Catalogue


Germans or foreigners? : attitudes toward ethnic minorities in post-reunification Germany /
edited by Richard Alba, Peter Schmidt, and Martina Wasmer.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.
description
viii, 308 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
1403963789
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.
isbn
1403963789
catalogue key
5236917
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [287]-301) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-09-01:
The movement of immigrants across Europe and among the European Economic Community is an interesting study in "who belongs," "who fits," and "who moves up the socioeconomic ladder." Labor shortages and aging populations in industrialized countries have brought immigration laws and quotas to the forefront of public policy and debate. Germany is no exception. Immediately after WW II, a shortage of male workers drew a labor pool from Italy and Turkey. Although many guest workers and their progeny remain in Germany, they are conspicuously "outsiders." German citizenship laws have, until recently, not looked to "place of birth," but to jus sanguinis (blood birthright). Thus, citizens from the former Soviet Republics have received citizenship and assistance in resettlement, although many are unable to speak their new language, while third-generation guest workers are still viewed as foreigners. These essays examine the enigmatic approaches and attitudes of the German government and its peoples toward those whose labor is very necessary to economic health of the country. This is important and necessary reading for social scientists and students in sociology, political science, and economics. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. A. S. Hunter Idaho State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Alba, Schmidt and Wasmer have assembled an impressive group of well-informed authors whose contributions provide much-needed insight and clarification about the situation in which ethnic minorities find themselves in post-reunification Germany. Combining statistical evidence with in-depth qualitative analysis, this volume is an excellent example of how scholarship can be relevant and readable at the same time. This book is essential reading for academics and students interested in contemporary Germany and its minorities." -- Stefan Wolff, University of Bath In this carefully researched and balanced analysis, Richard Alba and his German colleagues present powerful evidence concerning so many of the key issues in the debate about Germany's current attitudes towards diversity. Various chapters provide insight and analysis of ethnocentrism, civil rights, anti-semitism, authoritarianism, the Far Right, and the legacy of regional divisions. This is a fascinating and authoritative study for anyone wishing to understand the complexity of contemporary Germany and the ethnic dynamics of the new Europe. -- John Stone, Boston University Focussing on immigration demographics and the social and psychological determinants of mass-level German xenophobia, this edited volume gives English-speaking readers unparalleled access to the work of Germany's top scholars of ethnic attitudes. Especially path-breaking are the authors' application of "symbolic racism" theory in the German context and their findings that current German anti-Semitism is linked to anti-Muslim sentiment and that Germany's proportion of immigrants is higher than even the United States'. This book is mandatory reading for all students of contemporary German public opinion, immigration politics, and ethnic relations. --Joel S. Fetzer Assistant Professor of Political Science, Pepperdine University, and author,Public Attitudes toward Immigration in the United States, France, and Germany
"Alba, Schmidt and Wasmer have assembled an impressive group of well-informed authors whose contributions provide much-needed insight and clarification about the situation in which ethnic minorities find themselves in post-reunification Germany. Combining statistical evidence with in-depth qualitative analysis, this volume is an excellent example of how scholarship can be relevant and readable at the same time. This book is essential reading for academics and students interested in contemporary Germany and its minorities." -- Stefan Wolff, University of Bath In this carefully researched and balanced analysis, Richard Alba and his German colleagues present powerful evidence concerning so many of the key issues in the debate about Germany's current attitudes towards diversity. Various chapters provide insight and analysis of ethnocentrism, civil rights, anti-semitism, authoritarianism, the Far Right, and the legacy of regional divisions. This is a fascinating and authoritative study for anyone wishing to understand the complexity of contemporary Germany and the ethnic dynamics of the new Europe. -- John Stone, Boston University Focussing on immigration demographics and the social and psychological determinants of mass-level German xenophobia, this edited volume gives English-speaking readers unparalleled access to the work of Germany's top scholars of ethnic attitudes. Especially path-breaking are the authors' application of "symbolic racism" theory in the German context and their findings that current German anti-Semitism is linked to anti-Muslim sentiment and that Germany's proportion of immigrants is higher than even the United States'. This book is mandatory reading for all students of contemporary German public opinion, immigration politics, and ethnic relations. --Joel S. Fetzer Assistant Professor of Political Science, Pepperdine University, and author, Public Attitudes toward Immigration in the United States, France, and Germany
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Choice, September 2004
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Summaries
Main Description
This book examines contemporary attitudes towards ethnic minorities in Germany. These minorities include some of immigrant origin, such as Italians, Turks, and asylum seekers, and the principal non-immigrant minority, Jews.While the findings demonstrate that intense prejudice against minorities is not widespread among Germans, many of whom in fact can be considered immigrant- and minority-friendly, a crystallization of attitudes is also evident:that is, attitudes towards immigrants are strongly correlated with anti-Semitism and with other worldview dimensions, such as positioning in the left-right political spectrum.In this sense, the fundamental question of whether immigrants and other minorities should be regarded as fellow citizens or ethnic outsiders remains relevant in the German context.
Description for Bookstore
This book examines contemporary attitudes towards ethnic minorities in Germany. These minorities include some of immigrant origin, such as Italians, Turks, and asylum seekers, and the principal non-immigrant minority, Jews. While the findings demonstrate that intense prejudice against minorities is not widespread among Germans, many of whom in fact can be considered immigrant- and minority-friendly, a crystallization of attitudes is also evident: that is, attitudes towards immigrants are strongly correlated with anti-Semitism and with other worldview dimensions, such as positioning in the left-right political spectrum. In this sense, the fundamental question of whether immigrants and other minorities should be regarded as fellow citizens or ethnic outsiders remains relevant in the German context.
Table of Contents
Introduction
The Ethnic and Demographic Structure of Foreigners and Immigrants in Germany
On the Economic and Social Situations of Immigrants Living in Germany
Ethnocentrism in Germany: Worldview Connections and Social Contexts
The Others and We: Relationships between Germans and Non-Germans from the Point of View of Foreigners Living in Germany
Measuring Contemporary Prejudice Towards Immigrants in Germany
Anti-Semitism in the Late 1990's
Foreigners as Second Class Citizens?: Attitudes Toward Equal Civil Rights for Non-Germans
Authoritarianism and Ethnocentrism in East and West Germany: Does the System Matter?
Ethnocentrism and Support for Extreme-Right Parties, 1980-1996
Social Distance and Physical Proximity: Day-to-Day Attitudes and Experience of Foreigners and Germans Living in the Same Residential Areas
Regional Influences on Attitudes Towards Foreigners
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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