp. 242
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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