Catalogue


The contribution of early travel narratives to the historical geography of Greece : a lecture delivered at New College, Oxford, on 6th May, 2003 /
by Malcolm Wagstaf.
imprint
Oxford : University of Oxford, 2004.
description
15 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0954664701
format(s)
Book
Holdings
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
The personal accounts, journals and letters of early West European travellers have, for many years, formed an important source of information for historians. In this lecture, delivered at New College, Oxford in May 2003, Malcolm Wagstaff examines why scholars have used travel narratives, how they have used them and the types of information they contain. Looking in particular at those who travelled to Greece in the long' 18th century (1685/90-1830), he addresses the methodological problems in using them as a source, warning that they should not be plundered unreservedly for the data that they contain. Defining the remits of historical geography, Wagstaff reflects on the topics covered by those recording this golden age of travel, including personal observations and experiences of climate, the appearance of places, sites and landscapes, the economy and landuse, administration and routes.
Unpaid Annotation
The "long" eighteenth century (1685-1830) can be seen as a golden age of travel writing. Gentlemen scholars made their way to Greece, through Europe, and recorded their journeys in the form of prose journals or letters. These personal accounts were of course composed by men whose education had been based on Classical learning, but 'Greece' at that time was no more than a geographical expression, being as it was subsumed into the Ottoman Empire. These early travel narratives, then were important in bringing back to life some of the lost glory of ancient Greece in popular culture, and even served as important reference tools for early nineteenth century geographers. Wagstaff looks at the impact of these narratives but reminds us to be cautious in relying on such sources, which should be seen within their historical context.
Unpaid Annotation
"The ""long"" eighteenth century (1685-1830) can be seen as a golden age of travel writing. Gentlemen scholars made their way to Greece, through Europe, and recorded their journeys in the form of prose journals or letters. These personal accounts were of course composed by men whose education had been based on Classical learning, but 'Greece' at that time was no more than a geographical expression, being as it was subsumed into the Ottoman Empire. These early travel narratives, then were important in bringing back to life some of the lost glory of ancient Greece in popular culture, and even served as important reference tools for early nineteenth century geographers. Wagstaff looks at the impact of these narratives but reminds us to be cautious in relying on such sources, which should be seen within their historical context."
Long Description
The personal accounts, journals and letters of early West European travellers have, for many years, formed an important source of information for historians. In this lecture, delivered at New College, Oxford in May 2003, Malcolm Wagstaff examines why scholars have used travel narratives, how they have used them and the types of information they contain. Looking in particular at those who travelled to Greece in the 'long' 18th century (1685/90-1830), he addresses the methodological problems in using them as a source, warning that they should not be plundered unreservedly for the data that they contain. Defining the remits of historical geography, Wagstaff reflects on the topics covered by those recording this golden age of travel, including personal observations and experiences of climate, the appearance of places, sites and landscapes, the economy and landuse, administration and routes.

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