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A companion for owls : being the commonplace book of D. Boone, long hunter, back woodsman, etc. /
Maurice Manning.
imprint
Orlando : Harcourt, c2004.
description
128 p.
ISBN
0151010498
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Orlando : Harcourt, c2004.
isbn
0151010498
catalogue key
5220458
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Maurice Manning is a native of Kentucky. His first collection, Lawrence Booth's Book of Visions, won the Yale Younger Poets Award. His poems have appeared in the Southern Review, the Virginia Quarterly Review, and the New Yorker. He teaches English at Indiana University.
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Excerpts
Excerpt from Book
On God Is there a god of the gulf between a man and a horse? A god who hovers above the trench of difference? Not a god who makes us notice; but a god who rakes his hand through the air and makes a space neither can enter. What about a god of animal innards? Some god whose sole creation cleans the blood of an elk? Perhaps there's a god of petty disaster who breaks wagon wheels and paints clouds across an old man's eyes. Consider the gods of flint and primer who work side by side with the gods of spark and steel; then there's the god of aim and the god of near death-a god commonly praised. Consider a god of small spaces, a fat man's misery god, who lives in the shadow between two rocks and sleeps on moss, content with the smallness of his task; the god who bends rivers, the god who flecks the breast of a hawk, the god who plunders saltworks. I once thought one god looked over my shoulder and measured my steps, but now I believe that god is outnumbered and I am surrounded by countless naked gods, like spores or dust or birds or trees on fire, the song, the grit, the mean seed of nakedness. Copyright 2004 by Maurice Manning All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Requests for permission to make copies of any part of the work should be mailed to the following address: Permissions Department, Harcourt, Inc., 6277 Sea Harbor Drive, Orlando, Florida 32887-6777.
First Chapter
On God

Is there a god of the gulf between a man
and a horse? A god who hovers above the trench
of difference? Not a god who makes us notice;
but a god who rakes his hand through the air and makes
a space neither can enter. What about
a god of animal innards? Some god
whose sole creation cleans the blood of an elk?
Perhaps there's a god of petty disaster
who breaks wagon wheels and paints clouds across
an old man's eyes. Consider the gods of flint
and primer who work side by side with the gods
of spark and steel; then there's the god of aim
and the god of near death-a god commonly praised.
Consider a god of small spaces, a fat
man's misery god, who lives in the shadow
between two rocks and sleeps on moss, content
with the smallness of his task; the god who bends
rivers, the god who flecks the breast of a hawk,
the god who plunders saltworks. I once thought
one god looked over my shoulder and measured
my steps, but now I believe that god is outnumbered
and I am surrounded by countless naked gods,
like spores or dust or birds or trees on fire,
the song, the grit, the mean seed of nakedness.


Copyright © 2004 by Maurice Manning

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.

Requests for permission to make copies of any part of the work should be mailed to the following address: Permissions Department, Harcourt, Inc., 6277 Sea Harbor Drive, Orlando, Florida 32887-6777.
Reviews
Review Quotes
PRAISE FOR THE POETRY OF MAURICE MANNING"A fresh and brilliant talent."
PRAISE FOR THE POETRY OF MAURICE MANNING "A fresh and brilliant talent."-W. S. Merwin
Starred Review* With this masterful interpretation of the quintessential American pioneer, Manning raises the ante for all future practitioners of one of the most fruitful kinds of long poem-sequence: the biography-in-poems. Robert Peters' treatments of Shaker founder Ann Lee (The Gift to Be Simple, 1975), explorer Elisha Kent Kane (kane, 1986), and others focused on their subjects' psychology. Joan Murray's Queen of the Mist (1999, about Annie Taylor, the first person to ride over Niagara Falls in a barrel), Jean Nordhaus' The Porcelain Apes of Moses Mendelssohn (2002), Sharon Chmielarz's The Other Mozart (2001), and Robert Cooperman's Keats sequence, Petitions for Immortality [BKL Ap 15 03], are dramatic and historical. Manning's portrayal of Daniel Boone, however, is philosophical. The semiliterate adventurer and small-time entrepreneur Boone is, per Manning, the ideal unselfish American individualist and the embodiment of that figure so earnestly admired by literary romanticism, the natural man. This may sound like the recipe for a dull read, but the individual poems, even at their most ruminative (in the opening section, "Meditations"), are exceedingly tangible and exciting, referring constantly to the material world and bodily existence and further grounded by genuine biographical events. Moreover, the most speculative aspects of Manning's enterprise, on Boone's possible inspiration of the English Romantics, appear only in an appended essay, which, however, readers ignore at their loss. Ray OlsonCopyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved
This item was reviewed in:
Booklist, September 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
This collection of highly original narrative poems is written in the voice of frontiersman Daniel Boone and captures all the beauty and struggle of nascent America. We follow the progression of Daniel Boone's life, a life led in war and in the wilderness, and see the birth of a new nation. We track the bountiful animals and the great, undisturbed rivers. We stand beside Boone as he buries his brother, then his wife, and finds comfort in his friendship with a slave named Derry. Praised for his originality, Maurice Manning is an exciting new voice in American poetry. The darkest place I've ever been did not require a name. It seemed to be a gathering place for the lint of the world. The bottom of a hollow beneath two ridges, sunk like a stone. The water was surely old, the dregs of some ancient sea, but purified by time, like a man made better by his years, his old hurts absorbed into his soul, his losses like a spring in his breast. -from "Born Again"
Main Description
This collection of highly original narrative poems is written in the voice of frontiersman Daniel Boone and captures all the beauty and struggle of nascent America. We follow the progression of Daniel Boone's life, a life led in war and in the wilderness, and see the birth of a new nation. We track the bountiful animals and the great, undisturbed rivers. We stand beside Boone as he buries his brother, then his wife, and finds comfort in his friendship with a slave named Derry. Praised for his originality, Maurice Manning is an exciting new voice in American poetry.The darkest place I've ever beendid not require a name. It seemedto be a gathering place for the lintof the world. The bottom of a hollowbeneath two ridges, sunk like a stone.The water was surely old, the dregsof some ancient sea, but purifiedby time, like a man made better by his years, his old hurts absorbed intohis soul, his losses like a springin his breast. -from "Born Again"
Table of Contents
Meditations
On Godp. 5
Firstp. 6
Without a Visionp. 7
The Meaning of Timep. 8
The Sum Result of Speculationp. 9
A Possible Blessingp. 10
Eight Analytical Questionsp. 11
Dog Dayp. 12
That I Am Essential to Creationp. 13
Schuylkill Country, 1742p. 14
On the Whole, the World Is Levelp. 15
On the Property of Magnetismp. 16
One of Many Mysteriesp. 17
Born Againp. 18
The Wages of Dominionp. 19
A Wife's Talep. 20
Jemima's Idyllp. 21
On Deathp. 22
Fancies
Sleeping in the Wildernessp. 27
Sheltoweep. 28
Advice to Roversp. 29
A Compendium of Treesp. 30
Earlyp. 31
An Ode to Kinnikinnickp. 32
A Comment on the Gentryp. 33
Ten Things to Say to Hendersonp. 34
A Study of Heftp. 35
Drunk: July 1787p. 36
A Recipe for Chinkp. 37
An Appointment with Captain Imlay, Esquire, Dandy, Rakep. 38
Wabete's Seasonp. 39
Considerations: December 1799p. 40
A Description of a Dream or Premonitionp. 41
Amendmentsp. 42
A Contemplation of the Celestial Worldp. 43
Pissing in a Stumpp. 44
Letters From Squirep. 49
Apologies
On Being Raised Quakerp. 61
Bad Waterp. 62
On the Limits of Natural Lawp. 63
A Moment of Self-effacementp. 64
A Syllogismp. 65
"D. Boon Kilt Bar on This Tree, 1760"p. 66
A Brief Religious Inquiryp. 67
The Curious Manner of the Antitheticalp. 68
Felix Culpa from a Precipice, 1771p. 70
On the Season of Rainp. 71
"Old Isaac"p. 72
To the Discovery Corps: May 23, 1804p. 73
An Apology for Unknowingp. 75
The Pleasure of Stasisp. 76
Dryocopus pileatusp. 77
An Elegy for the Moonp. 78
Opposition to Bridgesp. 80
A Description of a Crude Machinep. 81
Notes on "The Natural Man"p. 82
On Freedomp. 83
Testamentp. 84
Illustrations, Inventories, and Maps
Feathersp. 89
Petroglyphp. 90
Small Possessions I Prizep. 91
A Rendering of What I Carved on a Beech Tree in Missouri upon Hearing of Gen. Harrison's "Great Victory," November 1811p. 92
A Miscellaneous Inventoryp. 93
An Image of My Foot Showing Blood, Sundry Wounds, and the Ring of Sadnessp. 94
A Map of Heavenp. 95
Notesp. 97
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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