Catalogue


Jews & gentiles : a historical sociology of their relations /
Werner J. Cahnman ; edited by Judith T. Marcus and Zoltan Tarr.
imprint
New Brunswick, NJ : Transaction Publishers, c2004.
description
xvi, 253 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0765802120 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New Brunswick, NJ : Transaction Publishers, c2004.
isbn
0765802120 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
5211775
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 225-250) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-01-01:
Cahnman (1902-1980), one of the pioneers of historical sociology, surveys Jewish-Gentile relations from antiquity to the present, focusing on the role of Jews as outsiders who serve as "mediators" between worlds. He pays particular attention to the High Middle Ages in central Europe where, he contends, "the structural patterns that govern Jewish-Gentile relations have been consolidated." Cahnman seeks to explain the rise of Nazism, which he knew firsthand as a German refugee scholar, and devotes chapters to intergroup relations in the US and Israel. This is a dated book that takes into account neither recent historical literature in English nor the vast literature published on this subject in Hebrew. Interested readers will find the works of social historian Jacob Katz both more illuminating and more readable. But turgid as this book is, and lamentably lacking footnotes, it does offer nuggets of insight as well as a great deal of information in a short space. Its publication serves as a loving tribute to Cahnman by devoted students. ^BSumming Up: Optional. For specialized libraries. J. D. Sarna Brandeis University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Cahnman's history is a valuable aid in examining Jewish relationships or responses to Christianity as the model for the modern Jewish experience." --Sander L. Gilman, Modern Judaism
"Cahnman (1902-1980), one of the pioneers of historical sociology, surveys Jewish-Gentile relations from antiquity to the present, focusing on the role of Jews as outsiders who serve as "mediators" between worlds. He pays particular attention to the High Middle Ages in central Europe where, he contends, "the structural patterns that govern Jewish-Gentile relations have been consolidated..." [A] great deal of information in a short space. Its publication serves as a loving tribute to Cahnman by devoted students. Summing Up: Optional. For specialized libraries." -J. D. Sarna, Choice "Cahnman's history is a valuable aid in examining Jewish relationships or responses to Christianity as the model for the modern Jewish experience." -Sander L. Gilman, Modern Judaism
"Cahnman (1902-1980), one of the pioneers of historical sociology, surveys Jewish-Gentile relations from antiquity to the present, focusing on the role of Jews as outsiders who serve as "mediators" between worlds. He pays particular attention to the High Middle Ages in central Europe where, he contends, "the structural patterns that govern Jewish-Gentile relations have been consolidated..." [A] great deal of information in a short space. Its publication serves as a loving tribute to Cahnman by devoted students. Summing Up: Optional. For specialized libraries." --J. D. Sarna, Choice "Cahnman's history is a valuable aid in examining Jewish relationships or responses to Christianity as the model for the modern Jewish experience." --Sander L. Gilman, Modern Judaism
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 2005
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Summaries
Main Description
Studies of the Jewish experience among peoples with whom they live share some similarities with the usual histories of anti-Semitism, but also some differences. When the focus is on anti-Semitism, Jewish history appears as a record of unmitigated hostility against the Jewish people and of passivity on their part. However, as Werner J. Cahnman demonstrates in this posthumous volume, Jewish-Gentile relations are far more complex. There is a long history of mutual contacts, positive as well as antagonistic, even if conflict continues to require particular attention. Cahnman's approach, while following a historical sequence, is sociological in conception. From Roman antiquity through the Middle Ages, into the era of emancipation and the Holocaust, and finally to the present American and Israeli scene, there are basic similarities and various dissimilarities, all of which are described and analyzed. Cahnman tests the theses of classical sociology implicitly, yet unobtrusively. He traces the socio-economic basis of human relations, which Marx and others have emphasized, and considers Jews a "marginal trading people" in the Park-Becker sense. Simmel and Toennies, he shows, understood Jews as "strangers" and "intermediaries." While Cahnman shows that Jews were not "pariahs," as Max Weber thought, he finds a remarkable affinity to Weber's Protestantism-capitalism argument in the tension of Jewish-Christian relations emerging from the bitter theological argument over usury. The primacy of Jewish-Gentile relations in all their complexity and variability is essential for the understanding of Jewish social and political history. This volume is a valuable contribution to that understanding.
Main Description
Studies of the Jewish experience among peoples with whom they live share some similarities with the usual histories of anti-Semitism, but also some differences. When the focus is on anti-Semitism, Jewish history appears as a record of unmitigated hostility against the Jewish people and of passivity on their part. However, as Werner J. Cahnman demonstrates in this posthumous volume, Jewish-Gentile relations are far more complex. There is a long history of mutual contacts, positive as well as antagonistic, even if conflict continues to require particular attention. Cahnman's approach, while following a historical sequence, is sociological in conception. From Roman antiquity through the Middle Ages, into the era of emancipation and the Holocaust, and finally to the present American and Israeli scene, there are basic similarities and various dissimilarities, all of which are described and analyzed. Cahnman tests the theses of classical sociology implicitly, yet unobtrusively. He traces the socio-economic basis of human relations, which Marx and others have emphasized, and considers Jews a "marginal trading people" in the Park-Becker sense. Simmel and Toennies, he shows, understood Jews as "strangers" and "intermediaries." While Cahnman shows that Jews were not "pariahs," as Max Weber thought, he finds a remarkable affinity to Weber's Protestantism-capitalism argument in the tension of Jewish-Christian relations emerging from the bitter theological argument over usury. The primacy of Jewish-Gentile relations in all their complexity and variability is essential for the understanding of Jewish social and political history. This volume is a valuable contribution to that understanding. Cahnman one of the pioneers of historical sociology, surveys Jewish-Gentile relations from antiquity to the present, focusing on the role of Jews as outsiders who serve as "mediators" between worlds. - Choice Werner J. Cahnman (1902-1980) taught at many American universities, including Rutgers and the New School for Social Research. Judith T. Marcus is on the faculty of Kenyon College and is the author of Georg Lukacs and Thomas Mann: A Study in the Sociology of Literature . Zoltan Tarr has taught sociology and history at City College of CUNY, the New School for Social Research, and Rutgers University. He is the author of The Frankfurt School .
Main Description
Studies of the Jewish experience among peoples with whom they live share some similarities with the usual histories of anti-Semitism, but also some differences. When the focus is on anti-Semitism, Jewish history appears as a record of unmitigated hostility against the Jewish people and of passivity on their part. However, as Werner J. Cahnman demonstrates in this posthumous volume, Jewish-Gentile relations are far more complex. There is a long history of mutual contacts, positive as well as antagonistic, even if conflict continues to require particular attention. Cahnman's approach, while following a historical sequence, is sociological in conception. From Roman antiquity through the Middle Ages, into the era of emancipation and the Holocaust, and finally to the present American and Israeli scene, there are basic similarities and various dissimilarities, all of which are described and analyzed. Cahnman tests the theses of classical sociology implicitly, yet unobtrusively. He traces the socio-economic basis of human relations, which Marx and others have emphasized, and considers Jews a "marginal trading people" in the Park-Becker sense. Simmel and Toennies, he shows, understood Jews as "strangers" and "intermediaries." While Cahnman shows that Jews were not "pariahs, " as Max Weber thought, he finds a remarkable affinity to Weber's Protestantism-capitalism argument in the tension of Jewish-Christian relations emerging from the bitter theological argument over usury. The primacy of Jewish-Gentile relations in all their complexity and variability is essential for the understanding of Jewish social and political history. This volume is a valuable contribution to that understanding.
Bowker Data Service Summary
The primacy of Jewish-Gentile relations in all their complexity and variability is essential for the understanding of Jewish social and political history. This volume is a valuable contribution to that understanding.
Table of Contents
Approach to the subjectp. 1
Theology as a point of departurep. 11
The initial position of the Jews in the social structurep. 25
The usury privilegep. 33
The revolt of the massesp. 45
The Jews and the society of the high Middle Agesp. 53
The Judaeo-Arabic symbiosis and the splendor and misery of the Jews of Spainp. 65
The Jews of Eastern Europep. 77
The ghettop. 89
Court Jews and bankersp. 97
Galut and citizenshipp. 111
From liberalism to racism : the dialectics of catastrophep. 123
The actual Jew and the mythical Jewp. 151
A comment about the Soviet Unionp. 179
Is America different?p. 183
Varieties of pluralism in Americap. 197
Jews and blacksp. 209
The state of Israelp. 215
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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