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A Catholic in the White House? : religion, politics, and John F. Kennedy's presidential campaign /
Thomas J.Carty.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2004.
description
viii, 215 p. : ill., ports. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
1403962529 (hc : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2004.
isbn
1403962529 (hc : alk. paper)
catalogue key
5248660
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [199]-210) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"Superbly researched and very timely. Thomas Carty offers a fresh and useful vantage point for analysis of the endlessly interesting 1960 presidential campaign."--John McGreevy, Professor of History, University of Notre Dame, author of Catholicism and American Freedom: A History "Thomas Carty's treatment of John F. Kennedy's Catholicism and how it influenced the outcome of the 1960 campaign is the most influential since Theodore H. White's classic book, The Making of the President, 1960. A timely and important work."--John Kenneth White, Professor of Politics, The Catholic University of America "It is an axiom that 'the Catholic issue' embroiled the 1960 campaign, but this book is the first to take us beyond folklore to scholarship. Scrupulously argued and widely researched, A Catholic in the White House? examines the varieties of anti-Catholic concerns and phobias in 1960 and their impact. It captures the flavor of that riveting campaign and shrewdly analyzes the role of Catholicism in national politics both before and since 1960."--Richard M. Fried, University of Illinois at Chicago "Religion, and Catholicism in particular, informs U.S. political life in subtle ways that often escape notice. In an engaging demonstration of this dynamic, Thomas Carty skillfully explores the multiple contexts and players that shaped John F. Kennedy's successful bid for the nation's highest office, from the role of Catholic anti-communism during the Cold war, to Kennedy's complex relationships with Protestants and liberals. A Catholic in the White House? will be required reading for those who wish to understand the importance of 'the Catholic issue' in American presidential politics, from the candidacy of Al Smith in 1928 to that of John Kerry in 2004."--R. Scott Appleby, Professor of History, University of Notre Dame "Thomas Carty's A Catholic in the White House? is the first comprehensive scholarly examination of the 'Catholic issue' in the 1960 election. Carty provides a rich historical context, then explores the role of evangelical and mainstream Protestants, political liberals, and Catholics as they confronted the Kennedy candidacy and campaign. His treatment of the campaign includes original in-depth examination of the vote in key states. This is an important, timely book which deserves attention from everyone interested in American politics."--David J. O'Brien, Loyola Professor of Roman Catholic Studies, College of the Holy Cross
Flap Copy
"Superbly researched and very timely. Thomas Carty offers a fresh and useful vantage point for analysis of the endlessly interesting 1960 presidential campaign."--John McGreevy, Professor of History, University of Notre Dame, author ofCatholicism and American Freedom: A History "Thomas Carty's treatment of John F. Kennedy's Catholicism and how it influenced the outcome of the 1960 campaign is the most influential since Theodore H. White's classic book,The Making of the President, 1960.A timely and important work."--John Kenneth White, Professor of Politics, The Catholic University of America "It is an axiom that 'the Catholic issue' embroiled the 1960 campaign, but this book is the first to take us beyond folklore to scholarship. Scrupulously argued and widely researched,A Catholic in the White House'examines the varieties of anti-Catholic concerns and phobias in 1960 and their impact. It captures the flavor of that riveting campaign and shrewdly analyzes the role of Catholicism in national politics both before and since 1960."--Richard M. Fried, University of Illinois at Chicago "Religion, and Catholicism in particular, informs U.S. political life in subtle ways that often escape notice. In an engaging demonstration of this dynamic, Thomas Carty skillfully explores the multiple contexts and players that shaped John F. Kennedy's successful bid for the nation's highest office, from the role of Catholic anti-communism during the Cold war, to Kennedy's complex relationships with Protestants and liberals.A Catholic in the White House? will be required reading for those who wish to understand the importance of 'the Catholic issue' in American presidential politics, from the candidacy of Al Smith in 1928 to that of John Kerry in 2004."--R. Scott Appleby, Professor of History, University of Notre Dame "Thomas Carty'sA Catholic in the White House'is the first comprehensive scholarly examination of the 'Catholic issue' in the 1960 election. Carty provides a rich historical context, then explores the role of evangelical and mainstream Protestants, political liberals, and Catholics as they confronted the Kennedy candidacy and campaign. His treatment of the campaign includes original in-depth examination of the vote in key states. This is an important, timely book which deserves attention from everyone interested in American politics."--David J. O'Brien, Loyola Professor of Roman Catholic Studies, College of the Holy Cross
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-05-01:
Carty (Springfield College) challenges the conventional wisdom that JFK's election marked a major political turning point for US Catholics. Indeed, since 1960 only one Catholic (John F. Kerry) has been nominated for president by a major party. In this very engagingly written and meticulous work of scholarship, Carty examines and analyzes the past anti-Catholicism that loomed significant in the 1960 campaign and the status of Catholic politicians in the US since then. His book covers in detail such topics as how the "Catholic issue" played in major media in 1960, the importance of religion to campaign strategies that year, and how prominent evangelical leaders and also voters in key selected states reacted to JFK's Catholicism. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. General readers and students and scholars interested in the intersection of religion and politics, especially those studying Catholics and US politics. All levels. M. J. Rozell George Mason University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Superbly researched and very timely. Thomas Carty offers a fresh and useful vantage point for analysis of the endlessly interesting 1960 presidential campaign."--John McGreevy, Professor of History, University of Notre Dame, author of Catholicism and American Freedom: A History "Thomas Carty's treatment of John F. Kennedy's Catholicism and how it influenced the outcome of the 1960 campaign is the most influential since Theodore H. White's classic book, The Making of the President, 1960. A timely and important work."--John Kenneth White, Professor of Politics, The Catholic University of America "It is an axiom that 'the Catholic issue' embroiled the 1960 campaign, but this book is the first to take us beyond folklore to scholarship. Scrupulously argued and widely researched, A Catholic in the White House? examines the varieties of anti-Catholic concerns and phobias in 1960 and their impact. It captures the flavor of that riveting campaign and shrewdly analyzes the role of Catholicism in national politics both before and since 1960."--Richard M. Fried, University of Illinois at Chicago "Religion, and Catholicism in particular, informs U.S. political life in subtle ways that often escape notice. In an engaging demonstration of this dynamic, Thomas Carty skillfully explores the multiple contexts and players that shaped John F. Kennedy's successful bid for the nation's highest office, from the role of Catholic anti-communism during the Cold War, to Kennedy's complex relationships with Protestants and liberals. A Catholic in the White House ? will be required reading for those who wish to understand the importance of 'the Catholic issue' in American presidential politics, from the candidacy of Al Smith in 1928 to that of John Kerry in 2004."--R. Scott Appleby, Professor of History, University of Notre Dame "Thomas Carty's A Catholic in the White House? is the first comprehensive scholarly examination of the 'Catholic issue' in the 1960 election. Carty provides a rich historical context, then explores the role of evangelical and mainstream Protestants, political liberals, and Catholics as they confronted the Kennedy candidacy and campaign. His treatment of the campaign includes original in-depth examination of the vote in key states. This is an important, timely book which deserves attention from everyone interested in American politics."--David J. O'Brien, Loyola Professor of Roman Catholic Studies, College of the Holy Cross
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2005
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
If John F. Kennedy's victory in the 1960 US presidential election was a turning point for Catholics in American politics, then why has no non-Protestant held the key to the White House since then? This text challenges that assumption that America has become an all-inclusive nation.
Main Description
According to numerous scholars and pundits, JFK's victory in 1960 symbolized America's evolution from a politically Protestant nation to a pluralistic one. The anti-Catholic prejudice that many blamed for presidential candidate Alfred E. Smith's crushing defeat in 1928 at last seemed to have been overcome. However, if the presidential election of 1960 was indeed a turning point for American Catholics, how do we explain the failure of any Catholic--in over forty years--to repeat Kennedy's accomplishment? In this exhaustively researched study that fuses political, cultural, social, and intellectual history, Thomas Carty challenges the assumption that JFK's successful campaign for the presidency ended decades, if not centuries, of religious and political tensions between American Catholics and Protestants.
Short Annotation
According to most political and religious scholars and pundits, JFK's victory in 1960 symbolized America's evolution from a politcally Protestant nation to a pluralist religious community that at last fully incorporated Catholics into the body politic.
Table of Contents
Introduction : the unresolved "Catholic issue" : the debate about religion's role in the 1960 presidential campaignp. 1
Popish plots, religious liberty, and the emerging face of American Catholicism before 1928p. 11
Protestant America or a nation of immigrants? : Al Smith, Joe Kennedy, and Jim Farley pursue the nation's highest officep. 27
Nativist anti-Catholicism or Christian evangelization? : Billy Graham, Norman Vincent Peale, and the marginalization of religion during the 1960 presidential campaignp. 49
Religious liberty or religious test? : debating the 1960 campaign's "Catholic issue" in liberal organizations and mediap. 67
Defining religious bigotry : pluralism and political strategy in the 1960 presidential electionp. 83
The cold war and the domestic response to Kennedy's Catholicismp. 113
Testing the "Bailey thesis" : state-level reactions to a Catholic presidential candidate in California, Georgia, Michigan, and New Yorkp. 129
Epilogue : Catholics and presidential elections since 1960p. 159
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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