Catalogue


Fractured states and U.S. foreign policy : Iraq, Ethiopia, and Bosnia in the 1990's /
Evelyn Farkas.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.
description
xiii, 177 p. : maps ; 22 cm.
ISBN
1403963738
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.
isbn
1403963738
catalogue key
5237124
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [147]-164) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Evelyn Farkas taught for four years as a professor of international relations at the U.S. Marine Corps Command and Staff College, Marine Corps University. She spent five months in Bosnia as a Human Rights Officer for the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) in 1996, and as an Election Supervisor in 1997. Her writings have appeared in The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times, and elsewhere. She obtained her Masters and Ph.D. in international relations from The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, and resides in Washington, DC
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"Very few secessionist movements in the last half-century have succeeded in establishing their own internationally recognized states. In part, this is because the international community, and leading states in particular, have been reluctant to convey their material support or political recognition to such efforts. Farkas' book takes the reader inside the political decision making process of one key actor, the United States. In doing so, she confirms that some concerns are as important as expected (e.g., regional security), but also critically that other factors thought to be significant in US foreign policy making (e.g., interest groups) were peripheral at best in US decisions to support or withold support from partition proposals." -- Paul F. Diehl, Professor of Political Science, University of Illinois This timely study constitutes an outstanding contribution to the literature on ethnic conflict and contemporary U.S. foreign policy. Based on meticulous research, first-hand work in Bosnia in 1996, and focused on the ethno-religious wars that swept across Bosnia in the 1990s, as well as the 1991 conflicts in Iraq and Ethiopia, this volume provides a truly unique analysis and resource for understanding how and why states are partitioned. -- Robert L. Pfaltzgraff, Jr., President, Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis, and Shelby Cullom Davis Professor of International Security Studies The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Very few secessionist movements in the last half-century have succeeded in establishing their own internationally recognized states. In part, this is because the international community, and leading states in particular, have been reluctant to convey their material support or political recognition to such efforts. Farkas' book takes the reader inside the political decision making process of one key actor, the United States. In doing so, she confirms that some concerns are as important as expected (e.g., regional security), but also critically that other factors thought to be significant in US foreign policy making (e.g., interest groups) were peripheral at best in US decisions to support or withold support from partition proposals." -- Paul F. Diehl, Professor of Political Science, University of Illinois This timely study constitutes an outstanding contribution to the literature on ethnic conflict and contemporary U.S. foreign policy. Based on meticulous research, first-hand work in Bosnia in 1996, and focused on the ethno-religious wars that swept across Bosnia in the 1990s, as well as the 1991 conflicts in Iraq and Ethiopia, this volume provides a truly unique analysis and resource for understanding how and why states are partitioned. -- Robert L. Pfaltzgraff, Jr. President, Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis, and Shelby Cullom Davis Professor of International Security Studies The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
When does the US support partition of a warring or failing state? Why has the US supported partition for some secessionists, or irredentists, but not for others? Is it a policy of last resort or are there certain variables that are strong determinants of this position right from the start? This book seeks to answer these questions by examining US policy toward secessionist movements in three countries during the first decade following the end of the Cold War: Iraq, Ethiopia, and Bosnia-Hercegovina.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. xi
Mapsp. xiv
Introductionp. 1
Managing Ethnic Conflictp. 5
Iraqp. 17
Ethiopiap. 47
Bosnia-Hercegovinap. 71
Conclusionsp. 109
Notesp. 127
Bibliographyp. 147
Indexp. 165
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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