Catalogue


Ron Mueck /
herausgegeben von Heiner Bastian.
imprint
Ostfildern : Hatje Cantz, c2003.
description
83 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 29 cm.
ISBN
3775713379 (hd. bd.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
personal subject
More Details
author
added author
imprint
Ostfildern : Hatje Cantz, c2003.
isbn
3775713379 (hd. bd.)
contents note
Ron Mueck : Realismus neu definiert = a redefinition of realism / Susanna Greeves -- Bemerkungen über einige Skulpturen von Ron Mueck = On several sculptures by Ron Mueck / Heiner Bastian -- Catalogue raisonné / zusammengestellt von/compiled by Cëline Bastian.
general note
Catalog of exhibition at Nationalgalerie im Hamburger Bahnhof, Museum der Gegenwart, Berlin, 10 Sept. till 2 Nov. 2003.
language note
German and English.
catalogue key
5247590
A Look Inside
Summaries
Long Description
Visitors to the 2001 Venice Biennale were highly impressed with the sculpture Boy--a child who stood five meters high--by the London-based artist Ron Mueck. Harald Szeemann called the sculpture "the sphinx of the exhibition," and it soon became its landmark. The monumental, crouching figure of a youth makes a vulnerable, defensive impression and yet, its watchful eye seems to miss nothing. Mueck's human figures are always technically perfect, absolutely realistic, deliberately undersized or oversized. He first models them in clay and then takes a hollow cast which he fills with silicone or fiberglass. The finished sculptures show delicate networks of veins, fine hairs; they even seem to breathe. Their perfection is always in the service of content, however: Viewers are touched and set thinking by the emotional quality of figures like Pregnant Womanor Dead Dad--created by the artist after the death of his father. With great autonomous presence, exhibiting human features yet completely artificial, Mueck's artworks refer to fundamental questions and allow a wealth of associations.
Long Description
Visitors to the 2001 Venice Biennale were highly impressed with the sculpture Boy--a child who stood five meters high--by the London-based artist Ron Mueck. Harald Szeemann called the sculpture "the sphinx of the exhibition," and it soon became its landmark. The monumental, crouching figure of a youth makes a vulnerable, defensive impression and yet, its watchful eye seems to miss nothing. Mueck's human figures are always technically perfect, absolutely realistic, deliberately undersized or oversized. He first models them in clay and then takes a hollow cast which he fills with silicone or fiberglass. The finished sculptures show delicate networks of veins, fine hairs; they even seem to breathe. Their perfection is always in the service of content, however: Viewers are touched and set thinking by the emotional quality of figures like Pregnant Woman or Dead Dad--created by the artist after the death of his father. With great autonomous presence, exhibiting human features yet completely artificial, Mueck's artworks refer to fundamental questions and allow a wealth of associations.
Main Description
Visitors to the 2001 Venice Biennale were highly impressed with the sculpture Boy--a child who stood five meters high--by the London-based artist Ron Mueck. Harald Szeemann called the sculpture the sphinx of the exhibition, and it soon became its landmark. The monumental, crouching figure of a youth makes a vulnerable, defensive impression and yet, its watchful eye seems to miss nothing. Mueck's human figures are always technically perfect, absolutely realistic, deliberately undersized or oversized. He first models them in clay and then takes a hollow cast which he fills with silicone or fiberglass. The finished sculptures show delicate networks of veins, fine hairs; they even seem to breathe. Their perfection is always in the service of content, however: Viewers are touched and set thinking by the emotional quality of figures like Pregnant Woman or Dead Dad--created by the artist after the death of his father. With great autonomous presence, exhibiting human features yet completely artificial, Mueck's artworks refer to fundamental questions and allow a wealth of associations.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Mueck's human figures are always technically perfect, absolutely realistic, deliberately undersized or oversized. He first models them in clay and then takes a hollow cast of which he fills with silicone or fibreglass. This catalogue of his work accompanies an exhibition in Berlin in 2003.
Table of Contents
Vorwortp. 6
Forewordp. 7
Ron Mueck--Realismus neu definiertp. 9
Ron Mueck--A Redefinition of Realismp. 26
Bemerkungen uber einige Skulpturen von Ron Mueckp. 42
On Several Sculptures by Ron Mueckp. 54
Catalogue raisonnep. 67
Biografiep. 80
Biographyp. 81
Ausgewahlte Literatur / Selected Bibliography
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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