Catalogue


English clandestine satire, 1660-1702 /
Harold Love.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2004.
description
vi, 431 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
019925561X (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2004.
isbn
019925561X (hbk.)
catalogue key
5223173
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-05-01:
Love (Monash Univ. and author of Scribal Publication in Seventeenth-Century England, 1993) offers an illuminating study of 17th-century English lampoon. Writing these cruel, and typically extremely coarse, satires of the famous and powerful was one way for an individual to become recognized as a "wit" in both the courtly setting and the developing world of the town. Most lampoons were amateur verse, crude but effective, that relayed political and religious hostilities, no more civilized forum for expression of such thoughts then being available. Love demonstrates the literary importance of some clandestine satire by major poets, and he questions the exclusion from critical discussion of certain works, for example those by John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester, and by Andrew Marvell. This discussion affords Love opportunity to examine the social, sexual, political, and poetic behaviors of the era, including the earliest manifestations of the coffee-house sphere, which would become so important in the 18th century. The author also proffers a poetics of the lampoon, questioning whether and to what extent lampoons by amateur poets can be considered as literature. A first-line index to selected anthologies of clandestine satire is included as an appendix. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Graduate and research collections. G. Shivel University of Miami
Reviews
Review Quotes
A paean to almost forgotten virtues
"Love's winning combination of imaginative critical synthesis and scholarly exactitude makes English Clandestine Satire a likely incitement to important new work for years to come."--Studies in English Literature 1500-1900 "Love offers an illuminating study of 17th-century English lampoon."--Choice
"Love's winning combination of imaginative critical synthesis and scholarly exactitude makesEnglish Clandestine Satirea likely incitement to important new work for years to come."--Studies in English Literature 1500-1900 "Love offers an illuminating study of 17th-century English lampoon."--Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2005
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Harold Love presents a comprehensive account of the thousands of lampoons and more serious 'state poems' that survive from Restoration England and their impact on the life of the nation and the literary practice of satire.
Main Description
In early modern Britain, the primary medium of free comment was the clandestine satire, circulated either orally or in manuscript. Part of the national political culture from Jacobean times, satire reached its greatest influence following the Restoration of Charles II, when a new 'easy' style,combining courtly polish with demotic frankness and flagrant indecency, led to the composition of thousands of such poems. Most of the poets of the time, including such major talents as Marvell and Rochester, wrote in the genre, though nearly always anonymously. While its chief targets werepolitical, much Restoration satire concerned itself with the emerging demography of 'Town' and its uncertain experimentation with new kinds of social freedom. Attacks on the sexual misbehaviour (real or imagined) of aristocratic women hover, equally uncertainly, between moral condemnation andill-disguised envy, while also conferring an inverse celebrity status on their victims. In this paradoxical social world, not to be lampooned could mean that one was no longer a person of importance. In the first comprehensive survey of this vast field, Harold Love considers the relationship of the lampoon to gossip, how one might construct a poetics of the genre, and how clandestine satire reached and was received by its readers. Constructing three primary categories of 'court', 'Town' and'state' lampooning, Love argues that far from being the product of isolated disaffection, most satire was the work of a circle of recognized poets, frequently operating in collaboration. An extensive first-line index to the principal manuscript sources for clandestine satire makes this book an opensesame to further exploration of its fascinating field.
Main Description
In the first comprehensive survey of this vast field, Harold Love considers the relationship of the lampoon to gossip, how one might construct a poetics of the genre, and how clandestine satire reached and was received by its readers. Constructing three primary categories of "court," "Town" and "state" lampooning, Love argues that far from being the product of isolated disaffection, most satire was the work of a circle of recognized poets, frequently operating in collaboration. An extensive first-line index to the principal manuscript sources for clandestine satire makes this book an open sesame to further exploration of its fascinating field.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
Introduction
The Court Lampoon
The Town Lampoon
State Satire
Authorship
Lampoons and the Culture of Gossip
A Poetics of the Lampoon
Distribution and Readership
Bibliography
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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