Catalogue


Brothers one and all : esprit de corps in a Civil War regiment /
Mark H. Dunkelman.
imprint
Baton Rouge : Louisiana State University Press, c2004.
description
xii, 344 p.
ISBN
080712978X (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Baton Rouge : Louisiana State University Press, c2004.
isbn
080712978X (hardcover : alk. paper)
catalogue key
5220474
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Mark H. Dunkelman is the author of The Hardtack Regiment: An Illustrated History of the 154th Regiment, New York State Infantry Volunteers and Gettysburg's Unknown Soldier: The Life, Death, and Celebrity of Amos Humiston. He lives in Providence, Rhode Island
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-05-01:
This book delivers more than its title suggests. Besides being a study of the development and effects of esprit de corps, it also relates the experiences of common soldiers in the 154th New York during a career that took it through heavy combat at Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Rocky Face Ridge, and other battles. Dunkelman, who earlier wrote a full history of the 154th as well as a biography of its most famous soldier (Gettysburg's Unknown Soldier: The Life, Death, and Celebrity of Amos Humiston, CH, Oct'99, 37-1108), argues here that the 154th, like other Civil War regiments, developed a common spirit that bound the members closely to each other and to the group. He posits that mutually shared hardships and, especially, the common experience of battle were the chief factors in creating this esprit. On the other hand, Dunkelman maintains, religion was a divisive factor, largely because of the strongly and sometimes violently anti-Christian reaction of the roughly half the regiment's members who were irreligious. Opinions about slavery and blacks were also divisive, as attitudes within the regiment ranged from abolitionist to racist. For the most part, esprit de corps was able to overcome these differences. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. S. E. Woodworth Texas Christian University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2005
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Mark H. Dunkelman identifies the characteristics of Civil War esprit de corps and charts its development from recruitment and combat to the end of the war and beyond through the experiences of a single regiment, the 154th New York Volunteer Infantry.
Bowker Data Service Summary
In 'Brothers One and All', Mark H. Dunkelman identifies the characteristics of Civil War espirit de corps and charts its development from recruitment and combat to the end of the war and beyond through the experiences of a single regiment, the 154th New York Volunteer Infantry.
Unpaid Annotation
In Brothers One and All, Mark H. Dunkelman identifies the characteristics of Civil War esprit de corps and charts its development from recruitment and combat to the end of the war and beyond throught the experiences of a single regiment, the 154th New York Volunteer Infantry. Dunkelman offers a unique psychological portrait of a frontline company that fought with distinction at Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Lookout Valley, Rocky Face Ridge, and other engagements. Drawing on three decades of research, he traces the evolution of natural camaraderie among friends and neighbors into a more profound sense of pride, enthusiasm, and loyalty forged as much in the shared unpleasantness of day-to-day army life as in the terrifying ordeal of battle. Brothers One and All reveals precisely how esprit de corps gave the men of the 154th reason to keep marching and fighting despite boredom, homesickness, illness, and the death of comrades. And while Dunkelman notes the limits of regimental loyalty in instances of cowardice, malingering, and desertion, he finds that most of the men shared an abiding concern for their regiment's reputation and honor. Even after war's end, a strong sense of esprit de corps survived among veterans, who for decades attended regimental reunions and contributed to war memorials. With freshness and striking effect, Dunkelman has re-created the particular experiences of the 154th while offering universal insights into the nature of war and the bonds between soldiers.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introduction: This Little Bandp. 1
Home Ties
Demographics and Identityp. 15
Lines of Communicationp. 30
Friends and Foesp. 54
War Ties
Comrades, Cowards, and Survivorsp. 75
Enduring Hardshipsp. 98
On the Battlefieldp. 120
The Wounded, Captured, and Deadp. 142
In Camp and Beyondp. 170
Shoulder Straps and Courts-Martialp. 205
Morale and Regimental Pridep. 226
Veteran Ties
E. D. Northrup and the Betrayal of Esprit de Corpsp. 251
Notesp. 279
Bibliographyp. 315
Indexp. 327
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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