Catalogue


Alabama in the twentieth century /
Wayne Flynt.
imprint
Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, c2004.
description
xvii, 602 p.
ISBN
081731430X (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, c2004.
isbn
081731430X (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
5245312
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Wayne Flynt is Distinguished University Professor of History at Auburn University.
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Written by passionate Alabamian and accomplished historian Wayne Flynt,Alabama in the Twentieth Centuryoffers supporting arguments for both detractors and admirers of the state. A native son who has lived, loved, taught, debated, and grieved within the state for 60 of the 100 years described, the author does not flinch from pointing out Alabama's failures, such as the woeful yoke of a 1901 state constitution, the oldest one in the nation; neither is he restrained in calling attention to the state's triumphs against great odds, such as its phenomenal number of military heroes and gifted athletes, its dazzling array of writers, folk artists, and musicians, or its haunting physical beauty despite decades of abuse. Chapters are organized by topic--politics, the economy, education, African Americans, women, the military, sport, religion, literature, art, journalism--rather than chronologically, so the reader can digest the whole sweep of the century on a particular subject. Flynt's writing style is engaging, descriptive, free of clutter, yet based on sound scholarship. This book offers teachers and readers alike the vast range and complexity of Alabama's triumphs and low points in a defining century. Wayne Flyntis Distinguished University Professor of History at Auburn University and author or coauthor of 11 books, includingAlabama Baptists: Southern Baptists in the Heart of Dixie, Poor But Proud: Alabama's Poor Whites, Alabama: The History of a Deep South State,andTaking Christianity to China: Alabama Missionaries in the Middle Kingdom, 1850-1950.He has been recognized by numerous awards and honors, including the Lillian Smith Award for nonfiction, the Clarence Cason Nonfiction Award, the James F. Sulzby Jr. Book Award (twice), and the Alabama Library Association Award for nonfiction (twice).
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-06-01:
Flynt (Auburn Univ.) has written a masterful, detailed review of developments in his native state of Alabama during the past century. The book is divided into three general areas and then subdivided into specific topics that are covered for the entire century. This arrangement allows readers to follow developments in each of the subject areas for the entire period. Part 1 covers Alabama's political economy, with separate chapters on the state constitution, political developments, and economic development. Part 2 covers society, with chapters on social developments, education, women, African Americans, war experiences, and the social significance of sports. Part 3 covers culture, with chapters on religion and folk and elite cultures. The book has two great strengths that recommend it. First, the wealth of detail provides ample information with which to understand the people and events that shaped modern Alabama. Second, the information is presented with honesty, neither glossing over negative aspects nor dwelling exclusively on the positive aspects of Alabama life. Library collections in the history of Alabama or the New South will benefit from the addition of this book. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. P. Sanson Louisiana State University at Alexandria
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Wayne Flynt is a marvelous writer and story teller with exceptional powers of discernment and a good-natured ability to interpret fairly and critically. This is quite possibly the single most important book on Alabama history."--Jonathan Bass, author of Blessed Are the Peacemakers: Martin Luther King Jr., Eight White Religious Leaders, and the Letter from the Birmingham Jail
"Wayne Flynt's insight into the people of Alabama, past and present, is unmatched. Anytime I see his byline on an op-ed piece in a newspaper I read it because I know my own insight will be sharpened. He reminds me of a stern but devoted parent who doesn't hesitate to apply tough love when it's necessary. He is a historian of the first rank, but he's also a regular guy with that most uncommon of traits, namely, common sense. Alabama in the Twentieth Century will enlighten and reward anyone who reads it and reflects on its message."--Clyde Bolton, author of Nancy Swimmer, A Story of the Cherokee Nation and retired sports columnist
"Wayne Flynt's insight into the people of Alabama, past and present, is unmatched. Anytime I see his byline on an op-ed piece in a newspaper I read it because I know my own insight will be sharpened. He reminds me of a stern but devoted parent who doesn't hesitate to apply tough love when it's necessary. He is a historian of the first rank, but he's also a regular guy with that most uncommon of traits, namely, common sense. Alabama in the Twentieth Centurywill enlighten and reward anyone who reads it and reflects on its message."--Clyde Bolton, author of Nancy Swimmer, A Story of the Cherokee Nationand retired sports columnist
"Wayne Flynt's insight into the people of Alabama, past and present, is unmatched. Anytime I see his byline on an op-ed piece in a newspaper I read it because I know my own insight will be sharpened. He reminds me of a stern but devoted parent who doesn't hesitate to apply tough love when it's necessary. He is a historian of the first rank, but he's also a regular guy with that most uncommon of traits, namely, common sense.Alabama in the Twentieth Centurywill enlighten and reward anyone who reads it and reflects on its message."--Clyde Bolton, author ofNancy Swimmer, A Story of the Cherokee Nationand retired sports columnist
"Wayne Flynt is a marvelous writer and story teller with exceptional powers of discernment and a good-natured ability to interpret fairly and critically. This is quite possibly the single most important book on Alabama history."--Jonathan Bass, author ofBlessed Are the Peacemakers: Martin Luther King Jr., Eight White Religious Leaders, and the Letter from the Birmingham Jail
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2005
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Alabama is a state full of contrasts. Wayne Flynt offers supporting arguments for both detractors and admirers of the state. Chapters are organised by topic - politics, the economy, education, African Americans, women, the military, sport, religion, literature, art, journalism.
Main Description
An authoritative popular history that places the state in regional and national context.Alabama is a state full of contrasts. On the one hand, it has elected the lowest number of women to the state legislature of any state in the union; yet according to historians it produced two of the ten most important American women of the 20th century-Helen Keller and Rosa Parks. Its people are fanatically devoted to conservative religious values; yet they openly idolize tarnished football programs as the source of their heroes. Citizens who are puzzled by Alabama's maddening resistance to change or its incredibly strong sense of tradition and community will find important clues and new understanding within these pages.Written by passionate Alabamian and accomplished historian Wayne Flynt, Alabama in the Twentieth Century offers supporting arguments for both detractors and admirers of the state. A native son who has lived, loved, taught, debated, and grieved within the state for 60 of the 100 years described, the author does not flinch from pointing out Alabama's failures, such as the woeful yoke of a 1901 state constitution, the oldest one in the nation; neither is he restrained in calling attention to the state's triumphs against great odds, such as its phenomenal number of military heroes and gifted athletes, its dazzling array of writers, folk artists, and musicians, or its haunting physical beauty despite decades of abuse.Chapters are organized by topic-politics, the economy, education, African Americans, women, the military, sport, religion, literature, art, journalism-rather than chronologically, so the reader can digest the whole sweep of the century on a particular subject. Flyntu2019s writing style is engaging, descriptive, free of clutter, yet based on sound scholarship. This book offers teachers and readers alike the vast range and complexity of Alabama's triumphs and low points in a defining century.
Main Description
An authoritative popular history that places the state in regional and national context. Alabama is a state full of contrasts. On the one hand, it has elected the lowest number of women to the state legislature of any state in the union; yet according to historians it produced two of the ten most important American women of the 20th century-Helen Keller and Rosa Parks. Its people are fanatically devoted to conservative religious values; yet they openly idolize tarnished football programs as the source of their heroes. Citizens who are puzzled by Alabama's maddening resistance to change or its incredibly strong sense of tradition and community will find important clues and new understanding within these pages. Written by passionate Alabamian and accomplished historian Wayne Flynt, Alabama in the Twentieth Centuryoffers supporting arguments for both detractors and admirers of the state. A native son who has lived, loved, taught, debated, and grieved within the state for 60 of the 100 years described, the author does not flinch from pointing out Alabama's failures, such as the woeful yoke of a 1901 state constitution, the oldest one in the nation; neither is he restrained in calling attention to the state's triumphs against great odds, such as its phenomenal number of military heroes and gifted athletes, its dazzling array of writers, folk artists, and musicians, or its haunting physical beauty despite decades of abuse. Chapters are organized by topic-politics, the economy, education, African Americans, women, the military, sport, religion, literature, art, journalism-rather than chronologically, so the reader can digest the whole sweep of the century on a particular subject. Flynt’s writing style is engaging, descriptive, free of clutter, yet based on sound scholarship. This book offers teachers and readers alike the vast range and complexity of Alabama's triumphs and low points in a defining century.
Main Description
An authoritative popular history that places the state in regional and national context. Alabama is a state full of contrasts. On the one hand, it has elected the lowest number of women to the state legislature of any state in the union; yet according to historians it produced two of the ten most important American women of the 20th century-Helen Keller and Rosa Parks. Its people are fanatically devoted to conservative religious values; yet they openly idolize tarnished football programs as the source of their heroes. Citizens who are puzzled by Alabama's maddening resistance to change or its incredibly strong sense of tradition and community will find important clues and new understanding within these pages. Written by passionate Alabamian and accomplished historian Wayne Flynt, Alabama in the Twentieth Centuryoffers supporting arguments for both detractors and admirers of the state. A native son who has lived, loved, taught, debated, and grieved within the state for 60 of the 100 years described, the author does not flinch from pointing out Alabama's failures, such as the woeful yoke of a 1901 state constitution, the oldest one in the nation; neither is he restrained in calling attention to the state's triumphs against great odds, such as its phenomenal number of military heroes and gifted athletes, its dazzling array of writers, folk artists, and musicians, or its haunting physical beauty despite decades of abuse. Chapters are organized by topic-politics, the economy, education, African Americans, women, the military, sport, religion, literature, art, journalism-rather than chronologically, so the reader can digest the whole sweep of the century on a particular subject. Flynt's writing style is engaging, descriptive, free of clutter, yet based on sound scholarship. This book offers teachers and readers alike the vast range and complexity of Alabama's triumphs and low points in a defining century.
Back Cover Copy
Alabama is a state full of contrasts. On the one hand, it has elected the lowest number of women to the state legislature of any state in the union; yet according to historians it produced two of the ten most important American women of the 20th century--Helen Keller and Rosa Parks. Its people are fanatically devoted to conservative religious values; yet they openly idolize tarnished football programs as the source of their heroes. Citizens who are puzzled by Alabama's maddening resistance to change or its incredibly strong sense of tradition and community will find important clues and new understanding within these pages. "Wayne Flynt is a marvelous writer and story teller with exceptional powers of discernment and a good-natured ability to interpret fairly and critically. This is quite possibly the single most important book on Alabama history."--Jonathan Bass, author of Blessed Are the Peacemakers: Martin Luther King Jr., Eight White Religious Leaders, and the Letter from the Birmingham Jail "Wayne Flynt's insight into the people of Alabama, past and present, is unmatched. Anytime I see his byline on an op-ed piece in a newspaper I read it because I know my own insight will be sharpened. He reminds me of a stern but devoted parent who doesn't hesitate to apply tough love when it's necessary. He is a historian of the first rank, but he's also a regular guy with that most uncommon of traits, namely, common sense. Alabama in the Twentieth Century will enlighten and reward anyone who reads it and reflects on its message."--Clyde Bolton, author of Nancy Swimmer, A Story of the Cherokee Nation and retired sports columnist
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Introductionp. xv
Alabama's Political Economy
In the Beginning: The 1901 Constitutionp. 3
Every Man for Himself: Politics, Alabama Stylep. 29
Selling Alabama: The Economyp. 107
Alabama's Society
Life from the Bottom Up: Societyp. 175
Teaching the People: Educationp. 220
On and Off the Pedestal: Womenp. 251
Counting behind White Folks: African Americansp. 317
Fighting Mad: Alabamians at Warp. 373
Beyond the Game: The Social Significance of Sportsp. 407
Alabama's Culture
What Would Jesus Do? Religionp. 443
Plain and Fancy: Folk and Elite Culturep. 485
Notesp. 533
Bibliographyp. 545
Indexp. 579
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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