Catalogue


Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald : an American woman's life /
Linda Wagner-Martin.
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2004.
description
xv, 251 p. : ill.
ISBN
1403934037
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2004.
isbn
1403934037
catalogue key
5222961
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Linda Wagner-Martin is the Frank Borden Hanes Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2004-10-25:
Prolific literary biographer Wagner-Martin (Sylvia Plath, etc.) utilizes newly available files at Princeton for this fresh reassessment of F. Scott Fitzgerald's flamboyant, creative, troubled wife, stressing that Zelda's personality and character were shaped by her Southern upbringing and her relationship with her parents. Using documents pertaining to Zelda's psychiatric history and the works of contemporary psychologists to interpret the behavior that institutionalized Zelda (1900-1948) for the last half of her short life, Wagner-Martin concludes that it was Scott who drove Zelda into breakdown, with his compulsive drinking, cruel and abusive behavior, and scathing criticism of Zelda as a "third rate" writer and dancer. While Wagner-Martin sometimes uses such constructions as "it could be" to assess Zelda's state of mind and speculate about what was apparently the misdiagnosis of schizophrenia, she cogently argues that Zelda's breakdown was basically caused by her feelings of inferiority to Scott, her desire to alleviate their financial insolvency and, above all, the need to express herself creatively. Each attempt, she shows, was jealously blocked by Scott. Wagner-Martin's sturdy analysis does much to dispel the myth that the necessity of coping with Zelda's mental problems was Scott's tragic nemesis, effectively suggesting instead that "Zelda's crack-up gave him both alibi and cover" and that his alcoholism and "mean, inhuman" behavior toward Zelda were responsible for the destruction of two lives. 11 b&w illus. (Nov.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews,
Library Journal,
Publishers Weekly, October 2004
Booklist, November 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Using cultural and gender studies as contexts, Wagner-Martin brings new information to the story of the Alabama judge's daughter who, at 17, met her husband-to-be, Scott Fitzgerald, who swept her away from her stable home life into Jazz Age New York and Paris.
Main Description
Linda Wagner-Martin has created a new kind of biography of Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald: Zelda's story from her perspective, instead of her famous husband's. This is the first biography to tell her entire life story, describing what it meant to be born in 1900, and then to be a "New Woman" in Montgomery, Alabama. Featuring for the first time information from the newly available archives at Princeton, Wagner-Martin vividly illustrates Zelda's psychiatric landscape. Detailed discussions of the roots of alcoholism and infidelity are juxtaposed with the first comprehensive critiques of Zelda's diverse artistic accomplishments as a dancer, short story writer, essayist and novelist. This is an evocative portrayal of a talented woman's professional and emotional conflicts, a story with as much relevance today as it had half a century ago.
Short Annotation
Linda Wagner-Martin has created a new kind of biography of Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald: Zelda's story from her perspective, instead of her famous husband's. Featuring for the first time information from the archives at Princeton, Wagner-Martin illustrates Zelda's psychiatric landscape. Detailed discussions of the roots of alcoholism and infidelity are juxtaposed with the first comprehensive critiques of Zelda's diverse artistic accomplishments as a dancer, short story writer, essayist and novelist.
Description for Bookstore
Linda Wagner-Martin'sZelda Sayre Fitzgeraldis a twenty-first century story. Using cultural and gender studies as contexts, Wagner-Martin brings new information to the story of the Alabama judge's daughter who, at seventeen, met her husband-to-be, Scott Fitzgerald. Swept away from her stable home life into Jazz Age New York and Paris, Zelda eventually learned to be a writer and a painter; and she came close to being a ballerina. An evocative portrayal of a talented woman's professional and emotional conflicts, this study contains extensive notes and new photographs.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Short Titles and Abbreviationsp. xiv
The Bellep. 1
The Courtshipp. 25
Celebrity Couplep. 41
Travelsp. 61
Europe Once Morep. 77
Hollywood and Ellersliep. 95
Zelda as Artist: Dancer and Writerp. 107
The Crack-Up, 1930p. 120
On the Way to Being Curedp. 138
The Phipps Clinic and Baltimorep. 154
Zelda as Patientp. 174
The Crack-Up, 1936p. 187
Endingsp. 197
Notesp. 212
Bibliographyp. 234
Indexp. 244
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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