Catalogue


How Australia compares /
Rodney Tiffen and Ross Gittins.
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2004.
description
xii, 282 p. : 26 cm.
ISBN
052183578X (Hbk)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2004.
isbn
052183578X (Hbk)
catalogue key
5211262
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 258-275).
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...a remarkable new factbook from two distinguished Australian analysts..." Too Much newsletter
'... highly valuable as a desktop reference, useful for a quick check of Australia's relative ranking in relation to most issues related to public policy.' Public Administration Today
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
How Australia Compares is a reference work which assesses the nation with its broader group of peers. In an accessible format it compares and contrasts Australia over 17 core aspects of economic, political and social life with 18 leading first-world countries.
Description for Bookstore
Australia Compared is a reference work which assesses the nation with its broader group of peers. In an accessible format it compares and contrasts Australia over 17 core aspects of economic, political and social life with 18 leading first-world countries. Professor Rod Tiffen, a Professor of Political Science and Dr Ross Gittins, the Economics Editor of The Sydney Morning Herald, are a good team who both show keen empirical skills in sourcing and interpreting data and who can communicate figures in a lively way.
Main Description
Australians find it difficult to compare themselves with the world because they exist as a developed English-speaking nation so far from the metropolitan centers of Europe and the U.S. Assessing the nation in relation to its broader group of peers, this book compares and contrasts Australia over 17 core aspects of economic, political and social life with 18 leading first-world countries. Rod Tiffen and Ross Gittins interpret the data and communicate its implications in this comprehensive reference work.
Main Description
How Australia Compares is a handy reference that compares Australia with 17 other developed democracies on a wide range of social, economic and political dimensions. Whenever possible, it gives not only snapshot comparisons from the present, but charts trends over recent decades or even longer. Its scope is encyclopaedic, offering comparative data on as many aspects of social life as possible, from taxation to traffic accidents, homicide rates to health expenditure, and international trade to internet usage. It uses a highly accessible format, devoting a double-page spread to each topic, with tables on one page and a clear explanation and analysis on the facing page. In each discussion the focus is to put the Australian experience into international perspective, drawing out the implications for its performance, policies and prospects.
Description for Library
How Australia Compares is a handy reference that compares Australia with 17 other developed democracies on a wide range of social, economic and political dimensions. Whenever possible, it gives not only snapshot comparisons from the present, but charts trends over recent decades or even longer. Its scope is encyclopaedic, offering comparative data on as many aspects of social life as possible, from taxation to traffic accidents, homicide rates to health expenditure, and international trade to internet usage.
Table of Contents
People
Government and Politics
Economy
Work and the labour force
Government taxes and spending
Health
Education
Inequality and social welfare
International relations
Environment
Science and technology
Telecommunications and computing
Media
Family
Gender
Lifestyles, consumption and leisure
Crime and social problems
Religion, values and attitudes
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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