Catalogue


Łódź Ghetto album : photographs /
by Henryk Ross ; selected by Martin Parr & Timothy Prus ; foreword by Robert Jan van Pelt ; text by Thomas Weber.
imprint
London : Boot, 2004.
description
157 p. : ill., map ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0954281373
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
London : Boot, 2004.
isbn
0954281373
catalogue key
5250240
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 157).
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Henryk Ross was born in Warsaw, Poland, in 1910, becoming a sports and general press photographer in Lodz before World War II. As a Jew, he was incarcerated in the Lodz ghetto by the Germans where he became one of two official photographers, producing identity and propaganda photographs for its Department of Statistics. His duties afforded him access to film and processing facilities and he used these to create a record of the ghetto, risking his life to secretly document the deportations, hangings and other atrocities. As the Germans began the liquidation of the ghetto in 1944, he buried his archive of 3,000 negatives and other ghetto records for safekeeping. Surviving the Holocaust (as a member of the ghetto clean-up squad intact at the time the Red Army liberated Lodz), he was able to recover the archive after the war. From his post-war home in Israel, where he worked as a photographer and zincographer, he circulated images showing the horrors of Lodz, including in his 1960s book The Last Journey of the Jews of Lodz and at the trial of the Holocaust-mastermind, Adolf Eichmann. He catalogued his photographs in 1987. Ross died in Israel in 1991.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is a collection of historically compelling, previously unseen photographs of life in the Lodz Ghetto in Nazi-occupied Poland.
Main Description
Born in 1913, Henryk Ross was a press photographer in Poland before World War II. As a Jew, he was incarcerated by the invading Germans in the Lodz Ghetto (Poland's largest ghetto after Warsaw) where he became one of two official photographers, producing identity and propaganda photographs for its Department of Statistics. His duties afforded him access to film and processing facilities, and he used these to create a unique record of ghetto life, secretly photographing the atrocities of Lodz and making family and group portraits of (and presumably for) the ghetto elite. As the Germans began the liquidation of Lodz in 1944, he buried his archive of 3,000 negatives. Surviving the Holocaust, he was able to recover them after the war. From his post-war home in Israel, he circulated images showing the horrors of Lodz, including these in his own books and as testimony in the trial of Adolf Eichmann. However, Ross apparently took no further interest in the domestic photographs, which have remained unprinted until today. In 1997, after Ross's death, his son sold the archive to a private collection in London and only now has the breadth of Ross's record of ghetto life been freshly examined for the first time. For an audience accustomed to seeing dramatic photographs of suffering in the Polish ghettos, the quiet, domestic scenes he recorded are a revealing and poignant surprise, and an important addition to the historical record. Edited by Martin Parr, the book's foreword is by highly respected Holocaust historian and expert Robert-Jan Van Pelt.
Long Description
Henryk Ross (1910-91) was a Jewish press photographer in Poland before World War II. Incarcerated by the invading Germans in the Lodz ghetto, he became one of its two official photographers. His duties afforded him access to photographic facilities which he used to secretly photograph the atrocities of Lodz, while also recording scenes of domestic life among the ghetto "elite." As the Germans began the liquidation of Lodz in 1944, Ross buried his 3,000 negatives. Surviving the Holocaust, he recovered them and, from his postwar home in Israel, circulated images showing the horrors of Lodz. But until now, the bulk of his photographs have remained unseen, including many of the ghetto police. For an audience accustomed to dramatic photographs of Holocaust suffering, the quiet, domestic scenes he recorded are poignant and sometimes shocking, challenging us to rethink what we understand about ghetto society. With a foreword by bestselling Holocaust expert Robert-Jan van Pelt, and with an appendix of original documents, this volume is introduced with an informative, illustrated essay by historian Thomas Weber. Published in association with the Archive of Modern Conflict.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. 06
Introductionp. 08
The Photographsp. 26
Publicp. 28
Privatep. 94
Chronology of the Lodz Ghettop. 146
'Give Me Your Children', Chaim Rumkowski speechp. 148
Trial of Adolf Eichmann, Henryk Ross's testimonyp. 150
Bibliographyp. 157
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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