Catalogue

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Transnational women's activism : the United States, Japan, and Japanese immigrant communities in California, 1859-1920 /
Rumi Yasutake.
imprint
New York : New York University Press, c2004.
description
x, 185 p.
ISBN
0814797032 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : New York University Press, c2004.
isbn
0814797032 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Tilling the ground -- Sprouting feminist consciousness -- Managing WCTU activism in the Japanese way in Late Meiji Japan -- Beyond Japan to California.
catalogue key
5216303
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Rumi Yasutake has taught at UCLA, California State University, Long Beach, and Konan University in Kobe, Japan, where she is an associate professor of American Studies.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Amid much talk about transnationalism, Rumi Yasutake has produced the real thing. Her research and insights into the three-way relationship between the American, Japanese, and Japanese-American WCTUs add great depth to our understanding of the complex interactions between the aspirations, achievements, and restraints of women working within different political and cultural environments A truly original contribution to women's history scholarship."
"Amid much talk about transnationalism, Rumi Yasutake has produced the real thing. Her research and insights into the three-way relationship between the American, Japanese, and Japanese-American WCTUs add great depth to our understanding of the complex interactions between the aspirations, achievements, and restraints of women working within different political and cultural environments A truly original contribution to women's history scholarship." - Ellen Carol DuBois, author of Harriot Stanton Blatch and the Winning of Woman Suffrage
"Amid much talk about transnationalism, Rumi Yasutake has produced the real thing. Her research and insights into the three-way relationship between the American, Japanese, and Japanese-American WCTUs add great depth to our understanding of the complex interactions between the aspirations, achievements, and restraints of women working within different political and cultural environments A truly original contribution to women's history scholarship." - Ellen Carol DuBois, author ofHarriot Stanton Blatch and the Winning of Woman Suffrage
"Amid much talk about transnationalism, Rumi Yasutake has produced the real thing. Her research and insights into the three-way relationship between the American, Japanese, and Japanese-American WCTUs add great depth to our understanding of the complex interactions between the aspirations, achievements, and restraints of women working within different political and cultural environments A truly original contribution to women's history scholarship."--Ellen Carol DuBois, author of Harriot Stanton Blatch and the Winning of Woman Suffrage "A very impressive exploration of the fascinating and complex interaction between North American and Japanese women in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Yasutake's book reminds us that the problems of transnational feminisms are not new, and that the challenges embedded in the U.S.-Japanese relationship-race, class, nation-were played out in gendered contexts as well."--Sharon Sievers, co-author of Women in Asia "Yasutake skillfully untangles the relationship between 'race,' gender, 'culture,' nationalism, and religion. Through a careful analysis of Japanese and English language sources, she presents the complex story of how the spread of the American WCTU's temperance movement to Japan was culturally imperialist on the one hand and yet served Japanese nationalist and imperialist ends in Asia and among the Japanese immigrants in California, while at the same time stretching the sphere of recognized political and social activity Japanese women could engage in near the turn of the twentieth century. Her work should be read by those interested in feminism, religion, 'race,' and 'culture.'"--Brian Masaru Hayashi, Kyoto University
"A very impressive exploration of the fascinating and complex interaction between North American and Japanese women in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Yasutake's book reminds us that the problems of transnational feminisms are not new, and that the challenges embedded in the U.S.-Japanese relationship-race, class, nation-were played out in gendered contexts as well."
"A very impressive exploration of the fascinating and complex interaction between North American and Japanese women in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Yasutake's book reminds us that the problems of transnational feminisms are not new, and that the challenges embedded in the U.S.-Japanese relationship-race, class, nation-were played out in gendered contexts as well." - Sharon Sievers, co-author of Women in Asia
"A very impressive exploration of the fascinating and complex interaction between North American and Japanese women in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Yasutake's book reminds us that the problems of transnational feminisms are not new, and that the challenges embedded in the U.S.-Japanese relationship-race, class, nation-were played out in gendered contexts as well." - Sharon Sievers, co-author ofWomen in Asia
"Yasutake skillfully untangles the relationship between 'race,' gender, 'culture,' nationalism, and religion. Through a careful analysis of Japanese and English language sources, she presents the complex story of how the spread of the American WCTU's temperance movement to Japan was culturally imperialist on the one hand and yet served Japanese nationalist and imperialist ends in Asia and among the Japanese immigrants in California, while at the same time stretching the sphere of recognized political and social activity Japanese women could engage in near the turn of the twentieth century. Her work should be read by those interested in feminism, religion, 'race,' and 'culture.'" - Brian Masaru Hayashi, Kyoto University
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Following trade agreements between Japan and the US in the 1850s, Tokyo began importing an American commodity - Western social activism. Rumi Yasutake illuminates the motivations and experiences of American missionaries, U.S. WCTU workers, and their Japanese protégés.
Main Description
Amid much talk about transnationalism, Rumi Yasutake has produced the real thing. Her research and insights into the three-way relationship between the American, Japanese, and Japanese-American WCTUs add great depth to our understanding of the complex interactions between the aspirations, achievements, and restraints of women working within different political and cultural environments A truly original contribution to women's history scholarship.--Ellen Carol DuBois, author of Harriot Stanton Blatch and the Winning of Woman SuffrageA very impressive exploration of the fascinating and complex interaction between North American and Japanese women in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Yasutake's book reminds us that the problems of transnational feminisms are not new, and that the challenges embedded in the U.S.-Japanese relationship-race, class, nation-were played out in gendered contexts as well.--Sharon Sievers, co-author of Women in AsiaYasutake skillfully untangles the relationship between 'race,' gender, 'culture,' nationalism, and religion. Through a careful analysis of Japanese and English language sources, she presents the complex story of how the spread of the American WCTU's temperance movement to Japan was culturally imperialist on the one hand and yet served Japanese nationalist and imperialist ends in Asia and among the Japanese immigrants in California, while at the same time stretching the sphere of recognized political and social activity Japanese women could engage in near the turn of the twentieth century. Her work should be read by those interested in feminism, religion, 'race,' and 'culture.'--Brian Masaru Hayashi, Kyoto UniversityFollowing landmark trade agreements between Japan and the United States in the 1850s, Tokyo began importing a unique American commodity: Western social activism. As Japan sought to secure its future as a commercial power and American women pursued avenues of political expression, Protestant church-women and, later, members of the Women's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) traveled to the Asian coast to promote Christian teachings and women's social activism.Rumi Yasutake reveals in Transnational Women's Activism that the resulting American, Japanese, and first generation Japanese-American women's movements came to affect more than alcohol or even religion. While the WCTU employed the language of evangelism and Victorian family values, its members were tactfully expedient in accommodating their traditional causes to suffrage and other feminist goals, in addition to the various political currents flowing through Japan and the United States at the turn of the nineteenth century.Exploring such issues as gender struggles in the American Protestant church and bourgeois Japanese women's attitudes towards the pleasure class of geishas and prostitutes, Yasutake illuminates the motivations and experiences of American missionaries, U.S. WCTU workers, and their Japanese prot'g's. The diverse machinations of WCTU activism offer a compelling lesson in the complexities of cultural imperialism.
Main Description
China is the fastest-growing economy in the world today. For many on the left, the Chinese economy seems to provide an alternative model of development to that of neoliberal globalization. Although it is a disputed question whether the Chinese economy can be still described as socialist, there is no doubting the importance for the global project of socialism of accurately interpreting and soberly assessing its real prospects. China and Socialism argues that market reforms in China are leading inexorably toward a capitalist and foreign-dominated development path, with enormous social and politcal costs, both domestically and internationally. The rapid economic growth that accompanied these market reforms have not been due to efficiency gains, but rather to deliberate erosion of the infrastructure that made possible a remarkable degree of equality. The transition to the market has been based on rising unemployment, intensified exploitation, declining health and education services, exploding government debt, and unstable prices. At the same time, China's economic transformation has intensified the contradictions of capitalist development in other countries, especially in East Asia. Far from being a model that is replicable in other Third World countries, China today is a reminder of the need for socialism to be built from the grassroots up, through class struggle and international solidarity.
Main Description
Following landmark trade agreements between Japan and the United States in the 1850s, Tokyo began importing a unique American commodity: Western social activism. As Japan sought to secure its future as a commercial power and American women pursued avenues of political expression, Protestant church-women and, later, members of the Women's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) traveled to the Asian coast to promote Christian teachings and women's social activism. Rumi Yasutake reveals in Transnational Women's Activism that the resulting American, Japanese, and first generation Japanese-American women's movements came to affect more than alcohol or even religion. While the WCTU employed the language of evangelism and Victorian family values, its members were tactfully expedient in accommodating their traditional causes to suffrage and other feminist goals, in addition to the various political currents flowing through Japan and the United States at the turn of the nineteenth century. Exploring such issues as gender struggles in the American Protestant church and bourgeois Japanese women's attitudes towards the "pleasure class" of geishas and prostitutes, Yasutake illuminates the motivations and experiences of American missionaries, U.S. WCTU workers, and their Japanese proteges. The diverse machinations of WCTU activism offer a compelling lesson in the complexities of cultural imperialism.
Main Description
Following landmark trade agreements between Japan and the United States in the 1850s, Tokyo began importing a unique American commodity: Western social activism. As Japan sought to secure its future as a commercial power and American women pursued avenues of political expression, Protestant church-women and, later, members of the Women's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) traveled to the Asian coast to promote Christian teachings and women's social activism.Rumi Yasutake reveals inTransnational Women's Activismthat the resulting American, Japanese, and first generation Japanese-American women's movements came to affect more than alcohol or even religion. While the WCTU employed the language of evangelism and Victorian family values, its members were tactfully expedient in accommodating their traditional causes to suffrage and other feminist goals, in addition to the various political currents flowing through Japan and the United States at the turn of the nineteenth century.Exploring such issues as gender struggles in the American Protestant church and bourgeois Japanese women's attitudes towards the "pleasure class" of geishas and prostitutes, Yasutake illuminates the motivations and experiences of American missionaries, U.S. WCTU workers, and their Japanese proteges. The diverse machinations of WCTU activism offer a compelling lesson in the complexities of cultural imperialism.
Main Description
Following landmark trade agreements between Japan and the United States in the 1850s, Tokyo began importing a unique American commodity: Western social activism. As Japan sought to secure its future as a commercial power and American women pursued avenues of political expression, Protestant church-women and, later, members of the Women's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) traveled to the Asian coast to promote Christian teachings and women's social activism. Rumi Yasutake reveals in Transnational Women's Activism that the resulting American, Japanese, and first generation Japanese-American women's movements came to affect more than alcohol or even religion. While the WCTU employed the language of evangelism and Victorian family values, its members were tactfully expedient in accommodating their traditional causes to suffrage and other feminist goals, in addition to the various political currents flowing through Japan and the United States at the turn of the nineteenth century. Exploring such issues as gender struggles in the American Protestant church and bourgeois Japanese women's attitudes towards the "pleasure class" of geishas and prostitutes, Yasutake illuminates the motivations and experiences of American missionaries, U.S. WCTU workers, and their Japanese protgs. The diverse machinations of WCTU activism offer a compelling lesson in the complexities of cultural imperialism.
Unpaid Annotation
Following landmark trade agreements between Japan and the United States in the 1850s, Tokyo begin importing a unique American commodity: Western social activism. As Japan sought to secure its future as a commercial power and American women pursued avenus of political expression, Protestant church-women and, later, members of the Women's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) traveled to the Asian coast to promote Christian teachings and women's social activism. Rumi Yasutake reveals in Transnational Women's Activism that the resulting American, Japanese, and first generation Japanese-American women's movement came to affect more than alcohol or even religion. While the WCTU employed the language of evangelism and Victorian family values, its memebers were tactfully expedient in accommodating their traditional causes to suffrage and other feminist goals, in addition to the various political currents flowing through Japan and the United States at the turn of the nineteenth century. Exploring such issuesas gender stuggles in the American Protestant church and bourgeois Japanese women's attitudes towards the "plesure class" of geishas and prostitutes, Yasutake illuminates the motivations and experiences of American missionaries, U.S. WCTU workers, and their Japanese proteges. The diverse machinations of WCTU activism offer a compelling lesson in the complexities of cultural imperialism.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Tilling the Ground: American Protestant Foreign Missionary Women in Early Meiji Japan, 1869-1890p. 9
Sprouting a Feminist Consciousness: Japanese Women's WCTU Activism in Tokyo, 1886-1894p. 37
Managing WCTU Activism: The Japanese Way in Late Meiji Japan, 1890-1913p. 77
Beyond Japan to California: Issei Christian Activism in Northern California, 1870s-1920p. 105
Epiloguep. 135
List of Organizationsp. 139
Notesp. 141
Indexp. 179
About the Authorp. 187
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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